Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > TRAVEL TRAILER, 5th WHEEL & TRUCK CAMPER FORUMS > Travel Trailer Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-05-2020, 07:01 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 3
Tow Capacity of 2013 Tundra?

Hello Good Folks,

Been reading here for a couple months, trying to make an educated, first-time travel trailer purchase. Thanks for all the excellent info and tips.

One of my final sticking points has been towing capacity. I have a 2013 Toyota Tundra with a GVWR of 7100 lb and GCWR of 16000 lb. I used the Changin Gears Travel Trailer Weight Calculator, and, assuming I got all the inputs correct, I got the following results/recommendations:

Maximum Trailer Weight- 6,667 lb
Maximum Trailer Weight with Margin- 5,333 lb
Maximum Tongue Weight- 1,000 lb
Maximum Tongue Weight with Margin- 800 lb

My question is this: What Maximum Trailer Weight (trailer weight plus loaded trailer weight) would you pull? Do you go with the "with Margin" recs on your rig? These recs seem a little conservative, but if that's the way to go, then I will.

We were eyeing a 2015 Snow River Rugged Lite, which had a dry weight of 5950 lb... dealer said we had no problem towing that, but now we're not considering it because of these weight recommendations.

What do you all think? Thanks in advance!
marty395 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-05-2020, 07:28 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
tuffr2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Palm Coast Florida
Posts: 9,910
I would pull a 6,000lb trailer with a 2013 Toyota Tundra. That is a 5,000lb empty trailer loaded to 6,000lbs..

With the 2019 redesigned and newer GM 1500 series trucks I would try 7,000lbs as those trucks are bigger.

As you max out your truck the more trouble your truck will have trying to control the trailer.

If you travel local to the state parks and using back roads with a max speed limit of 55mph you can tow more weight. If traveling far on the freeway at 70mph with semi-trucks then that is a lot different than towing at 55mph.

As speed increases the more difficult it it to control the trailer. Wind and air disturbances from Semi-Trucks affect the trailer. When this happens you need to make more steering corrections which adds to driver fatigue.
tuffr2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 08:53 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Beaver Dam, Wisconsin
Posts: 2,107
I agree with tuffr2. I would add that safety is also a major part of the calculations. The faster you go and the more weight you tow, the higher the risk.

I don't know exactly what the calculator you used is doing. There are many calculation shortcuts that could be used.

Of course you started with the Tundra driver's door stickers. That shows what the tow vehicle could pull safely as it left the factory. It only allows a 150# driver. No passengers, luggage, or after market equipment.

You may or may not have included all the additions to TV weight you add when towing. Every thing you or someone else added subtracts from the TV cargo capacity. So, Passengers, luggage, camping equipment, trailer hitch, weight distribution hitch, what ever...

Once you subtract everything added after market, you have the cargo capacity remaining to carry the TT tongue weight. Tongue weight must be 10% of the TT weight for safe towing. Typically it varies between 10 and 15%.
That may be what the calculator is allowing for when it says "with margin".

You can see from the math, that for every 100 # you put into the TV, you take away at least 1000 # of TT weight you can tow.

Factory fresh tow capacity
16000-7100=8900#
tongue weight
8900 x 0.10 = 890# (10%)
8900 x 0.20 = 1780# (20%)

Cargo capacity
7100 - dry weight from sticker = CC
Subtract everything added after market:
Driver 200# -150# = 50#
2 passengers 300#
luggage 150#
dog 40#
added after market hitch and receiver 80#
WDH 60#
what ever -

That leaves remaining cargo capacity you can use for tongue weight.

Published tongue weights of TT's are almost always exactly 10% of the typical TT dry weight for that model. Both of the TT's I bought new had tongue weights of double the published weight.

If you are willing to do the math yourself, you can see how it all works.

Stability while towing based on your results is an experience guess for me. For my TT's, I found I tend to drive faster than I should. Sudden events that threaten safety don't happen often, but possible repercussions are sever.

So for a fully loaded to maximum capacity rig, I set a 55 mph speed limit for myself. At 80% of capacity I allow 65 mph. Beyond that, the fuel consumption is out of control so I rarely drive faster than 70 mph.

