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Old 09-25-2022, 08:31 PM   #71
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Is this the same government that promised an honorable withdrawal from the Sandbox, leaving a stable and capable government in it's place? If so maybe we should "copper" this bet just a bit.

EVERY new technology has it's growing pains but the "electric boosters" will NEVER admit even the slightest possibility of error. I'm deeply skeptical that these vehicles can be put into service without some real, expensive infrastructure in charging stations, lines, transformers, and generation capacity. It means EVERY truck depot and warehouse will have to have recharge capability. Who pays for that? We know what an emergency fuel/maintenance vehicle for a current big rig looks like; what will these vehicles look like for an ev big rig? How many "electric mechanics" have been trained? Are there even any courses for such a thing? The list of questions goes on.

Hoss
Yes, classes for EV repair exist. I took several of them about 13 to 15 years ago. At the time, we were talking hybrid way more than EV. I took another class or two on EV maybe 10 years ago, but there was very little choice nor "practical" EV with decent range then. I lost a good part of the training due to lack of practice.

There are quite a few EVs on the road now here. As the warranties are generally 8 years on them, and most are only 2-3 years old, I won't be working on many of the EV issues as I'll be retired then. I do maintain some though, not much left to maintain.

Infrastructure for large HD EV trucks is coming into play right now. Trucking companies are installing them, and I believe even some large truck stops like Flying J and Pilot are getting into the game.
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Old 09-25-2022, 08:46 PM   #72
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Not for me! Too expensive! Canít go from from LA to Arizona border or to San Fransisco! Canít drive across Texas! Only good for local daily trips & then you charge.
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Old 09-25-2022, 09:05 PM   #73
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What will happen when the world approaches 90% EV vehicle? Where is all of the energy to charge these things come from that will not cause brown-outs or black-outs? Yeah, the technology is there, but the infrastructure is now severely lacking. This is political idiocy.
If you follow anything, you will quickly realize this won't happen overnight. There are few EVs to be had but demand is high up here. It'll take a decade or two before we even think about approaching 50% EVs on the road. The infrzstructure will have time to catch up.

Ever hear the saying, "build it and they will come"?
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Old 09-25-2022, 11:16 PM   #74
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If you follow anything, you will quickly realize this won't happen overnight. There are few EVs to be had but demand is high up here. It'll take a decade or two before we even think about approaching 50% EVs on the road. The infrzstructure will have time to catch up.

Ever hear the saying, "build it and they will come"?
Could not this happen sooner in California , Washington, Virginia and I'm sure there's more states thank u Gov. . I'm just wondering what's the carbon footprint to make a EV verses a GC vehicle ? Is not what all this is about, saving us from ourselves
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Old 09-26-2022, 06:07 AM   #75
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Could not this happen sooner in California , Washington, Virginia and I'm sure there's more states thank u Gov. . I'm just wondering what's the carbon footprint to make a EV verses a GC vehicle ? Is not what all this is about, saving us from ourselves
That has all been hashed out a long time ago, and then revisited every single time as the naysayers try tp pick EVs apart. Why they do this? Fear?

Evs generally do have a bigger carbon footprint to build, but they generally all have an overall lower carbon footprint by the time they hit the one or two year mark. All this depends on the yearly km driven and the source of the electric power generation.
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Old 09-26-2022, 07:21 AM   #76
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That has all been hashed out a long time ago, and then revisited every single time as the naysayers try tp pick EVs apart. Why they do this? Fear?

Evs generally do have a bigger carbon footprint to build, but they generally all have an overall lower carbon footprint by the time they hit the one or two year mark. All this depends on the yearly km driven and the source of the electric power generation.
No, not fear, but rather skepticism.

Right now most of this stuff is "vaporware" beyond a few experimental types. I understand that. But the "hypesters" are suggesting that the science and engineering of all this is a "done deal." It's not. Which EV big rigs are in production? How many are on the road? What does their performance profile look like? Ditto for aircraft, boats, etc.

Here is one, the Robinson R-44. Flight endurance so far? THREE MIN!!! https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/...-takes-flight/

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Old 09-26-2022, 07:59 AM   #77
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No, not fear, but rather skepticism.

