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Old 07-28-2021, 11:41 PM   #29
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Good info OP and welcome.... let me apologize for my fellow regulars that sit at their computers 24/7 and expect everyone else to do the same. I don't think it's as exact a science as many make it out to be. Basically, tire rating and pressure is like religion, political affiliation or favorite news channel.... and you know how that story ends.

Your question about higher load rating at reduced PSI vs. lower load rating at max PSI is a good one that you'll likely only get opinions. Obviously, you've done your research and your understanding of the important points is better than 99% of the people out there. Good job for that. My personal take on the subject is that upsizing one load rating on a rim or running a given tire at one rating reduced PSI it fine and very unlikely to ever cause a problem. Much more than that and you're either overdoing it or stretching the limitations of your equipment.
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Old 07-29-2021, 08:52 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtofell View Post
Good info OP and welcome.... let me apologize for my fellow regulars that sit at their computers 24/7 and expect everyone else to do the same. I don't think it's as exact a science as many make it out to be. Basically, tire rating and pressure is like religion, political affiliation or favorite news channel.... and you know how that story ends.

Your question about higher load rating at reduced PSI vs. lower load rating at max PSI is a good one that you'll likely only get opinions. Obviously, you've done your research and your understanding of the important points is better than 99% of the people out there. Good job for that. My personal take on the subject is that upsizing one load rating on a rim or running a given tire at one rating reduced PSI it fine and very unlikely to ever cause a problem. Much more than that and you're either overdoing it or stretching the limitations of your equipment.
Thanks for the kinds words. I'm not a newbie to forums in general -- I realize everyone who is responding is doing me a favor and at times gets tired of having to restate the same things time and again.

I agree it does seem to make sense to stay reasonably close to the mfg. load rating, all things equal, because as you venture further away, you are using equipment in a way it may not have been intended to be used. Perhaps in hindsight I should have gone to an E-rated Endurance rather than the Transeagles to minimize this risk.

That said, since I feel like I have a good idea of what to watch for, namely tread bulge due to interply shear and overheating (Roger Marble's website is a fantastic resource, thanks whoever provided that link!), I'm going to give these a go at a PSI that both the tire and rims can handle, and watch closely. I don't anticipate a problem and maybe the added durability of the tire will give me some additional margin against road hazards.

Cheers!
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Old 07-29-2021, 10:01 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by mtofell View Post
Good info OP and welcome.... let me apologize for my fellow regulars that sit at their computers 24/7 and expect everyone else to do the same. I don't think it's as exact a science as many make it out to be. Basically, tire rating and pressure is like religion, political affiliation or favorite news channel.... and you know how that story ends.

Your question about higher load rating at reduced PSI vs. lower load rating at max PSI is a good one that you'll likely only get opinions. Obviously, you've done your research and your understanding of the important points is better than 99% of the people out there. Good job for that. My personal take on the subject is that upsizing one load rating on a rim or running a given tire at one rating reduced PSI it fine and very unlikely to ever cause a problem. Much more than that and you're either overdoing it or stretching the limitations of your equipment.
Op didn't upsize ONE load rating
Went from a 'D' rating to a 'G' rated...that is upsizing 3 load ratings (E, F, G)
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Old 07-29-2021, 11:27 AM   #32
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Op didn't upsize ONE load rating
Went from a 'D' rating to a 'G' rated...that is upsizing 3 load ratings (E, F, G)
Are you calling me fat?

I think you're calling me fat.

I'll admit I'm maybe 15 lbs overweight, but you should see my trailer tires -- massive!
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Old 07-29-2021, 01:12 PM   #33
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Quote:
One question -- when you say "overtiring will gain me nothing", please clarify this for me, if you don't mind.
Reread what I said...quote :: "Over tiring a small trailer with load G tires will gain you nothing over a quality OEM size and OEM load range tire."

Your under the mistaking idea , as some rv trailer owners, the thicker G tires sidewall is better than a quality OEM size D or C tire will be. There are reasons why the trailer mfg and axle mfg and tire experts don't recommend over tiring any trailer from a small load D tire to a load G tire nor do they recommend over loading or over pressuring a tire or whee..
Like myself and others are saying a small upgrade in capacity or maybe one load range in a quality tire will give you a longer lasting tire. And all that depends on axle size and axle loads.

