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Old 09-29-2022, 07:19 PM   #1
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Jacking/Lifting Trailer for Wheel Bearing/Brake Service?

Hello-

Preparing to complete bearing service in the next few days.
Read owner's manual and it states, "Position a hydraulic jack on the frame close to the spring hanger."

I've also red of others using bottle jacks directly under axle U bolt shackles; perhaps their owner's manual suggested this.

When jacking, I would chock opposing wheels and may even attach tow vehicle for added support.

I have a tandem axle leaf spring set up, with an equalizer between each set of springs.
4400# AL-KO axles. My axles are BELOW leaf springs.

My frame has an underbelly cover and the frame is not completely exposed, (about an inch is exposed on outside edge), and rear axle hangers are several inches in front and about 15" at rear of where I could jack at frame (due to obstructions one frame).

Are there other SAFE options?

NOTE: The trailer will have to be lifted and supported for a few days while I work on bearings/brakes; one side at a time.

Also, where should jack stand be placed? This is not mentioned in owners manual.

What about those plastic wedge aids that you drive trailer onto? I've read mixed reviews about their ability to raise adjacent wheel off ground high enough to remove a flat tire. Read that they are only good for torsion axles and NOT for spring axles.

I can also make set of wood wedges using cut sections of 2"x6" that would work the same way as the plastic ones....but this may not work since the plastic ones appear not made for leaf spring axles.

Also, found this....https://bottlejackbuddy.net/

My jacking goal is to jack up at home and on road safely. Jacking would be for... changing a flat tire, servicing bearings and brakes, or performing other axle/spring work.

Thoughts?

Thanks!
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Old 09-29-2022, 07:42 PM   #2
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At home on the concrete pad in front of the garage I use a floor jack placed under the main frame rail on one side just behind the last axle on a single/tandem or triaxle trailer. That way I can R&R one side at a time.


On the road for changing a flat tire I use a truckers special 12t shorty hyd bottle jack that has a similar axle tube adapter as your clicky that came with the jack. The shorty hyd jack came with a 10" X 10" base for soft side of the road jacking. It came with a 5' handle for cranking and sliding the jack under the axle tubes next to the U bolts on std leaf spring suspension.
The jack raises the end of the axle enough to mount the spare.
' If your trailer has torsion type axles then you may have to jack the frame.

Whichever method you go with make a trial run at home. The side of a busty road isn't the place to find out it didn't work.
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Old 09-29-2022, 08:47 PM   #3
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I had my bearings serviced. I watched the guy jack up the trailer with a 20T bottle jack under the equalizer. Made some sense to me because the that point takes 1/2 of the load from each axle while in motion. The dynamic load while in motion probably is at least 2x the load while the unit is at rest (that's a complete guess). If I was going to leave it in the air for while I might jack it at the equalizer and the place 1 jack stand behind the tires and one in front of them.
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Old 09-29-2022, 09:26 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JIMNLIN View Post
At home on the concrete pad in front of the garage I use a floor jack placed under the main frame rail on one side just behind the last axle on a single/tandem or triaxle trailer. That way I can R&R one side at a time.


On the road for changing a flat tire I use a truckers special 12t shorty hyd bottle jack that has a similar axle tube adapter as your clicky that came with the jack. The shorty hyd jack came with a 10" X 10" base for soft side of the road jacking. It came with a 5' handle for cranking and sliding the jack under the axle tubes next to the U bolts on std leaf spring suspension.
The jack raises the end of the axle enough to mount the spare.
' If your trailer has torsion type axles then you may have to jack the frame.

Whichever method you go with make a trial run at home. The side of a busty road isn't the place to find out it didn't work.

