RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Truck Camper Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-27-2020, 10:56 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 117
Truck camper mounted on utility trailer

Basically I am seriously considering buying a new truck camper to mount to a utility trailer that I can tow around and use like a travel trailer. My question is, has anyone tried this and are there any problems with the setup? I was thinking the extra vibration from a utility trailer may cause the camper to fatigue more quickly than it would in a truck bed but maybe a trailer with torsion axle suspension would mitigate the effect? Otherwise I can't think of any concerns.



For those who wondering why I would want to use the wrong tool for the job instead of just buying a travel trailer,
My situation is as follows:
1. I have been planning to retire or work a very light schedule and transition to a semi nomadic lifestyle in an RV or camper.
2. Because of COVID and other factors, I will probably continue working full time for at least a couple more years while stationed in Florida.
3. Ultimately I want to explore mountainous terrain and stay in campgrounds that may not accommodate larger RVs. My top choices are a truck camper or an Escape 5.0TA as they can both accommodate my height, can be of good quality and have a smaller footprint.
4. Both of my top choices will require a pickup truck which I would rather not purchase until I retire because it would be parked in the elements while rarely being driven.

My options are:
1. Buy a light camper trailer that I can tow behind the vehicle I already own, (4,000 lb max). Use it in and around Florida and sell it in a couple of years when I retire to buy what I want.
2. Wait until I retire and just buy once avoiding the of loss to depreciation and storage fees.

OR

3. Buy a truck camper that will work for me when I retire, mount it to a utility trailer so I can tow it with my current vehicle and buy a truck for it when I'm ready. That way I can still explore close to Florida in a camper, (which is very flat terrain and should not burden my tow vehicle) and I can start getting used to my camper making it my own. After buying a truck, I could still use the trailer to store the camper when not in use while still being able to push it around with a dolly and I could tow it behind the truck with camper installed if I needed extra cargo capacity.

Anyway, that's my long, complicated explanation. I tried to arrange this post so that readers could skip everything after the first paragraph and still understand the premise.
Raider47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-28-2020, 01:22 AM   #2
laj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,791
Truck camper mounted on utility trailer

I think your all confused. You say with current vehicle your max tow is 4k. A truck camper will weigh 3k up, more likely then not closer to 4k wet, ready to go. Now you have to add the weight of the trailer you need to haul it on. For that much weight the trailer will add anther 2-3k min. so now your at approx. 7k or more.

I think your better off either :
buying a trailer in your weight range
just getting the p/u and camper now or
waiting till your really ready to retire, then buying exactly what you want.

T/C are probably the most versatile rv, but also probably the most expensive per ft. so try to get it right the first time.
jmho.
laj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2020, 11:58 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 117
The camper and trailer im looking at weigh less than 4k wet.
Raider47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2020, 01:58 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Kelowna, B.C. Canada
Posts: 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raider47 View Post
The camper and trailer im looking at weigh less than 4k wet.
make and model numbers? ....don't forget the 500 lbs plus for water, propane, gear, etc.

Dave
__________________
Outdoors RV 21RBS, 2003 Dodge 3500 dually, Cummins, 6 spd.
Dave Pelletier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2020, 02:11 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 24,663
This guy does it. Brings along a Jeep on the trailer with it.Click image for larger version

Name:	1029201502.jpeg
Views:	11
Size:	32.8 KB
ID:	306725Click image for larger version

Name:	1029201502a.jpeg
Views:	9
Size:	34.3 KB
ID:	306726
twinboat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 08:19 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Swoope, VA
Posts: 258
It might be tricky getting a trailer's tongue weight correct with a TC on it. I'm sure it can be done but it will take some trial and error moving the TC forward and back on the trailer to get the balance right.
Many TCs have the sewer tanks and/or connections hanging out underneath past the back of the truck bed. You may need to make a hole in the floor of the trailer to accommodate that.

I too am curious what TC/ trailer combo you have picked that is less than 4,000 pounds wet. The TC I had was an 11' model but it had no slides, and no basement. It weighted in at 4,000 pounds loaded for camping. I would suspect a trailer rated for 4,000 pounds would almost certainly need to be a tandem axle which would seem to weigh nearly 1,000 pounds.
I would think you would want a tandem axle trailer anyway. It would tow so much nicer. Single axle trailers are not fun to tow.
__________________
2005 Chevy CC Dually D/A, 2009 2500 Suburban, 2004 Rinker Captiva 232 boat
KD4UPL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2020, 08:28 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 117
I'm looking at the Scout Kenai and an Aluma 6812H trailer. The Scout Camper should be less than 2K wet with options and the trailer is about 600 lbs.
I would go with a single axle for low weight and so I could maneuver it by hand with a trailer dolly on my property with a narrow alley. Once I get a truck, I would still use the trailer for storage and I could push it to the side of my driveway allowing the truck to get in and out of the garage.
Raider47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2020, 08:32 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 117
I have towed a single axle cargo trailer before for the first few moves I made in the military. I upgraded to a tandem later and the improved ride quality was noticable. That is my main concern with my plan as I do not want to beat up the camper before I even get a truck. I don't think a tandem axle trailer wouldn't be maneuverable by hand with a dolly so it wouldn't fit in my property and I would have to rent a parking space for storage. If I have to keep it in storage, I would rather just wait because I wouldn't use it enough to buy it early and I wouldn't be able to work on it at home.
Raider47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2020, 09:52 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Kelowna, B.C. Canada
Posts: 111
OK the camper and trailer you mention aren't normal items; the camper doesn't come with a shower or toilette and carries less than 5 galls of water. A typical lightweight, full featured camper is a Bigfoot 15C9.6 which weighs 2245 dry and about 3000 fully loaded.

Ditto on the trailer; that trailer is only 500 lbs but a single axle trailer with no brakes and 205/75/14 tires is way too light to haul any camper IMO regardless of whether or not you can squeek under the tire and axle ratings.

Honestly, I think the best advise is to buy a tiny travel trailer or wait until you are ready to buy your truck.

2 cents,

Dave
__________________
Outdoors RV 21RBS, 2003 Dodge 3500 dually, Cummins, 6 spd.
Dave Pelletier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2020, 06:37 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 117
Trailer weight would be well within limits and I could add brakes if I wanted but cruising around Florida, I don't think it would be necessary at only 2.5k lbs. A small travel trailer would be of similar specs so I'm not seeing the advantage from a towing perspective.
Raider47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
camper, trailer, truck camper



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is a front mounted dirt bike on a camper truck legal? Septuagenari Truck Camper Discussion 9 12-14-2018 02:36 PM
A "Camper" is a "Camper, and a"Trailer" is a "Trailer"! OHVtime iRV2.com General Discussion 31 10-22-2017 08:57 AM
Converting utility trailer into travel trailer wisa02 Travel Trailer Discussion 15 07-22-2012 01:05 PM
Camper Tiedown on Utility Truck edpogue Truck Camper Discussion 2 10-06-2011 05:01 PM
MH mounted vs Toad mounted tow bar Romer1 Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 5 09-19-2010 01:35 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.