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Old 11-25-2019, 12:45 PM   #15
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Instead of carrying water bottles, get hydration packs with a bladder and a hose. You won't need to stop and take the packs off to get a drink.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:19 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by reubenray View Post
Being Black Friday is coming up I figured it would be a good time to get what we need for our Spring trip to Arizona, Utah, Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota. What will I need for light (up to 5 miles) hiking? We have boots already.
As most of these hikes will involve elevations that you are not used to - IMHO the best thing to GET is In Shape.

Out west nothing Beats a good Hat. - Tilley - https://www.amazon.com/Tilley-Endura...EQF&th=1&psc=1

Then a good travel Camera - https://www.bestbuy.com/site/panason...?skuId=5866713

That should do it -

Best of Luck

I always take my Leatherman (With the Wine opener) or Gerber Multi Tool with the First aid kit - they are kept together - Band aids, surprising how many I have passed out to others, so I always have many.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:20 PM   #17
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Suggest to your wife that a hat is mandatory.

Check written trail distances carefully. Sometimes the length given is one-way. Don't overextend yourself on distance or elevation. We volunteered at Lost Dutchman State Park in Arizona and there were many helicopter rescues from the Flatiron hike by even young, able-bodied persons because they bit off more than they could chew or it became dark and needed help getting down.

For the distance you're talking about you shouldn't have any issues. You'll be with others, for sure. You won't have a trail to yourself. At Bryce be sure to go down into the canyon and hike. It's like a fairy wonderland down there. Start your hikes early morning for less people and less heat.

Each national park has a great website which gives info on the popular hikes and of course, stop at the Visitor Centers for additional info.

Your trip sounds fantastic. You've planned it in detail. Be sure to give us a good write up of the 'dos' and 'don'ts'.
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Old 11-25-2019, 03:15 PM   #18
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If you have a smartphone, I found the AllTrails app is great and is worth the extra money for the full version. Even if you don't have a signal, it still uses the phone GPS.

A backpack with a bladder works for me over Nalgenes. With a bladder you sip along the way vs. waiting often too long to stop and pull out your Nalgenes and gulp away.

You should also carry a water filter straw. Light and great in an emergency if you ran out of water. For longer hikes, a pump water filter is a necessity.
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Old 11-25-2019, 04:47 PM   #19
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Old saying, drink before you're thirsty and eat before you're hungry. When the humidity is low, in the SW it may drop under 10% RH, your sweat evaporates without you realizing you're sweating. Leaving you dehydrated and potentially in trouble.

I've always used water bottles instead of bladders. Your don't need to pull off your pack, just have your partner get the bottle for you. This also provides a check that both of you are drinking water. I've seen folks sip so frequently from a bladder that they run short/out of water without realizing the bladder is nearly empty. With a bottle you can better monitor your remaining water supply. In some cases bladders are great, but I'd carry a water bottle as a backup supply. On most hikes I carry at least two bottles. Sometimes they have a way os slipping out of someone's hands and down over the cliff it goes. Seen it happen several times. Just saying from 60 years of experience in the Rockies.
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Old 11-25-2019, 05:08 PM   #20
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I agree with all suggested items listed above. Parks like Bryce(9000') and Grand Canyon(7000') have hiking trails that are at high elevations and can be cool or even cold in the spring mornings. We make sure we have mitts, beanies &/or toques packed in the RV. A beanie is a tighter fit can works well under a hat. Get good quality hiking boots(eg. Columbia or Merrell for example) as these hikes can have some rock scrambling. Big hats are good.These parks will be busy but once you head out on the trail it's fine. Try to camp inside all of these parks as you can hit the trails with out worries of traffic and parking. (picture at Capitol Reef)
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Old 11-26-2019, 07:09 AM   #21
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When we are hiking, we like to wear convertible hiking pants (zip off into shorts) and running arm warmers instead of a jacket unless it is extremely cold. Very easy to take off and on for weather changes and very little bulk or weight.

Also, headlamps. Hiking late in the day in shadow or dense woods gets dark quickly.
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Old 11-26-2019, 07:46 AM   #22
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Given the OPs original inquiry, and wanting to spend some money for his big summer trip in 2020......

It’s been mentioned before, but it can’t be stated strong enough...... the most important thing you can take on this trip is a healthy, strong body, in reasonably good shape. The number of people that are really NOT having fun on even the easiest trails equates directly now how of shape many people are. Getting suckered into going down the Bright Angel trail to the first rest stop can quickly turn ugly going back up if you are out of shape, and is no place for those that are obese or have any sort of mobility issues.

I’ll start with a big one first, get a medium size Yeti cooler and some freeze packs that will live in your vehicle that you’ll be driving around in. You’ll want to carry your lunch /snacks around the parks as you explore. The food in the parks is expensive to start with, probably not convenient to where you’ll often be, and nutritionally, it pretty much just tourist junk food that you can’t live on for your 3 month trip.

