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Old 12-21-2019, 08:12 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by IC2 View Post
I had a tire go flat while backing in my driveway. A valve broke. The valve was replaced and no damage seen - but that tire is now suspect and at 5years old about aged out for RV use.

Since I've been hearing/seeing rave reviews about Sailuns, am considering installing all four. Sailuns are rated full capacity at 110 psig. The wheels on our 5er are rated either 80 or 94 - there is a conflict in the wheel manufacturer's, Sendel, website.

The Sailun ST235/85R16 is rated 3640# capacity at 80 psig and 3800 at 95 psig. These figures are from the Sailun inflation chart

Question is, has anyone run these tires on an RV at 80psig? Any abnormal wear patterns?
Yes, I run my Sailuns at 80 psi. I have 110 psi rated wheels, but my axle load is right at 11k. With TPMS I see pressures increase to 90-95 psi on hot days (108-110* days). Tire wear is great, going on 3 years now with the Sailuns. A friend of mine has a Heartland BigHorn 5ver with about 1k more in axle weight and he runs 90 psi in his. Same results, no problems with the tires.

Rich
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Old 12-21-2019, 11:15 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich1961 View Post
Yes, I run my Sailuns at 80 psi. I have 110 psi rated wheels, but my axle load is right at 11k. With TPMS I see pressures increase to 90-95 psi on hot days (108-110* days). Tire wear is great, going on 3 years now with the Sailuns. A friend of mine has a Heartland BigHorn 5ver with about 1k more in axle weight and he runs 90 psi in his. Same results, no problems with the tires.

Rich
Thank you. This is exactly the information I am looking for. I suspect others will benefit from this, especially when there are so few choices for a robust tire other then Goodyear's overpriced offings or China 'bombs'
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Old 12-21-2019, 08:21 PM   #31
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Wow, It's been a few days since I was on this site and I guess my second post was confusing. I was attempting to answer the OP when I said Yes, No in answer to what I took to be two questions. My experience is I replaced the OEM Marathons with Sailuns. I went from ST235-80-16E to ST235-85-16G. My camper came with 110 psi wheels. My thought process was the failure point I had experienced and witnessed was usually tires and a more robust tire would not be a bad idea. I went with the 85 profile to raise the camper a bit. I have over 10,000 miles on the Sailuns with zero problems. I run 80psi cold and my TPMS shows about a 15* increase when I tow. The only negative is the Anderson levelers I use occasionally are a tighter fit. I see no reason to not run 80 psi unless your load would warrant a higher pressure. It would help if folks who reply to a thread would read the entire thread first.
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Old 12-22-2019, 05:40 AM   #32
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Wow, It's been a few days since I was on this site and I guess my second post was confusing. I was attempting to answer the OP when I said Yes, No in answer to what I took to be two questions. My experience is I replaced the OEM Marathons with Sailuns. I went from ST235-80-16E to ST235-85-16G. My camper came with 110 psi wheels. My thought process was the failure point I had experienced and witnessed was usually tires and a more robust tire would not be a bad idea. I went with the 85 profile to raise the camper a bit. I have over 10,000 miles on the Sailuns with zero problems. I run 80psi cold and my TPMS shows about a 15* increase when I tow. The only negative is the Anderson levelers I use occasionally are a tighter fit. I see no reason to not run 80 psi unless your load would warrant a higher pressure. It would help if folks who reply to a thread would read the entire thread first.
Thanks for your input - you are forgiven for your short answer, I read it both ways but ....... Made for some 'interesting' discussion.

I use Beech Lane levelers which are similar to the Andersen and seem to be more robust plus easily fit between the current 285 tires on our 5er with room to spare without trimming. If yours break, as have many others, take a look here: https://www.amazon.com/Beech-Lane-Ca.../dp/B078TJC9FN
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Old 12-22-2019, 07:57 AM   #33
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Thanks for the Beech tip. I rarely need to level since I added Lippert auto-level to the camper. Mostly to keep the low side tires on the ground when it levels.
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Old 12-22-2019, 01:39 PM   #34
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To the person airing down when its hot out... millions if not billions of miles are taken daily. No one airs down..or up daily. You would be hard pressed to prove to me 80 psi wouldn't have damaged your rims on the pot hole.

I agree air holds up your x. The tire keeps it contained.

I would say there is a minimum pressure but manufacture is the only one that knows that. But 80 is close in my opinion. I would watch bounce and chalk results. Good luck.
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Old 12-26-2019, 03:07 PM   #35
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The E-350 had a brand new tires all around when I bought it from El Monte. The rears didn't last more than 15,000 miles, and I don't know if they were Sailun's or not, I had to have them replaced in NJ b/c they were butt naked.

My definitive experience with these POS's was when the two fronts both had internal belt failures within 500mi of each other. Probably right around 20K miles on them when they went.