Your 15" 6 lug wheel have a 2830 lb load rating which = a 15" load E at 80 psi which is the max pressure the for the wheel.

Tire selection for replacement tires on trailers has always been a hot topic for reasons I mentioned above about differing experience in those with opinions experience on the subject. As you find out everyone has a opinion regardless of any experience with the subject.
There is and has always been more too tire selection for a trailer than the tow vehicle than some rv owners realize. IMO mainly because they don't pull their trailers enough to wear the tires completely out.

Take some time and go through rvtiresafety/Tirman9 blog on tires for trailers (selecting/max sidewall pressures/load range selections/and more than you ever thought/etc). Not much in common with tires on other vehicles other than their round and black.
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Old 07-30-2021, 07:22 AM   #34
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TransEagle ST Radial 225/75R15 Load Inflation Chart

Last night I received the load inflation chart via email from TransAmerica, the manufacturer of my trailer tire. It looks pretty standard when compared to other G-rated trailer tire charts, as expected. Since I haven't found this online anywhere, I figured I'd post it and be descriptive, so hopefully anyone looking via Google can find it.


Transeagle ST Radial All Steel ST 225/75R15 124/121L G (14 Ply) Trailer Tire


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Old 07-30-2021, 10:35 PM   #35
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If you have a tire of a size and load range recommended by the manufacturer, or possibly one load range heavier, you have a tire that will flex and absorb some of the shock from the tire impacting the road, potholes, rocks, bridge bumps, etc. The tire is part of your suspension and it absorbs this rather than transmitting it on to the spindle and axle and springs and trailer frame.

Jumping up three load ranges is like installing Fred Flintstone tires on the trailer. All of the road shock gets sent on to the spindle and axle and its my guess that it would be much easier to bend a spindle or axle, or even break a spring or hanger than with the proper tires.

Charles
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Old 07-31-2021, 04:15 AM   #36
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Because you have used replacement tires of the same designated size as the original equipment tires makes the vehicle manufacturer's recommended cold inflation pressures valid. Load range has nothing to do with a tire's size.

Some confuse durability with strength. Because the replacements are steel cased they are probably more durable than the polyester LRD tires.

The higher load range allows for more load capacity with increased inflation pressure. There is no reason to inflate the replacements beyond 80 PSI unless the owner wants more load capacity reserves than what the 80 PSI will provide.

The maximum load capacity for almost all LRG tires is 110 PSI. There is no valid reason to use the maximum 110 PSI on a trailer that had OE tires of the same size with a LRD rating, which provides its maximum load capacity at 65 PSI. The LRG provides that same load capacity at 65 PSI with the LRG tires.
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Old 08-01-2021, 03:02 PM   #37
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Another good double check from my drag racing 60s. Chalk line accross each tire (can use paint but brush as spray gets down into treads and stays FOREVER) run for a while and see where it has worn off of the tires.
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Old 08-01-2021, 03:29 PM   #38
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If not mentioned, you must use a tire pressure monitor. I like the Tireminder because it displays all tire pressures at once. Otherwise the only notice of a tire failure will be someone driving alongside hollering you are on the rim.
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Old 08-01-2021, 03:54 PM   #39
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I would definitely be worried about this choice, along with almost all trailer tires. They’re all made in China! When ever you see a trailer on the side of the road with a blowout, 99% of the time it’s a Chinese trailer tire that isn’t rated for over 65 mph, and probably not rated for the weight it’s hauling. I was a victim 1 time. At that point I put new 16” wheels and 10 ply truck tires on my toy hauler. After that, I change every trailer tire to truck tires emediately!
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Old 08-01-2021, 04:09 PM   #40
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Just got off the phone with a lady at Dexstar, who manufactured my tt wheels. I was calling to get the details on the PSI rating of my wheels (I recently purchased upgraded 14-ply, all steel radial, G-rated tires that can handle up to 110psi). Dexstar publishes load ratings (in lbs) for all their wheels on their website, but the pressure rating is nowhere to be found on their site.

