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Old 02-26-2019, 08:38 AM   #1
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Late model F150 “towing” mirrors (packages)

I have a 17 Screw 2.7 ecoboost and am thinking about a used travel trailer in the ~9k# range. Will be upgrading my truck and would like to stay half ton(F150). I’m confused a bit by the various packages and want to have an idea before I start shopping.

My current 150 has the basic side mirrors. I’ve seen the extended mirrors like the 250 has and there’s also the new BLIS system/mirrors. Those of you towing with a 150 what mirrors do you have and how do they work.
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Old 02-26-2019, 08:52 AM   #2
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I added these to my 16 f150. Easy to install and worked with the defrost, and the power adjustment. You have to manually extend however.

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Old 02-26-2019, 10:37 AM   #3
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On my 2012 Lariat, I replaced the dinky little outside mirrors with Ford OEM tow mirrors that were in the F-150 accessories catalog. On my 2019 Lariat I ordered PowerScope tow mirrors as part of the factory-installed equipment.

PowerScope (power folding and power telescope) tow mirrors require Lariat or above trim, And BLIS is included with Lariat trim, so BLIS is included too.. The optional power tow mirrors available with XLT or XL trim have manual folding and manual telescoping and no BLIS.

Quote:
I have a 17 Screw 2.7 ecoboost and am thinking about a used travel trailer in the ~9k# range. Will be upgrading my truck and would like to stay half ton(F150).
Around ~9k# range is too heavy for most F-150s. You can probably do it without being overloaded only if you order the new truck with the optional heavy duty payload package (HDPP).

But HDPP has restrictions on trim level, bed length and engine availability you may not like. If you cannot configure an F-150 that you would like to own with HDPP within the restrictions, then your best bet for towing a travel trailer in the ~9k# range without being overloaded is to move up to a SuperDuty pickup.

HDPP on F-150 increases GVWR to 7,850 pounds. Includes LT load range C tires and special 18" wheels, upgraded springs, 9.75" gear set with 3.73 e-locker axle, 36-gallon gas tank. It requires the max tow pkg if ordered with 3.5L EcoBoost engine, or regular tow pkg if ordered with 5.0L engine. Other engines not available. HDPP requires the "long" bed, either 6.5' on a SuperCrew, or 8' on SuperCab or regular cab. And the fanciest trim level available is XLT mid-level (301A)

You want the max tow pkg along with the HDPP, and max tow requires the 3.5L EcoBoost engine. But if you like your 2.7L, you'll love the 3.5L. Max tow adds the integrated trailer brake controller, but not the tow mirrors. So be certain to order the tow mirrors as a stand-alone option. And 4x4 is optional with HDPP, so if you want 4x4 it's available.

The new Ford F-150 order guide has all the nitty-gritty details about ordering an F-150 with HDPP:
https://www.f150forum.com/attachment...ide-081318.pdf
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Old 02-26-2019, 03:06 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
On my 2012 Lariat, I replaced the dinky little outside mirrors with Ford OEM tow mirrors that were in the F-150 accessories catalog. On my 2019 Lariat I ordered PowerScope tow mirrors as part of the factory-installed equipment.

PowerScope (power folding and power telescope) tow mirrors require Lariat or above trim, And BLIS is included with Lariat trim, so BLIS is included too.. The optional power tow mirrors available with XLT or XL trim have manual folding and manual telescoping and no BLIS.



Around ~9k# range is too heavy for most F-150s. You can probably do it without being overloaded only if you order the new truck with the optional heavy duty payload package (HDPP).

But HDPP has restrictions on trim level, bed length and engine availability you may not like. If you cannot configure an F-150 that you would like to own with HDPP within the restrictions, then your best bet for towing a travel trailer in the ~9k# range without being overloaded is to move up to a SuperDuty pickup.