I've NEVER had a problem with a internal tire failure running BFG's, Toyo's, Hankooks, Michellins, Cheng-Shin's (dirt bikes), Conti's (street bikes) so after having two of these no-name (or at least a name I'd never heard of before I had them on the MH) tires go tits up, I wouldn't even recommend them to my ex-wife.
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Old 12-26-2019, 03:37 PM   #36
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I have asked 2 times so far and have yet to hear from anyone who has run Sailun ST tires at 80 psig and what the wheels on our trailer are rated at, now confirmed by Sendel. I have yet to have seen anyone answer other then, yes, they have them and all is great at 110 psig. Thanks to those folks. I would not hesitate a minute if our 5er had 110 psig rated wheels.

What I do not want to do is spend several hundred dollars on tires that will exhibit abnormal outer edge wear if they are inflated 30 pounds below their rated values. Additionally, I do not want a tire failure from being run at that 80 psig then overheating.

As a note, both Amazon and Walmart are advertising them at $138.12 each today but a 3*F day is not a good one to buy tires

If you buy the Load Range E Sailun tires I see no reason to worry as long as you confirm your actual max tire loading is no greater than 85% of the tire rating at 80 psi. That gives you a reasonable 15% RESERVE LOAD. If you are concerned you can adjust tire size & inflation & loading to get to 80% loading as 20% reserve is better yet.




All above assumes tires fit the wheels & RV.
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Old 12-26-2019, 03:42 PM   #37
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Ran 19.5" Sailuns for 6 years and 10,000 miles on motorhome. They looked new when I replaced them this year. Ran 100#, rode hard. 90 #, still hard. 80, ok. 70 perfect which is what Winnebago prints on driver's door.
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Old 12-26-2019, 03:44 PM   #38
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Responce to many posters.

Wheels like tires base their pressure rating on the "cold" inflation. i.e. when at ambient.
Unless you have an actual identified problem you should NEVER bleed off the hot pressure as long as you did a proper job of setting the "cold" pressure.

IC2. Those two ratings are based on different Load Range. E and F Be sure you know which tire you have.

grindstone01 I have seen a number of wheels with bends due to hitting pot holes or other road debri.

SteveJ What was the load on your tires as measured on a truck scale?
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Old 12-26-2019, 09:09 PM   #39
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[QUOTE=.

grindstone01 I have seen a number of wheels with bends due to hitting pot holes or other road debri.

?[/QUOTE]


I believe my 130 PSI high rolling pressure with the Sailun tires contributed to the 2 cracked rims I experienced. If the tires would have been bled off to stay under 120 PSI rolling, like I normally would have done, then the tire sidewalls would have taken up the flex from the pot hole hit and not transferred all the impact to the rims. Contrary to what most posters say, I will continue to fine tune my tire PSI and they won't exceed 120 working PSI again!!
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Old 12-27-2019, 05:14 AM   #40
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Old 12-27-2019, 06:06 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by grindstone01 View Post
I believe my 130 PSI high rolling pressure with the Sailun tires contributed to the 2 cracked rims I experienced. If the tires would have been bled off to stay under 120 PSI rolling, like I normally would have done, then the tire sidewalls would have taken up the flex from the pot hole hit and not transferred all the impact to the rims. Contrary to what most posters say, I will continue to fine tune my tire PSI and they won't exceed 120 working PSI again!!
Never “bleed” or reduce inflation pressure when tires are hot from driving, as it is normal for pressures to increase above recommended cold pressures. If a hot tire pressure reading is at or below recommended cold inflation pressure it may be dangerously under inflated. In this case, immediately determine the cause and/or have the tire checked by a tire service professional.

See page #42 in the RV tire section of the following reference.

https://www.ustires.org/sites/defaul...TruckTires.pdf
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Old 12-27-2019, 08:16 AM   #42
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I believe my 130 PSI high rolling pressure with the Sailun tires contributed to the 2 cracked rims I experienced. If the tires would have been bled off to stay under 120 PSI rolling, like I normally would have done, then the tire sidewalls would have taken up the flex from the pot hole hit and not transferred all the impact to the rims. Contrary to what most posters say, I will continue to fine tune my tire PSI and they won't exceed 120 working PSI again!!





The fact is that tire deflection (bending) is what generates heat.

The faster you drive the faster the bending => more heat
The more load for a constant cold inflation results in more deflection => more heat
The lower the inflation for constant load the more deflection => more heat


Inflation changes by about 2% for each change of 10°F




So if you start off at 100 psi and end up at 120 psi then bleed off 5 hot psi you will get more deflection which generates more heat. Increased heat degrades the rubber and artificially ages the tire so the rubber doesn't bend as easily so it cracks. cracks NEVER repair themselves they just get bigger. Eventually you can end up with a belt detachment.


OK you were warned.
Please don't come back here is a year or so complaining about tire failures.


Have a good New Year
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