I wish you good luck and happy trails ahead!
__________________
Paul Bristol
Kodiak Cub 176RD
Nissan Pathfinder 2015
Persistent is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 08:55 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 50
Not sure how your weight calculator works, but pay attention to the payload sticker that should be found near drivers door column. Anything you put in your truck subtracts from that number except fuel. Passengers, coolers, floor mats, etc plus trailer tongue wgt. I think Toyota also specifies a max tongue weight the truck can handle either a label under your hitch frame or in the manual. Plan that the loaded trailer will put at least 15% of its weight on the hitch.
Always assume the person selling the trailer is " very optimistic" when it comes to what your truck can handle. Best to know yourself and not be persuaded elsewise.
BTW... you'll need to use a weight distribution hitch towing. Whatever it weighs gets added to tongue weight.
Good job investigating b4 you buy. Many fail to do that and it can be costly
lamokadave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 09:14 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Superslif's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Pond Piggies Club
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: NE. Ohio USA
Posts: 5,884
Quote:
Originally Posted by marty395 View Post

One of my final sticking points has been towing capacity. I have a 2013 Toyota Tundra with a GVWR of 7100 lb and GCWR of 16000 lb. I used the Changin Gears Travel Trailer Weight Calculator, and, assuming I got all the inputs correct, I got the following results/recommendations:

Maximum Trailer Weight- 6,667 lb
Maximum Trailer Weight with Margin- 5,333 lb
Maximum Tongue Weight- 1,000 lb
Maximum Tongue Weight with Margin- 800 lb

My question is this: What Maximum Trailer Weight (trailer weight plus loaded trailer weight) would you pull? Do you go with the "with Margin" recs on your rig? These recs seem a little conservative, but if that's the way to go, then I will.

We were eyeing a 2015 Snow River Rugged Lite, which had a dry weight of 5950 lb... dealer said we had no problem towing that, but now we're not considering it because of these weight recommendations.

What do you all think? Thanks in advance!

What 2013 Tundra do you have? double cab ? The 5.7 or the 4.6 V-8?

It almost sounds like you have the smaller 4.6 engine. As a loaner once, I towed with the 4.6 L and 4,500 lb (loaded) RV trailer, and felt like it was sluggish towing it.

I'm pulling a 6400 dry / 7500-7800 lb. wet trailer with a 2014 Tundra DC and the 5.7. Plenty of power, even on steep grades. Mine has a 9900 lb. max towing rating. Would I go tow a larger / longer trailer. NO, I think towing any RV trailer over 30/32' one needs a 3/4 ton truck. That is why I limited myself to the 28.5" trailer we have now.


The 2015 Snow River Rugged Lite is the Northwood product? We have it's sister company ORV Timber Ridge 24rks. Looking at your stated weight, its looking like the 246rks, almost the same layout as ours. Specs for the Snow River product line
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_7948.jpg
Views:	59
Size:	451.6 KB
ID:	288451  
__________________
Jim & Robert ~ NE. OH.
2018 Outdoors RV Timber Ridge 24 RKS
2014 Toyota Tundra Limited 5.7L
IRV2 Photo Album ~Let's Go Places~
Superslif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2020, 10:27 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 3
Great info and feedback, thanks so much, folks.

Superslif: It is the 2013 Double Cab with 5.7L. Snow River is the Northwood one, yep. That is interesting that you're pulling that rig so well. How does it do on freeways, windy conditions, etc? Towing that Snow River would probably be closer to 7000lb wet for me, well above the recommended weight, especially once you add in all the payload additions I have (me at 200lb, wife and small kid, luggage, camper shell, etc).

#1 concern for me is safety, #2 is efficiency and ability to take on long, semi-cross country trips, and not be white-knuckling it for hours on end on the freeway. Trying to get the highest quality, used TT we can that is 24' max length, and ideally not much shorter than that because still want a queen bed that you can walk on both sides of. Also good insulation and construction are key because mother-in-law will be staying in it for a few months when our baby arrives next month. Unfortunately, this all means a heavier trailer (Arctic Fox, Outdoor RV, Nash, Snow River, etc) that it seems is not advisable to tow with my current truck, and I don't want to upgrade that. Only exception seems Lance, which run lighter than the aforementioned, but comparable quality, insulation, etc.
marty395 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2020, 11:20 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Lakeland, Fl
Posts: 26
2013 Tundra tow