Water bottles.
We have several of the high quality insulated metal water bottles, some plastic bottles as well as a bladder that well also take on longer hikes. Put plenty of ice in the insulated bottles then you can refill them from the bladder or plastic bottles. Drinking hot water from a bladder isn’t very refreshing.

Back packs.
We have several, from small shoulder sacks that will carry a bottle of water and a snack, to a mid size day hike pack.

Water is heavy. I’ve gotten to the point that for all but the shortest walks / hikes, I usually just take the day pack, for the very important reason is that it’s simply more comfortable to wear. A good pack will have waist straps that move the weight from your shoulder and back to your hips. They also will (usually) have a flexible frame with a mesh to provide ventilation between your back and the pack. Something like this for reference (and yes, it’s well worth the cost).

https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product...LON33_142.html

You’ll often want to take a shell / jacket, snacks or lunch, and a first aid kit, so a medium size pack just makes all that easier too.

A First Aid kit has been mentioned. We’ve make up our own, and have them in sealed bags (a very simple one for easy days, and another for longer hikes, which also includes an Ace bandage and larger bandages. We also have a whistle, and a multi tool that goes on longer hikes as well.

Hats:
A wide brim, white or light colored had, with ventilation in the crown. Having a strap that you can put around your chin will be appreciated when it’s windy.

Shirts:
When it’s hot, the new light weight, wicking fabrics are wonderful in the heat; heavy cotton shirts that just cling to you when you are sweating get old in a hurry now that there are better options available. I have short sleeve and long sleeve crew neck shirts, as well as many button front shirts. I’ve also grown fond of the long sleeve shirts like this: https://www.columbia.com/mens-silver...r=100#start=13

Yes, the old tale of a long sleeve short being more comfortable in the sun actually has come merit.

And while it should be obvious, light colored clothing is much more comfortable (don’t laugh, I don’t know how many people we see in all black when it’s 90 degrees out).

Shoes:
Some people seem to think flip flops are fine for hiking. No kidding, see it all the time. They will also often be the ones dressed in all black

While we have medium weight hiking boots, we’ve gotten to the point that unless we are going on what we know is a more difficult / rigorous trail, we more often go with lighter weight trail shoes, such as this:

https://www.merrell.com/US/en/moab-2...=false&start=1

The one thing I like about these type of shoes vs. a heavier boot or hiking shoe, is that the sole conforms to smaller rocks, vs. stiffer sole that seems to slide off them.

You’ll also want high quality hiking socks, like the Smart Wool ones. Yep, expensive (like $15) but you’ll appreciate them. And yes, they are even better when it’s hot.

Just to finish off, you might want to consider a pair of pants that the lower leg zips off. It’s nice when it’s cool early, but heats up quickly later in the morning.

I’m not a fan of hiking poles, as I prefer both hands to be free. My wife uses a single pole.

Enough for now, hope this was helpful
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Old 11-26-2019, 07:55 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Betr2Trvl View Post
Given the OPs original inquiry, and wanting to spend some money for his big summer trip in 2020......

Itís been mentioned before, but it canít be stated strong enough...... the most important thing you can take on this trip is a healthy, strong body, in reasonably good shape. The number of people that are really NOT having fun on even the easiest trails equates directly now how of shape many people are. Getting suckered into going down the Bright Angel trail to the first rest stop can quickly turn ugly going back up if you are out of shape, and is no place for those that are obese or have any sort of mobility issues.

Iíll start with a big one first, get a medium size Yeti cooler and some freeze packs that will live in your vehicle that youíll be driving around in. Youíll want to carry your lunch /snacks around the parks as you explore. The food in the parks is expensive to start with, probably not convenient to where youíll often be, and nutritionally, it pretty much just tourist junk food that you canít live on for your 3 month trip.

Water bottles.
We have several of the high quality insulated metal water bottles, some plastic bottles as well as a bladder that well also take on longer hikes. Put plenty of ice in the insulated bottles then you can refill them from the bladder or plastic bottles. Drinking hot water from a bladder isnít very refreshing.

Back packs.
We have several, from small shoulder sacks that will carry a bottle of water and a snack, to a mid size day hike pack.

Water is heavy. Iíve gotten to the point that for all but the shortest walks / hikes, I usually just take the day pack, for the very important reason is that itís simply more comfortable to wear. A good pack will have waist straps that move the weight from your shoulder and back to your hips. They also will (usually) have a flexible frame with a mesh to provide ventilation between your back and the pack. Something like this for reference (and yes, itís well worth the cost).

https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product...LON33_142.html

Youíll often want to take a shell / jacket, snacks or lunch, and a first aid kit, so a medium size pack just makes all that easier too.