Right now most of this stuff is "vaporware" beyond a few experimental types. I understand that. But the "hypesters" are suggesting that the science and engineering of all this is a "done deal." It's not. Which EV big rigs are in production? How many are on the road? What does their performance profile look like? Ditto for aircraft, boats, etc.
Hoss
Some light reading for you. https://www.autoweek.com/news/green-...g-semi-trucks/

As I posted earlier, some Kenworth EVs are arriving locally. Many EV buses have been in operation for at least 2 years here. Lots of medium duty type trucks are getting put in production.
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Old 09-26-2022, 10:25 AM   #78
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Some light reading for you. https://www.autoweek.com/news/green-...g-semi-trucks/

As I posted earlier, some Kenworth EVs are arriving locally. Many EV buses have been in operation for at least 2 years here. Lots of medium duty type trucks are getting put in production.
Yes but...did you read the whole article? Even Kenworth says its longest range truck is "best suited for local deliveries". I do agree that there are certain use cases where EV's will work and the school bus example is one of those. They travel set routes where the conditions and distances are known. They also generally pick up the kids in the AM and take them home in the PM, so if they have enough juice to complete their route one time and make it back to the barn, they can charge all day while they wait for the afternoon run. Postal delivery might be another example...do a set, well known route then back to the barn.

But since this is an RV forum, let's circle back to that. So far, most people here have been talking theory, with few citing actual experience with an RV...and those that have are towing very small (relatively speeking). Nothing I've seen makes me belive I would be able to replace my Ram 2500 with an EV, for the trips I take, within the next 10 years. I also belive that when it comes to infrastructure RV's will be at the bottom of the priority pile. Basically, when it does come, RV people will be competing with OTR truckers for charging spots that have both the juice and the physical size to accommodate a 50+ foot long rig. Yes, I know those with diesels probably aready do and in the longer term that may not be an issue. But there is no chance in...the world...that I want to be an early adopter.


Hey, how many out there have tried towing a 7600 pound travel trailer accross Kansas or Nebraska...away from the interstates? How about the mountains? Even with gasoline, there can be some tense moments when you arrive at a gas station that Google says is there but is actually closed. These small towns will probably also be the last places to get electrik infrastructure. Theory and hope are not a practical solution.

For the guy with the picture pulling his small trailer with a Tesla, check out the TFL Truck youtube video where they pull a trailer up the 7% to 8% grade on the 8 mile streatch of I70 up to the Eisenhower tunnel. It did it and even did it pretty well at is max towing capacity. But they had to tow the trailer to the start location with a gas truck or it wouldn't have enough juice to make it. Afterwards, there was a Tesla super charger available, but they had to unhitch the trailer and leave it in a parking lot in order to get into the charging station. So it got up the mountain fine, but charging was still the issue.
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Old 09-26-2022, 11:05 AM   #79
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Old 09-26-2022, 02:00 PM   #80
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Yes but...did you read the whole article? Even Kenworth says its longest range truck is "best suited for local deliveries". I do agree that there are certain use cases where EV's will work and the school bus example is one of those. They travel set routes where the conditions and distances are known. They also generally pick up the kids in the AM and take them home in the PM, so if they have enough juice to complete their route one time and make it back to the barn, they can charge all day while they wait for the afternoon run. Postal delivery might be another example...do a set, well known route then back to the barn.

But since this is an RV forum, let's circle back to that. So far, most people here have been talking theory, with few citing actual experience with an RV...and those that have are towing very small (relatively speeking). Nothing I've seen makes me belive I would be able to replace my Ram 2500 with an EV, for the trips I take, within the next 10 years. I also belive that when it comes to infrastructure RV's will be at the bottom of the priority pile. Basically, when it does come, RV people will be competing with OTR truckers for charging spots that have both the juice and the physical size to accommodate a 50+ foot long rig. Yes, I know those with diesels probably aready do and in the longer term that may not be an issue. But there is no chance in...the world...that I want to be an early adopter.


Hey, how many out there have tried towing a 7600 pound travel trailer accross Kansas or Nebraska...away from the interstates? How about the mountains? Even with gasoline, there can be some tense moments when you arrive at a gas station that Google says is there but is actually closed. These small towns will probably also be the last places to get electrik infrastructure. Theory and hope are not a practical solution.