Hi Marty, My wife and I have the 2012 Toyota Tundra SR5 TRD 4x4 and we tow an 2015 Dutchman 28' Aerolte 288RLSS. we've made two trips out west (Fl to Wa) and to the Northeast. We found that at 55mph on the interstate we average approx. 12 - 14mpg we utilize Reese weight distribution.
Best wishes on your travels
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Pit Stop Flaming Gorge Utah 2.jpg
Views:	21
Size:	303.2 KB
ID:	288627  
__________________
2015 Dutchman Aerolite 288RLSS
2012 Toyota Tundra SR5 TRD 4x4 5.8l Flexfuel
Norm-n-Mary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2020, 11:39 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Persistent View Post
Published tongue weights of TT's are almost always exactly 10% of the typical TT dry weight for that model. Both of the TT's I bought new had tongue weights of double the published weight.
Why were they double and how could you tell? Take it to a scale?


At the end of the day, what I'm gathering is that tongue weight is the key variable? Is it even worth looking at the tow capacity number of 8900 lb for my truck?

If only considering tongue weight: My TV, fully loaded at 6100 lb, with a 7100 lb GVWR, has 1000 lb to spare for tongue weight. How close to that 1000 lb would you push it to be safe? That calculator I used suggests a 20% safety margin, so 800 lb then...

Thanks in advance, again.
marty395 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2020, 01:10 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
tuffr2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Palm Coast Florida
Posts: 9,910
You have to remember towing ability includes other types of trailers. Like a boat on a trailer tows easier than a travel trailer. Or a 6.5' wide cargo trailer or a flat bed trailer where you can stack bricks over the axles of the trailer so you do not have much weight on the truck.

A horse trailer is also easier to tow.

Of all the trailers the travel trailer is by far the most difficult to tow. The big front that fights air resistance to the big high flat sides that catch any wind or semi truck air disturbance makes it difficult to tow. Even the big flat back causes a vacuum that is trying to pull the trailer backward.
tuffr2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2020, 02:34 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by marty395 View Post
Why were they double and how could you tell? Take it to a scale?


At the end of the day, what I'm gathering is that tongue weight is the key variable? Is it even worth looking at the tow capacity number of 8900 lb for my truck?

If only considering tongue weight: My TV, fully loaded at 6100 lb, with a 7100 lb GVWR, has 1000 lb to spare for tongue weight. How close to that 1000 lb would you push it to be safe? That calculator I used suggests a 20% safety margin, so 800 lb then...

Thanks in advance, again.
I'll agree that a ready to camp TT can double the published tongue wgt. Our first trailer was a single axle GeoPro. GVW 3800#. I think tongue wgt was advertised around 300#. By the time I added a 2nd propane tank, 2x6v batteries, solar, all the common extras and just reasonable stuff in front storage, the TT kissed 800# on the tongue.
I'd also agree with your thought to focus on the tongue, wgt as that pushes you toward the easiest TV spec to exceed (Payload).
You might want to focus on double axle trailers as they tend to have lower tongue wgts.
Our current TT is a 28ft Lance. Again advertised tongue under 600# but ready to camp near 1000#. At least with the Lance, my tongue wgt is actually a bit under 15% of the trailers GVW of 7k.
Lance is a lighter true 4 season brand of better than average quality. By model, some run tongue heavy, some a bit light. If you use the Lance owners forum, you can get information by model from owners. Good way to find out what to expect
lamokadave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2020, 06:46 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Beaver Dam, Wisconsin
Posts: 2,107
Quote:
Originally Posted by marty395 View Post
Why were they double and how could you tell? Take it to a scale?

At the end of the day, what I'm gathering is that tongue weight is the key variable? Is it even worth looking at the tow capacity number of 8900 lb for my truck?

If only considering tongue weight: My TV, fully loaded at 6100 lb, with a 7100 lb GVWR, has 1000 lb to spare for tongue weight. How close to that 1000 lb would you push it to be safe? That calculator I used suggests a 20% safety margin, so 800 lb then...

Thanks in advance, again.
Weigh the tongue using a tongue weight gauge. Mine cost about $130 on Amazon.

You can and should get actual weights at a commercial scale. Weigh fully loaded rig. You will get axle and total weight in the report for about $15. Weigh the loaded truck without TT (another $15). Weight of truck with TT minus Weight of truck without is tongue weight.

A dealer or private seller is not likely going to let you tow the TT to a scale before you buy. However, you can probably strong arm the dealer to let you use your own tongue weight gauge on the lot.