Hats:
A wide brim, white or light colored had, with ventilation in the crown. Having a strap that you can put around your chin will be appreciated when itís windy.

Shirts:
When itís hot, the new light weight, wicking fabrics are wonderful in the heat; heavy cotton shirts that just cling to you when you are sweating get old in a hurry now that there are better options available. I have short sleeve and long sleeve crew neck shirts, as well as many bottom front shirts. Iíve also grown fond of the long sleeve shirts like this: https://www.columbia.com/mens-silver...r=100#start=13

Yes, the old tale of a long sleeve short being more comfortable in the sun actually has come merit.

And while it should be obvious, light colored clothing is much more comfortable (donít laugh, I donít know how many people we see in all black when itís 90 degrees out).

Shoes:
Some people seem to think flip flops are fine for hiking. No kidding, see it all the time. They will also often be the ones dressed in all black

While we have medium weight hiking boots, weíve gotten to the point that unless we are going on what we know is a more difficult / rigorous trail, we more often go with lighter weight trail shoes, such as this:

https://www.merrell.com/US/en/moab-2...=false&start=1

The one thing I like about these type of shoes vs. a heavier boot or hiking shoe, is that the sole conforms to smaller rocks, vs. stiffer sole that seems to slide off them.

Youíll also want high quality hiking socks, like the Smart Wool ones. Yep, expensive (like $15) but youíll appreciate them. And yes, they are even better when itís hot.

Just to finish off, you might want to consider a pair of pants that the lower leg zips off. Itís nice when itís cool early, but heats up quickly later in the morning.

Enough for now, hope this was helpful
Hope the OP reads this - as it is filled with sage advice. Thinking that likely if the DW is not a Hat person (previously stated) - they are not likely going to do many Long, Honest hikes. Still just for the Day trips in the Toad - much of the advice given here still applies.

JMHO
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Old 11-26-2019, 02:22 PM   #24
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Definitely know what you're getting into before starting the hike! Someone else has already recommended the Alltrails app. Do not use Google maps for trails! I learned the hard way that Google gives a more direct distance and doesn't account for all the twists, turns, and elevation changes. I got some angry looks from the wife after the one-hour hike was rolling into hours two and three.
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Old 11-26-2019, 06:39 PM   #25
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My hat is a wide brim one that I call my rain hat. It protects my $3,000 worth of hearing aids. My wife was looking at wide brim hats today.

We are both fairly healthy with the exception of our aches and pains in our joints. We are just starting back into our winter workout routine after finishing a trip a short while back which includes an elliptical three days a week and weights three days a week. The RV resort we live in has a full fitness center. But we know our limitations and we will plan our hikes around them.
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Old 11-26-2019, 06:43 PM   #26
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Definitely know what you're getting into before starting the hike! Someone else has already recommended the Alltrails app. Do not use Google maps for trails! I learned the hard way that Google gives a more direct distance and doesn't account for all the twists, turns, and elevation changes. I got some angry looks from the wife after the one-hour hike was rolling into hours two and three.
On our previous trip while at Ives Run COE in Pennsylvania we took one of these hikes. It was a paved road that we knew we had to come back the same way. We did not expect the hills until it was to late. At one point I asked where the movie Deliverance was filmed at being it was starting to look just like that area. But we did not hear any banjos.
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Old 02-15-2020, 06:51 AM   #27
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I have started to get my stuff and a neighbor said to get bear spray. Would it be best to get it a home via Amazon or buy it on the trip?

We will only be taking short hikes ( 1 to 3 hours) on managed trails. Do we need this?
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Old 02-15-2020, 07:35 AM   #28
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I have started to get my stuff and a neighbor said to get bear spray. Would it be best to get it a home via Amazon or buy it on the trip?

We will only be taking short hikes ( 1 to 3 hours) on managed trails. Do we need this?
Yes you need it. You are walking through the bear’s “home”; they aren’t too particular if it’s for 10 minutes, 3 hours, or two days. Last summer in east glacier we had two hikes impacted by bears on / near trails.

On one, the rangers were all over it, as the bear was moving along Going to the Sun road near the road and one of the popular trails to a water fall, so we had to hold up on a trail while it passed. Nice the rangers were there.

On another hike in Many Glaicer, a trail was pretty much taken over by a family of bears near the lake (easy to see from a fork in the trail above the lake) so those at the lake were stuck there (and they wouldn’t let people off the tour boats), and no one was stupid enough to head down.

This little guy was just off GTTS road. Photo taken from the Jeep, with the camera on zoom.... even then it was a bit too close for comfort, but not like we could go anywhere since the road was blocked with everyone gawking. So it’s not like they are all deep in the woods.

You can buy it at REI, on line or whatever, or any park stores once you get there. Get one with the little holster.....


Regards
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