For the guy with the picture pulling his small trailer with a Tesla, check out the TFL Truck youtube video where they pull a trailer up the 7% to 8% grade on the 8 mile streatch of I70 up to the Eisenhower tunnel. It did it and even did it pretty well at is max towing capacity. But they had to tow the trailer to the start location with a gas truck or it wouldn't have enough juice to make it. Afterwards, there was a Tesla super charger available, but they had to unhitch the trailer and leave it in a parking lot in order to get into the charging station. So it got up the mountain fine, but charging was still the issue.
No kidding! Where did I state any of the big EVs are ready for 1000km hauls? It will surely come though. It may take a decade, maybe 2, we shall see.

I don't know if trucking is THAT much different in the USA than it is up here, but, for the most part, routes are pretty well established and many truckers do the same boring run day after day, week after week. It makes for better efficiency and route planning. They know how far and for how long the trucks are out, but minor detours can exist.

250km runs are sufficient for many trucking routes here. Of coourse that wouldn't work for a cross Texas or cross Kansas run, at least not today. We'll tallk in a few years and see then.

FWIW, I have done those exact runs you mention with my gas dually hauling the RV. Crossed Kansas East to West and crossed Nebraska West to East. Never stressed with range or filling up, but they sure are long, boring drives, especially when it's 100F or more like it was for us.
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Old 09-27-2022, 08:26 AM   #81
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No kidding! Where did I state any of the big EVs are ready for 1000km hauls? It will surely come though. It may take a decade, maybe 2, we shall see...
So, you are actually more pessimistic than me. I said I didn't think an EV could replace my Ram 2500 within the next ten years. You said "...maybe 2" decades, or up to twice as long as I predicted. So, in 2035 when no new gas vehicals can be sold in California and other states but EV'S still can't do the heavy + long distance hauling, I'll be 74. I may be done by then as no male in my family has ever lived last 70. So my wife can sell my truck in California and make some $$ I guess EV's are a win for me after all ��
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Old 09-27-2022, 08:32 AM   #82
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So, you are actually more pessimistic than me. I said I didn't think an EV could replace my Ram 2500 within the next ten years. You said "...maybe 2" decades, or up to twice as long as I predicted. So, in 2035 when no new gas vehicals can be sold in California and other states but EV'S still can't do the heavy + long distance hauling, I'll be 74. I may be done by then as no male in my family has ever lived last 70. So my wife can sell my truck in California and make some $$ I guess EV's are a win for me after all ��
In 2035 you’ll still be able to buy gas and diesel 3/4 tons, 1 tons, etc etc. even some half tons in California. The sales ban is for vehicles 8500 GVWR and under.
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Old 09-27-2022, 11:13 AM   #83
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Fear, No Way

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That has all been hashed out a long time ago, and then revisited every single time as the naysayers try tp pick EVs apart. Why they do this? Fear?

Evs generally do have a bigger carbon footprint to build, but they generally all have an overall lower carbon footprint by the time they hit the one or two year mark. All this depends on the yearly km driven and the source of the electric power generation.
Yes, one must revisit EV production just like ICE production ,then there's the future ERV carbon footprint . I'm all for clean RV's and Trucks but is not the carbon footprint what's being sold here to us and at what cost ? I'm thinking ( future ) who's going to be able to afford one ERV and maintain it the 1% and to hell with everyone else. Let's not buy into the lie just yet . Here's a thought, let the PEOPLE decide with their dollars what's good not the Gov. making them.
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Old 09-27-2022, 11:50 AM   #84
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Let's Go California

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In 2035 you’ll still be able to buy gas and diesel 3/4 tons, 1 tons, etc etc. even some half tons in California. The sales ban is for vehicles 8500 GVWR and under.
WOW , just think you will still be able to buy gas and diesel trucks in California. Ok but at what cost ? What will the cost be for fuel, the truck you have to order, the taxes , license fee's ? After all it has a larger carbon footprint and you should pay more right ? You just have to love California , always looking after it's own.

Here's something worth reading or not
https://www.caranddriver.com/shoppin...heaper-to-own/
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