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Old 05-23-2022, 08:22 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Texas Sooner View Post
We just purchased a new GMC 3500 DRW and now we can start looking for the "right" 5th wheel for us. In the meantime, we are taking our truck and current travel trailer down to the Escapee park in Livingston, Texas to take advantage of their SmartWeigh program. We did this with our previous TV and it was very informative and reassuring to know that we were within the limits (barely) for both our TV and our trailer. With this new truck, I'm not concerned about TV weights at all but I still would like to know what the weight of our truck is when it's loaded up for a trip (full fuel, passengers, cargo, etc) so that I can use that in the future when we're figuring out the weight of a new 5th wheeler.

One of the things that they require at SmartWeigh is to know the load range and tire pressures for your tires. I was able to find that out for the tires on my previous TV but can't seem to find out anything on the tires on this truck. It has Michelin Primacy XC tires - all six are 235/80R17 120/117R TPC BSW. When I go to the Michelin site I can find the tires listed there, but I can't find any reference or link to a load chart. The Tire and Loading placard (photo attached) on the door sill states cold tire pressure is 80 lbs for all six tires. The tire sidewall says that they are Load Range E, and the max load single is 3085 lbs at 80 psi and the max load dual is 2835 lbs at 80 psi (photo attached).

So, am I supposed to run the tires at 80 lbs at all times - whether the truck is empty or when it's towing? On my previous TV, the tire load chart had me running the tires at 35 lbs when empty, and then 44 lbs when towing our trailer. If someone can find a Load & Pressure chart specific to these tires I would appreciate it. It's probably there and easy to find but somehow I'm just missing it as I'm not familiar with the Michelin website - always had Goodyear in the past. If not, then some recommendations and advice would be most helpful. I want to fully understand this tire pressure situation so that we have the most comfortable ride when not towing, and the safest ride when towing - all while maximizing the life of these tires. At $300 each, I want them to last as long as possible.

Also, when I was looking for the DOT date codes on each tire I would only find them on two tires (photos with and without attached). The two that I could find them on have the same date (1022) so that tells me that they were manufactured during the 10th week (March 7th) of this year which makes sense since my truck came off the assembly line right after that.

Lastly, how often should I rotate the tires, and what is the proper rotational pattern for duallys? Thanks in advance for everyone's help!
A load rating chart for any LT235/80R17 will suffice, it's not really that brand and model specific. 80psi unladen on the rear will produce quite a harsh ride. I've done it with my dually and all it does it create new rattles and squeaks, maybe loosen some fillings too.

Playing with tire pressure on a dually is a hassle. I found an intermediate setting that allows plenty of load capacity and a decent ride unladen too. For me, that's 65psi front and 60psi rear, but mine has a light gas engine. Only way to know for sure is get scale readings for each axle.

Once you know which trailer you'll get, weigh it, then adjust pressures accordingly. Sure, 80 psi all around will carry anything, but it's harsh.

DOT #s are only stamped on one side of the tire. If you don't see the last 4 of the DOT# on the tire, look on the inside, at the same place as the stamping on the other side, it'll be there. They are likely all the same date code or sithing a week or two at most.

Rotation; I rotate mine with every service, but I have steelies with chrome simulators. Alloys look nice, but on a dually are a royal PITA. You will be limited on rotations depending on wheel style (if front and rear alloys are different), and if you really need rotation, will have to mount and dismount, which will cost $$$. All alloy wheel duallies that I've seen have steel inners, so that also complicates things. I rotate every 10 000km or so.

Tireman, I've never seen anything but LT load range E 235/80R17s. You can see it in the pics on the 1st post of the thread, both visible on the tire and placard sticker. I think you'd agree 80 psi empty is a bit much, but probably OK if hauling a monster 20000lb+ unit.
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Old 05-23-2022, 11:16 AM   #16
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When I first bought my dually, I had the tires rotated per the manufacturer's recommendation. Even though all six of my steel wheels are the same, the tire shop still had to remove and remount two tires because the white sidewall markings would be exposed on two wheels. Now, like others, I just leave them alone.

One thing I am anal about is making sure the air pressures in the inner and outer tires are identical.
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Old 05-24-2022, 09:34 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by kdauto View Post
A load rating chart for any LT235/80R17 will suffice, it's not really that brand and model specific. 80psi unladen on the rear will produce quite a harsh ride. I've done it with my dually and all it does it create new rattles and squeaks, maybe loosen some fillings too.

Playing with tire pressure on a dually is a hassle. I found an intermediate setting that allows plenty of load capacity and a decent ride unladen too. For me, that's 65psi front and 60psi rear, but mine has a light gas engine. Only way to know for sure is get scale readings for each axle.

Once you know which trailer you'll get, weigh it, then adjust pressures accordingly. Sure, 80 psi all around will carry anything, but it's harsh.

DOT #s are only stamped on one side of the tire. If you don't see the last 4 of the DOT# on the tire, look on the inside, at the same place as the stamping on the other side, it'll be there. They are likely all the same date code or sithing a week or two at most.