Many dealers are not happy revealing actual tongue weight. They would rather you bought a bigger TT and only later found out you need a bigger tow vehicle. The last dealer I bought from refused a direct request for actual tongue weight and a prospective dealer for a new one also curtly refused.

A tongue weight gauge cost about $130. Most dealers probably have one but refuse to reveal results.

For every 100 pounds you add to the tow vehicle, you must subtract at least 1000 pounds from the towing capacity. The 80% rule of thumb is for people who refuse to do the math.

The towing capacity number for your truck is probably based on a 10% tongue weight and the cargo capacity of the truck. The towing capacity is an extremely optimistic number you are not likely to achieve in actual use. However, it is the maximum. Going over is bad luck. It is just that in actual use, the maximum will be less.

1000# Remaining Cargo Capacity

1000 / .10 = 10,000 # actual weight towing capacity @ 10%
1000 / .15 = 6,700 # actual weight towing capacity @15%
So 6,700 would be my maximum.


My Nissan Pathfinder SUV has 1300# CC to start with. I tow a Kodiak Cub with actual weight of 4300#. It is an acceptable combination. I have made a few emergency recoveries and it works well. I would not want to tow anything heavier with my rig.

I wish you good luck and happy trails ahead!
__________________
Paul Bristol
Kodiak Cub 176RD
Nissan Pathfinder 2015
Persistent is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2020, 01:21 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Superslif's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Pond Piggies Club
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: NE. Ohio USA
Posts: 5,884
Quote:
Originally Posted by marty395 View Post
Great info and feedback, thanks so much, folks.

Superslif: It is the 2013 Double Cab with 5.7L. Snow River is the Northwood one, yep. That is interesting that you're pulling that rig so well. How does it do on freeways, windy conditions, etc? Towing that Snow River would probably be closer to 7000lb wet for me, well above the recommended weight, especially once you add in all the payload additions I have (me at 200lb, wife and small kid, luggage, camper shell, etc).

#1 concern for me is safety, #2 is efficiency and ability to take on long, semi-cross country trips, and not be white-knuckling it for hours on end on the freeway. Trying to get the highest quality, used TT we can that is 24' max length, and ideally not much shorter than that because still want a queen bed that you can walk on both sides of. Also good insulation and construction are key because mother-in-law will be staying in it for a few months when our baby arrives next month. Unfortunately, this all means a heavier trailer (Arctic Fox, Outdoor RV, Nash, Snow River, etc) that it seems is not advisable to tow with my current truck, and I don't want to upgrade that. Only exception seems Lance, which run lighter than the aforementioned, but comparable quality, insulation, etc.
The 2014 Tundra is rated for 9900 lb. Wet like I said Iím in the 7500-7800. It has plenty of horsepower, even the hills VT, NH and Maine we did in 2018. Last years 6 week trip was State Parks and US Forest Service Campgrounds in WV, VA, NC and SC. Again going up and over mountain passes you know the 5.7 was working ( earning her keep ) but not screaming.

One test in New Brunswick Canada coming out of the Bay of Fundy National Park. Soon as you turn out of the campground there is a 2000í vertical climb over about 3 miles. She sailed right on up, 3/4 throttle at 45mph.

But would I like ďmoreĒ truck, of course. If I didnít own the Tundra I would be looking at a 3/4 ton. I have test drive a Ford 250 (6.2 gas). There is a person in the campground Iím at now who has a ORV 24 rls (same weight as my 24RKS) and a Ram 6.4 Hemi (2500). I want to touch bases to see what he gets towing mileage wise. I know the F250 will get 7-8. I get 9.5 now if I keep it in the sweet spot of 6/mph ( no wind ). Coming out to the campground Iím at not with a little tailwind I got 10.2 mpg. My Tundra only has the smaller 26 gallon fuel tank.

Yes and especially side wind over 25 mph you will feel it. When we brought the RV back from our purchase in OR to OH., we had massive windy conditions in WY and NE. 30,35 40+ ( side winds ). Twice we pulled off the highway and waited till the wind to calmed down. Even the RV hauler guys said they park it at anything over 25 mph winds.

The Tundra, Iím assuming yours is the same only has a 980 lb Hitch capacity. I added the Firestone air bags to the rear suspension. Iím perfectly level now.

