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Old 12-21-2019, 02:53 PM   #15
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A bunkhouse TT with barely over 1000 lb of cargo capacity? How the heck is that supposed to work?

I'd pass on it for that alone.
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Old 12-21-2019, 03:43 PM   #16
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Wow, 2,020lbs of payload is nothing to sneeze at. That is a really good. I see you do not have 'E' rated tires but 'T' rated. Do you know what other packages are on your truck. 'T' rated tires I think are special. My truck had a 1,550 lb payload.
No, that is the required tire SPEED rating. 118MPH vs the traditional 106 MPH R rated tires on most pickups. Since these are pretty darn low profile tires for a truck it is normal.
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Old 12-21-2019, 11:30 PM   #17
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It's a unicorn, F150 with the HDPP package, very rare. 2010 to 2014 they were easier to spot because they had 7 lug wheels.
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Old 12-22-2019, 04:00 AM   #18
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That is not a F-150 with the HDPP package, is it? Those trucks have a 2,300lb payload and 'E' rated load carrying tires. Would a Work Truck have a 2,020lb payload? Work Trucks will have a 6.5' bed and a longer wheelbase. That makes it great for towing.

Wait, a work truck would not have those fancy tires. Is it a spiffed up work truck?

Aaron - I am trying to figure out what F-150 you have because most F-150's are in the 1,500 - 1,700 lb payload capacity.
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Old 12-22-2019, 06:03 AM   #19
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Aaron - I am trying to figure out what F-150 you have because most F-150's are in the 1,500 - 1,700 lb payload capacity.
Good question. This truck shows the fallacy of using a high gvwr as a payload ...but puts it on a small 3800 lb rated rear axle (rawr). This has and will overload his and other F150 owners small 3800 rawr
Most F150 have a 6800 gvwr and 3800 rawr. Those small axle rating are good for around 1400-1600 lbs in the bed payloads.

I see other F150 owners with a 7050 gvwr and 3800 rawr say their high 2k gvwr payload sticker over loaded their truck 3800 rawr.

Same scenario with Fords advertizing the F150HDPP with a 4800 rawr at 3200+ lb payloads. These sc or cc trucks empty rear axle weight may run in the 2300-2400 lbs range (actual scale weights). Now add those big 3200 lb gvwr based payloads in the bed or rear bumper = 5500-5600 lbs on the rear axle for a big over load.
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Old 12-22-2019, 06:03 AM   #20
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That is not a F-150 with the HDPP package, is it? Those trucks have a 2,300lb payload and 'E' rated load carrying tires. Would a Work Truck have a 2,020lb payload? Work Trucks will have a 6.5' bed and a longer wheelbase. That makes it great for towing.

Wait, a work truck would not have those fancy tires. Is it a spiffed up work truck?

Aaron - I am trying to figure out what F-150 you have because most F-150's are in the 1,500 - 1,700 lb payload capacity.
Not a work truck per se. my dad built the truck at the dealer and had it set up for towing a utility trailer. Besides the 7050 package, there where options on the transmission. Interesting thing is it still has the 3.31 ratio on the axle so it’s a good daily driver.
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Old 12-24-2019, 07:51 PM   #21
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With that truck I think 7,000lbs and 28' would be ok. Have you looked at the Winnebago Mini trailers. I like those a bit better also better than Jayco.

You got to really look over any trailer you buy. The axles and tires will tell you if the trailer is under built. The more cargo capacity indicates a better frame, axles and tire combination.
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Old 12-25-2019, 03:50 AM   #22
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Oh forgot to tell you to pay $50 extra for a larger battery and battery box. A lager battery is really a nice thing and will last longer.

Typically an RV dealer will use a small crappy group 24 battery and for $40 or $50 dollars more you can get a larger group 29/31 battery.

Deep cycle batteries come in sizes: Group 24, Group 27, Group 29/31. Each step up is a better battery. If you were buying new the cost is $119, $129, and $139 the last time I priced batteries. Then you need a larger battery box. The larger battery has much more reserve capacity and will last longer the the small group 24. Even if you do not boondock a larger battery is a good idea since it will last a few years longer.
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