Rotation; I rotate mine with every service, but I have steelies with chrome simulators. Alloys look nice, but on a dually are a royal PITA. You will be limited on rotations depending on wheel style (if front and rear alloys are different), and if you really need rotation, will have to mount and dismount, which will cost $$$. All alloy wheel duallies that I've seen have steel inners, so that also complicates things. I rotate every 10 000km or so.

Tireman, I've never seen anything but LT load range E 235/80R17s. You can see it in the pics on the 1st post of the thread, both visible on the tire and placard sticker. I think you'd agree 80 psi empty is a bit much, but probably OK if hauling a monster 20000lb+ unit.
Well said, as usual. I run 75psi in my fronts because my Cummins is very heavy and usually keep the rears at 60 - 65.

For rotation, I have steel wheels so they are all interchangeable. Alloys look nice but complicate things so I stuck with steel.


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Old 05-25-2022, 07:20 AM   #18
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Well said, as usual. I run 75psi in my fronts because my Cummins is very heavy and usually keep the rears at 60 - 65.

For rotation, I have steel wheels so they are all interchangeable. Alloys look nice but complicate things so I stuck with steel.


Dave

Yes definately get on truck scales with the trailer hooked up and fully loaded. While you are at it learn the axle loads on each axle of truck and trailer. Then you can confirm the MINIMUM inflation needed to support your actual load.
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Old 05-25-2022, 09:38 AM   #19
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Yes definately get on truck scales with the trailer hooked up and fully loaded. While you are at it learn the axle loads on each axle of truck and trailer. Then you can confirm the MINIMUM inflation needed to support your actual load.
I do that but I find that the minimum pressures I need to support my load are typically far lower than I'm comfortable with. For eg. my rear axle weighs 5600 lbs loaded. My DRW tires only need 35psi (minimum) to carry 1570 lbs (that's the lowest the chart goes) and my load is only 1400 lbs per tire......I realize that the chart only shows the MINIMUM psi required but I run no less than 60psi as I'm concerned about handling, heat, etc. ....I'd be interested to hear your thoughts.

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Old 05-25-2022, 05:19 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by kdauto View Post
A load rating chart for any LT235/80R17 will suffice, it's not really that brand and model specific.
I emailed Michelin, BF Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone, and Bridgestone requesting a Load and Inflation chart for their LT235/80R17 tires. Several responded that they didn't have one - just go by what's on the tire's sidewall. However, I did hear back from Goodyear, and here is what they sent to me:
Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar Size 235/80R17 Load and Inflation Chart.

Pressure Max Load Single Tire
35 psi 1725 lbs.
40 psi 1895 lbs.
45 psi 2055 lbs.
50 psi 2270 lbs.
55 psi 2370 lbs.
60 psi 2515 lbs.
65 psi 2680 lbs.
70 psi 2805 lbs.
75 psi 2940 lbs.
80 psi 3085 lbs. (E) 120
Next, I need to take my truck to a scale to see what it weighs, especially on the front axle with the Duramax diesel. Then I will know what to keep those tires inflated to without a trailer. Like I originally posted, I will be heading down next week to the Escapees park in Livingston for a SmartWeigh and then I will know exactly what the weights on each of the truck tires are with our trailer hooked up. I can then adjust the pressures accordingly.

Thanks for the recommendation to check with other tire manufacturers to get their Load and Inflation charts! Once I get all of my weights I will post them as an FYI.
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Old 05-26-2022, 01:53 PM   #21
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I do that but I find that the minimum pressures I need to support my load are typically far lower than I'm comfortable with. For eg. my rear axle weighs 5600 lbs loaded. My DRW tires only need 35psi (minimum) to carry 1570 lbs (that's the lowest the chart goes) and my load is only 1400 lbs per tire......I realize that the chart only shows the MINIMUM psi required but I run no less than 60psi as I'm concerned about handling, heat, etc. ....I'd be interested to hear your thoughts.

Dave

What does your Certification sticker show? Many times cars and trucks have higher inflation specified than necessary to support the load as the car Co. engineers are also shooting for braking, turning and handling response along with MPG.
I see no problem with 65 but what does the sticker say?
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Old 05-28-2022, 05:28 PM   #22
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Load and Pressure Chart update

I have now heard back from four tire manufacturers - Michelin, Goodyear, BF Goodrich, and Cooper. All four had the same Load and Pressure recommendations for single tires, and have posted those numbers above. Cooper Tires was the only one to provide both single and dual wheel recommendations:
Cooper Tires Discoverer HT3 LT235/80R17

Pressure Max Load Single Tire

35 psi 1725 lbs.
40 psi 1895 lbs.
45 psi 2055 lbs.
50 psi 2270 lbs.
55 psi 2370 lbs.
60 psi 2515 lbs.
65 psi 2680 lbs.
70 psi 2805 lbs.
75 psi 2940 lbs.
80 psi 3085 lbs.