You will find the Lance trailers to be $10-20k more than a ORV units if purchased new. I find them very short on storage space.
__________________
Jim & Robert ~ NE. OH.
2018 Outdoors RV Timber Ridge 24 RKS
2014 Toyota Tundra Limited 5.7L
IRV2 Photo Album ~Let's Go Places~
Superslif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2020, 05:30 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
ttavasc's Avatar


 
Ford Super Duty Owner
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Jayco Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Auburn, WA
Posts: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superslif View Post
The 2014 Tundra is rated for 9900 lb. Wet like I said Iím in the 7500-7800. It has plenty of horsepower, even the hills VT, NH and Maine we did in 2018. Last years 6 week trip was State Parks and US Forest Service Campgrounds in WV, VA, NC and SC. Again going up and over mountain passes you know the 5.7 was working ( earning her keep ) but not screaming.

One test in New Brunswick Canada coming out of the Bay of Fundy National Park. Soon as you turn out of the campground there is a 2000í vertical climb over about 3 miles. She sailed right on up, 3/4 throttle at 45mph.

But would I like ďmoreĒ truck, of course. If I didnít own the Tundra I would be looking at a 3/4 ton. I have test drive a Ford 250 (6.2 gas). There is a person in the campground Iím at now who has a ORV 24 rls (same weight as my 24RKS) and a Ram 6.4 Hemi (2500). I want to touch bases to see what he gets towing mileage wise. I know the F250 will get 7-8. I get 9.5 now if I keep it in the sweet spot of 6/mph ( no wind ). Coming out to the campground Iím at not with a little tailwind I got 10.2 mpg. My Tundra only has the smaller 26 gallon fuel tank.

Yes and especially side wind over 25 mph you will feel it. When we brought the RV back from our purchase in OR to OH., we had massive windy conditions in WY and NE. 30,35 40+ ( side winds ). Twice we pulled off the highway and waited till the wind to calmed down. Even the RV hauler guys said they park it at anything over 25 mph winds.

The Tundra, Iím assuming yours is the same only has a 980 lb Hitch capacity. I added the Firestone air bags to the rear suspension. Iím perfectly level now.

You will find the Lance trailers to be $10-20k more than a ORV units if purchased new. I find them very short on storage space.
The F-250 6.2L will do a bit better than 7-8 over the distance. We've got close to 6K now on our '19 F-250 and ORV 23DBS (close to 8K wet) and overall average towing is sitting at 9.3. This is combination of mountain passes in Washington and eastern Oregon as well as some flatter stretches in Utah/Arizona/New Mexico.

With the 6-speed tranny and the 4.30 gears we tend to keep it under 65 - usually around 62. Plenty of power though when needed and pulls the passes at speed running around 3800 rpm. So far worst tank is 8.2 with headwinds in south-central Idaho and best tank was 12 heading north out of Kanab, UT with a good tailwind.
__________________
TT: 2019 ORV Timber Ridge 23DBS, Blue Ox SwayPro 15K/1500
TV: 2019 Ford F-250 XLT SuperCab LB, 6.2L, 4.30/e-locker, 4x4, 164" WB, 3216 payload
TV: 2014 RAM 1500 Big Horn CC (Traded in)
TT: 2015 Jay Flight SLX 195RB Baja Edition, Andersen No-Sway (Traded in)
ttavasc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2020, 05:32 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 314
Tounge weight has 100% to do with how you load it. Sometimes, its by bad design by the manufacture, the storage on my Coleman is at the front, so utilizing it for anything heavy can throw off the balance greatly. There is storage inside at the rear under the bench seats and jacknife sofa, but do I really want to drag heavy stuff back there? Some unbalance can be mitigated by adding the spare tire and carrier to the rear, but without checking the tounge weight every time you load up, it can easily get out of whack!
hillbilly3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tow



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Tow vehicle - 2017 Tundra mthopton Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 6 06-10-2017 07:30 AM
2007 Tundra SR5 V8 4 wheel drive towing capacity brysonte Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 6 09-02-2015 02:03 PM
No tow-Haul switch on 2008 tundra crewmax scottfarm Travel Trailer Discussion 7 02-15-2014 11:29 PM
2008 tundra crewmax LTD 4.7 no tow switch scottfarm Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 2 12-22-2013 05:01 PM
Can you tow a Toyota Tundra? opoteat Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 7 09-14-2009 09:26 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.