HDPP on F-150 increases GVWR to 7,850 pounds. Includes LT load range C tires and special 18" wheels, upgraded springs, 9.75" gear set with 3.73 e-locker axle, 36-gallon gas tank. It requires the max tow pkg if ordered with 3.5L EcoBoost engine, or regular tow pkg if ordered with 5.0L engine. Other engines not available. HDPP requires the "long" bed, either 6.5' on a SuperCrew, or 8' on SuperCab or regular cab. And the fanciest trim level available is XLT mid-level (301A)

You want the max tow pkg along with the HDPP, and max tow requires the 3.5L EcoBoost engine. But if you like your 2.7L, you'll love the 3.5L. Max tow adds the integrated trailer brake controller, but not the tow mirrors. So be certain to order the tow mirrors as a stand-alone option. And 4x4 is optional with HDPP, so if you want 4x4 it's available.

The new Ford F-150 order guide has all the nitty-gritty details about ordering an F-150 with HDPP:
https://www.f150forum.com/attachment...ide-081318.pdf
Great info. Thanks! I won’t be at 9k off the bat but figure one move up and I will. I really want to avoid the hdpp for all the reasons you noted plus I don’t want to order. F250 probably way to go.
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Old 03-04-2019, 08:31 AM   #5
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I have a '17 F150 with a 2030 lbs payload capacity and the 3.5 ecoboost... I wouldn't tow a 9000 lbs trailer. The engine can handle it but suspension isn't made for it.
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Old 03-04-2019, 01:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
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I have a '17 F150 with a 2030 lbs payload capacity and the 3.5 ecoboost... I wouldn't tow a 9000 lbs trailer. The engine can handle it but suspension isn't made for it.
The F-150 suspension is "made for it" if you don't exceed GVWR or payload capacity. A properly loaded 9,000 lb. TT will have about 1,250 lb. hitch weight (including 13% TW and a 100-pound WD hitch). Max payload of 2,030 minus 1,250 hitch weight leaves 780 pounds payload available for people and other weight.

Granted, with a family of Daddy, Mommy, two small kids and Rover in the truck, you'd have to pay attention to details to not be overloaded when on the road with a full tank of gas and minimum toys and tools. But that's why they make CAT scales. Weigh your wet and loaded rig and be sure you're not overloaded when towing.

How can you tell if you're overloaded? Add the weights on the steer and drive axles of the F-150 to get GVW. Compare GVW to GVWR. If GVW is more than GVWR, you're overloaded.
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Old 03-04-2019, 05:31 PM   #7
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You can pull the 9000lbs with a 150, BUT it surely isn't advisable or safe. I pulled 8000 lbs with my 150 for three years and we got by but never had an incident where I needed all the truck could handle, braking and handling. I went to a 250 and couldn't believe the difference. More truck than you need is always better than living on the edges. Especially when the family is involved. Live and learn!
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Old 03-05-2019, 03:08 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
The F-150 suspension is "made for it" if you don't exceed GVWR or payload capacity. A properly loaded 9,000 lb. TT will have about 1,250 lb. hitch weight (including 13% TW and a 100-pound WD hitch). Max payload of 2,030 minus 1,250 hitch weight leaves 780 pounds payload available for people and other weight.

Granted, with a family of Daddy, Mommy, two small kids and Rover in the truck, you'd have to pay attention to details to not be overloaded when on the road with a full tank of gas and minimum toys and tools. But that's why they make CAT scales. Weigh your wet and loaded rig and be sure you're not overloaded when towing.

How can you tell if you're overloaded? Add the weights on the steer and drive axles of the F-150 to get GVW. Compare GVW to GVWR. If GVW is more than GVWR, you're overloaded.
Thanks. I want to stay with the F150 and if so would be the 3.5 eb Screw with max tow which is what you’re running? GVWR 7k, curb ~5k, tow 10,200 I believe?

Trailer I have my eyes on (Winnebago One 26RG) is 6300 dry/8800 wet/ccc 2000. Wife, me and dog at 400 lbs.

I think I’d be good, no?

Don’t want to go F250, would rather go smaller tv (I think).
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Old 03-05-2019, 03:33 PM   #9
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Thanks. I want to stay with the F150 and if so would be the 3.5 eb Screw with max tow which is what you’re running? GVWR 7k, curb ~5k, tow 10,200 I believe?