My main frame is approx. 25" from ground. My floor jack rises to a max of about 22". I could use wooden blocks I suppose, but how safe is that? Also, where are you placing jack stands once lifted? If I used a bottle jacked under u bolts, the jack would be in the way of where jack stand should be placed.
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Old 09-29-2022, 10:07 PM   #5
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why can't you just pull the trailer front wheel on one side up on some blocks, 3-4 2x6's. that should lift the rear wheel off the ground. do the opposite for the front then do the other side. my T/T came with a 3 1/2" block cut at a slope on one end. previous owner said that was his jack, i have never used it so?
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Old 09-29-2022, 10:33 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Jay D. View Post
why can't you just pull the trailer front wheel on one side up on some blocks, 3-4 2x6's. that should lift the rear wheel off the ground. do the opposite for the front then do the other side. my T/T came with a 3 1/2" block cut at a slope on one end. previous owner said that was his jack, i have never used it so?
Jay D.
On a leaf spring axle I don't believe the rear wheel will rise. I believe the equalizer leaf spring set up will allow the rear wheel to drop down. That is why the plastic ramp models sold as jacks only work with torsion axles. States on box that they do not work with leaf spring axles.
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Old 09-29-2022, 11:27 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalAngler View Post
On a leaf spring axle I don't believe the rear wheel will rise. I believe the equalizer leaf spring set up will allow the rear wheel to drop down. That is why the plastic ramp models sold as jacks only work with torsion axles. States on box that they do not work with leaf spring axles.
I carry an Andersen Rapid Jack and tested it out after it arrived to verify it would work as expected. I see nothing for the Rapid Jack that says Torsion axles only. No problem lifting the rear wheel on my camper that has a MorRyde CRE-3000 on it. The one thing I will note is that you do need to be quite level in order for it to work well - something you may not be able to accommodate depending on where your tire fails. So I also carry a 6-ton bottle jack just in case.
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Old 09-30-2022, 07:14 AM   #8
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12 ton bottle jack on the road, floor jack here at the shop.

Depending on the job, lift on either the equalizer of U-bolts.

No matter what I'm doing I always use at least one jack stand.
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Old 09-30-2022, 08:34 AM   #9
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I used the following strategy when repacking the bearings on my fifth wheel this past summer. My goal in this was to keep the frame from twisting, have the trailer stable while working on it, and to prevent any tires from being overloaded.

First I dropped the nose down, and placed jack stands under the frame behind each rear wheel. Be sure to have the jack stand centered properly under frame. I had to use a small piece of wood in between the frame and jack stand to distribute the weight properly (I didnít want all the weight on the flanges of the frame).

Next I raised up the front. In my case I used the front landing gear on my 5er. You might want to use a bottle jack if you are concerned about overloading the tongue jack. At this point I would put wood blocking under each side of the frame and lower the trailer onto it.

Note: in doing this, I wasnít trying to get my tires off the ground. Remember my goal was to keep things stable, take the worst of the weight off the tires, and not twist the frame.

From here I worked on each tire one at a time. I put a bottle jack under the U bolt to lift the tire. It didnít take much lifting.

***For blocking I cut up a 4 x 6. My frame sits 24 inches above the ground, so I used 6 ton jack stands behind the rear wheels.

For the OP: for placing the jack stands, Iíd suggest either notching the Coroplast so you can see the frame, or create a flap by making 2 slits. With a flap you could fold it back down, and tape it up afterwards.
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Old 09-30-2022, 01:56 PM   #10
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Lots of good advice posted above.

Please note most travel trailer axle manufacturers say "absolutely" don't lift on the axle tube. They are made thin to be light. They are often bent to achieve alignment.

If you do not want to miss-align your wheels, avoid lifting on the axle tube.

Truck axle tubes are usually built much thicker.
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Old 10-02-2022, 09:12 AM   #11
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Donít need to over think this issue. I ďfour postĒmy trailer by leaving the front ďAĒ frame electric jack in place, place floor jack under any leaf spring pad first and jack until that tire has good clearance. Place jack stand under frame as close as possible to tire and remove that tire and release floor jack. Repeat on opposite side.
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