Given that my 15" wheels have a load rating of 2860 lbs, I expected to be told they had a PSI rating of approx. 80lbs, but she informed me that while this is a common concern, they removed all PSI ratings from their website several years ago, as they are concerned only with the load on the wheels. "The tires will give out long before there is any issue with the steel wheels due to pressure".

Bottom line, she green-lit me to run a full 110psi on my 15" wheels with a 2860lb load rating. I was planning to run the new tires at 80 psi, given that the tires will still be approx. E-rated at that pressure, but now I'm tempted to throw on high-pressure valve stems and air them up to the max G-rated pressure of 110psi.

Thoughts?
Surely there must be a OEM sticker that indicates the recommended pressure. Otherwise, why not just put 30 PSI in them and call it good enough?
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Old 08-01-2021, 04:20 PM   #41
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My calc comes to 87 psi advice pressure.
Used 4900lbs total weight, only 300lbs on towbar to simulate WDH used, so more load on axle. loadindex 121 AT 110 psi.

A higher loadrange needs higher pressure for the same load, to laws of nature. If you use same pressure it will overheat, and that may only happen ZERO times in a tire life., but is not directly punished by blowing tire, sometimes after 3 years.

American pressure/ loadcapacity- lists give all the loadranges of same sise in one list, and I dare to state that is wrong. Europe makes seperate lists for every loadrange( called plyrating here in Europe).

In Europe only maxload of rimms is given , and even respected poster Capriracer wrote once about max pressure of rimm is not that important, only maxload.

But did you read 2860 lbs maxload on rimm, or dit you make that of the E- load tires maxload?
Would be loadindex 117.

Edit: used the wrong loadindex , was 124 for single, but ST is calculated for 65mph, so to give it same deflection as LT , calculated for 99mph, 6 LI steps should be substracted, and would give even 96 psi advice.
But tgen the ST E- load would also calculate higher pressure advice.
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Old 08-01-2021, 04:59 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by FastEagle View Post
Because you have used replacement tires of the same designated size as the original equipment tires makes the vehicle manufacturer's recommended cold inflation pressures valid. Load range has nothing to do with a tire's size.

Some confuse durability with strength. Because the replacements are steel cased they are probably more durable than the polyester LRD tires.

The higher load range allows for more load capacity with increased inflation pressure. There is no reason to inflate the replacements beyond 80 PSI unless the owner wants more load capacity reserves than what the 80 PSI will provide.

The maximum load capacity for almost all LRG tires is 110 PSI. There is no valid reason to use the maximum 110 PSI on a trailer that had OE tires of the same size with a LRD rating, which provides its maximum load capacity at 65 PSI. The LRG provides that same load capacity at 65 PSI with the LRG tires.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jadatis View Post
My calc comes to 87 psi advice pressure.
Used 4900lbs total weight, only 300lbs on towbar to simulate WDH used, so more load on axle. loadindex 121 AT 110 psi.

A higher loadrange needs higher pressure for the same load, to laws of nature. If you use same pressure it will overheat, and that may only happen ZERO times in a tire life., but is not directly punished by blowing tire, sometimes after 3 years.

American pressure/ loadcapacity- lists give all the loadranges of same sise in one list, and I dare to state that is wrong. Europe makes seperate lists for every loadrange( called plyrating here in Europe).

In Europe only maxload of rimms is given , and even respected poster Capriracer wrote once about max pressure of rimm is not that important, only maxload.

But did you read 2860 lbs maxload on rimm, or dit you make that of the E- load tires maxload?
Would be loadindex 117.

Edit: used the wrong loadindex , was 124 for single, but ST is calculated for 65mph, so to give it same deflection as LT , calculated for 99mph, 6 LI steps should be substracted, and would give even 96 psi advice.
But tgen the ST E- load would also calculate higher pressure advice.
OP has a single axle trailer that used 'D' rated tires OEM

WHAT benefit does upsizing load rating from 'D' to a 'G' and then run those higher load rated tires at pressure comparable to a 'E' rated tire?
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