Pressure Max Load Dual Tire

35 psi 1570 lbs.
40 psi 1725 lbs.
45 psi 1870 lbs.
50 psi 2040 lbs.
55 psi 2155 lbs.
60 psi 2290 lbs.
65 psi 2470 lbs.
70 psi 2555 lbs.
75 psi 2675 lbs.
80 psi 2835 lbs.
I am assuming that once I know the weight on my rear axle I would adjust the tire pressure of those four tires using the dual-tire recommendations above. I would use the single-tire pressure recommendation for my front axle. And if someone did not have a DRW axle they would also use the single-tire chart for their rear axle. Let me know if I understand this correctly.
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Old 05-29-2022, 02:51 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Texas Sooner View Post
We just purchased a new GMC 3500 DRW and now we can start looking for the "right" 5th wheel for us. In the meantime, we are taking our truck and current travel trailer down to the Escapee park in Livingston, Texas to take advantage of their SmartWeigh program. We did this with our previous TV and it was very informative and reassuring to know that we were within the limits (barely) for both our TV and our trailer. With this new truck, I'm not concerned about TV weights at all but I still would like to know what the weight of our truck is when it's loaded up for a trip (full fuel, passengers, cargo, etc) so that I can use that in the future when we're figuring out the weight of a new 5th wheeler.

One of the things that they require at SmartWeigh is to know the load range and tire pressures for your tires. I was able to find that out for the tires on my previous TV but can't seem to find out anything on the tires on this truck. It has Michelin Primacy XC tires - all six are 235/80R17 120/117R TPC BSW. When I go to the Michelin site I can find the tires listed there, but I can't find any reference or link to a load chart. The Tire and Loading placard (photo attached) on the door sill states cold tire pressure is 80 lbs for all six tires. The tire sidewall says that they are Load Range E, and the max load single is 3085 lbs at 80 psi and the max load dual is 2835 lbs at 80 psi (photo attached).

So, am I supposed to run the tires at 80 lbs at all times - whether the truck is empty or when it's towing? On my previous TV, the tire load chart had me running the tires at 35 lbs when empty, and then 44 lbs when towing our trailer. If someone can find a Load & Pressure chart specific to these tires I would appreciate it. It's probably there and easy to find but somehow I'm just missing it as I'm not familiar with the Michelin website - always had Goodyear in the past. If not, then some recommendations and advice would be most helpful. I want to fully understand this tire pressure situation so that we have the most comfortable ride when not towing, and the safest ride when towing - all while maximizing the life of these tires. At $300 each, I want them to last as long as possible.

Also, when I was looking for the DOT date codes on each tire I would only find them on two tires (photos with and without attached). The two that I could find them on have the same date (1022) so that tells me that they were manufactured during the 10th week (March 7th) of this year which makes sense since my truck came off the assembly line right after that.

Lastly, how often should I rotate the tires, and what is the proper rotational pattern for duallys? Thanks in advance for everyone's help!

SOwhy dont you call Michelin and find out, dont rely on all the tire expert wannabes.
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Old 05-29-2022, 03:46 PM   #24
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I have the 2019 GMC 3500 HD Denali dually, slightly different due to your ever so slight increase in towing capacity and drop in cargo capacity. However I run the manufacturer pressures. All the time. I do run Centramaticís on both axles of the truck and both of the 40í ToyHauler axles. Makes a huge difference in tire life. Still on the original rubber although it does get replaced half the year with snow tires. Currently at a smudge over 64,000km. (ToyHauler still on original rubber as well). And for fun, I use the GenY Executive Gooseneck on the trailer to the ball in the truck bed (never going back).
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Old 05-29-2022, 03:55 PM   #25
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I checked the lists , and they are made with the formula used officially for LT in US.
Europe uses for every tirekind the same formula, and leads to lower loadcapacity's .
This european formula is used in US since 2006 also for P-tires, and I discovered now also for trucktires. I ask myself, whynot also for LT, because it takes better care of the same deflection so heatproduction, for all the pressures.
Before 2006 US used a realy bad formula for P-tires,

Will give link to map on my onedrive, that belongs to my hotmail.com adres with username jadatis. In that pressure loadcapacity lists made with an even safer formula then the european. Map for per tire, axle single and axle dual, so you can pic the one you think most handy to use, for every loadrange seperate pdf , and per tire also a compilation of all the loadranges.

Then you can use that for every tire.
https://1drv.ms/f/s!AtzmkuDu4Calhy1JOdG0mFbnyEF9
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Old 05-29-2022, 04:23 PM   #26
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here is a chart: https://tirepressure.com/lt235-80r17-tire-pressure
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Old 05-29-2022, 04:23 PM   #27
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here is a chart https://tirepressure.com/lt235-80r17-tire-pressure
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Old 05-29-2022, 04:24 PM   #28
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Tire inflation loaded depending on the tongue weight. If you get close to your rear axle weight rating, you'll want to be at the 80-85 psi range.



I run 65 rear and 50 front empty, 85 75 loaded



My F350 wears tires pretty well, for rotation, I'll have one side rear dismounted and swap them with the fronts, next rotation uses the other side rears. I get close to 100k from a set of Michelins.
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