Trailer I have my eyes on (Winnebago One 26RG) is 6300 dry/8800 wet/ccc 2000. Wife, me and dog at 400 lbs.

I think I’d be good, no?

Don’t want to go F250, would rather go smaller tv (I think).
That's about the weight I tow with my 2017. It's gotten much better with endurance tires on the trailer and e rater tires on the truck. Power and stopping isn't an issue. The wind and semis we're the issue but it's better now. Probably wouldn't head into the mountains but I'll go just about anywhere else. I don't want anymore length or weight though.

Truck has 2040 payload
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyWren View Post
The F-150 suspension is "made for it" if you don't exceed GVWR or payload capacity. A properly loaded 9,000 lb. TT will have about 1,250 lb. hitch weight (including 13% TW and a 100-pound WD hitch). Max payload of 2,030 minus 1,250 hitch weight leaves 780 pounds payload available for people and other weight.
I think you're just looking at the spec sheets and not considering real life. 1250lbs on the tongue of a standard F150 (not the high payload version), would drop the rear end more than four inches. At that point, any bumps on the road slams the bump stops against the axle. Some of that may be mitigated by a WDH, but not to the point where you're still not dragging the rear end.

So no, it's not made for it, even if it's technically capable of handling the weight.
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Old 03-06-2019, 04:36 AM   #11
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I think you're just looking at the spec sheets and not considering real life. 1250lbs on the tongue of a standard F150 (not the high payload version), would drop the rear end more than four inches. At that point, any bumps on the road slams the bump stops against the axle. Some of that may be mitigated by a WDH, but not to the point where you're still not dragging the rear end.

So no, it's not made for it, even if it's technically capable of handling the weight.
Not arguing here, not with experts anyway, just asking...

With a gvwr over 2000 the uvw of 6600 AFTER full tanks of water and propane, it seems like a couple could easily stay way under the gvwr with normal gear. Could run with half tank water. Could have hitch weight of 10% vs 13% too. Seems like I’d be ~900 hitch vs 1200. No?
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Old 03-06-2019, 09:34 AM   #12
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1250lbs on the tongue of a standard F150 (not the high payload version), would drop the rear end more than four inches. At that point, any bumps on the road slams the bump stops against the axle. Some of that may be mitigated by a WDH, but not to the point where you're still not dragging the rear end.
Depends on the WDH. With a cheap or undersized WDH, you're right. But with a good WDH such as an Equal-I-Zer or Blue Ox SwayPro or Reese Strait-Line rated for a max of 1,400 pounds tongue weight, properly adjusted to return the front end height back to near the unloaded height, you won't have that much sag in the rear end. A properly-adjusted WD hitch will leave only about 50% to 60% of tongue weight on the rear axle. So that 1,250 pounds of tongue weight gets distributed so that at most 750 pounds of weight is on the rear axle.
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Old 03-06-2019, 09:43 AM   #13
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Could have hitch weight of 10% vs 13% too. Seems like I’d be ~900 hitch vs 1200. No?
No. With a TT, you want 12% to 14% tongue weight to help eliminate trailer sway. 13% is average, but settle for 12% if that's convenient. Don't even think about 10% TW on a travel trailer.
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Old 03-06-2019, 09:47 AM   #14
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Depends on the WDH. With a cheap or undersized WDH, you're right. But with a good WDH such as an Equal-I-Zer or Blue Ox SwayPro or Reese Strait-Line rated for a max of 1,400 pounds tongue weight, properly adjusted to return the front end height back to near the unloaded height, you won't have that much sag in the rear end. A properly-adjusted WD hitch will leave only about 50% to 60% of tongue weight on the rear axle. So that 1,250 pounds of tongue weight gets distributed so that at most 750 pounds of weight is on the rear axle.
So with a properly adjusted good wdh tongue weight wouldn’t be as much as an issue in my case? 1200 is a no-no but 750...?
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