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Old 11-17-2020, 02:37 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by plantmontana View Post
Looking at a 2006 Arctic Fox 19B. It got skipped on the thermal double pane windows. Thinking of installing a wood stove but still am concerned about window condensation and resulting damage possibilities.
Does anyone have input about effectiveness of inserting foam blocks in window area during night to help prevent moisture build-up?
Or any other input regarding single pain!?
Dehumidifier is the solution. We run a 35 pint a day one in our 40 ft motorhome during the winter in the Pacific Northwet. Ran one year around when we lived on our boat on the Puget Sound. They work. They keep the windows from getting wet, keep the fabrics from holding moisture, keep the walls dry and your roof vents from dripping on you.

We have a Keystone as that is the quietest one we could find. Even with double pane windows our new to us rig has, the windshield still gets wet inside if the dehumidifier is off this time of year. And the roof vents would drip at night. When we cook or shower, we run the fan on our roof vent to help take out the wet air.
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Old 12-19-2020, 09:53 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by plantmontana View Post
Looking at a 2006 Arctic Fox 19B. It got skipped on the thermal double pane windows. Thinking of installing a wood stove but still am concerned about window condensation and resulting damage possibilities.
Does anyone have input about effectiveness of inserting foam blocks in window area during night to help prevent moisture build-up?
Or any other input regarding single pain!?
Seems these are two different issues. Reflectix will help with insulation but is unrelated to the moisture issue. Yes, you might not see it accumulate on the windows, but it will accumulate somewhere else instead. I lived in an old house in Minneapolis with single pane windows and those next to worthless storm windows on the outside. It was a morning routine to grab a towl and wipe all the windows. At least we had clean windows

Might not be what you want to do, but those diesel heaters exhaust outside, so the moisture from the fuel isn't added to the inside air.
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Old 12-21-2020, 10:01 AM   #17
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Might not be what you want to do, but those diesel heaters exhaust outside, so the moisture from the fuel isn't added to the inside air.
So does the factory propane furnace.....and a wood stove too as far as that goes.

Ditto on the humidifier comments.

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Old 12-21-2020, 11:03 PM   #18
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So does the factory propane furnace.....and a wood stove too as far as that goes.

Ditto on the humidifier comments.

Dave
I thought it was based on where the combustion took place but I am out of my ballpark on this.
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Old 12-21-2020, 11:18 PM   #19
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I thought it was based on where the combustion took place but I am out of my ballpark on this.

It is based on where the combustion takes place but a furnace/heater that exhausts to the outside, regardless of what type, will not exhaust moisture into the air in the coach. Where folks get into moisture issues is when they have "Buddy" type heaters that exhaust the moisture from combustion into the heated envelope (the inside of your RV).

The advantage of an RV furnace, diesel or propane, is that they also get their combustion air from outside unlike a wood stove that gets it's combustion air from inside the coach unless you have an external air draw which I'm pretty sure is fairly uncommon. The wood stove will also draw cold air in from the outside through every nook and cranny of the RV.
The long and the short of it is that a diesel/propane furnace is probably your best bet as it doesn't release moisture into the envelope and creates high pressure inside the envelope which will help reduce cold air intrusion.
That said, it's difficult to get the humidity level down without some sort of dehumidifying system due to the small volume and the moisture in your respiration. A small 12V computer type fan blowing at the windows may be your best bet as they will draw a whole lot less power than a dehumidifier with is essentially a small refrigerator. Good luck.
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Old 12-22-2020, 10:20 AM   #20
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It is based on where the combustion takes place but a furnace/heater that exhausts to the outside, regardless of what type, will not exhaust moisture into the air in the coach. Where folks get into moisture issues is when they have "Buddy" type heaters that exhaust the moisture from combustion into the heated envelope (the inside of your RV).

The advantage of an RV furnace, diesel or propane, is that they also get their combustion air from outside unlike a wood stove that gets it's combustion air from inside the coach unless you have an external air draw which I'm pretty sure is fairly uncommon. The wood stove will also draw cold air in from the outside through every nook and cranny of the RV.
The long and the short of it is that a diesel/propane furnace is probably your best bet as it doesn't release moisture into the envelope and creates high pressure inside the envelope which will help reduce cold air intrusion.
That said, it's difficult to get the humidity level down without some sort of dehumidifying system due to the small volume and the moisture in your respiration. A small 12V computer type fan blowing at the windows may be your best bet as they will draw a whole lot less power than a dehumidifier with is essentially a small refrigerator. Good luck.
yep..... and though a wood stove does indeed draw combustion air from the living space, this actually reduces condensation by forcing you to open a window for additional ventilation.....the only downside is wasted fuel....which is typically free.

there are only three real ways to reduce condensation;

- don't make any excess moisture; you can eliminate showers and boiling water perhaps but breathing is a bit of a necessity soooo...

- use a dehumidifier; obviously 120v power required

- ventilate....yes it will cost fuel and power.


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Old 12-25-2020, 02:38 PM   #21
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yep..... and though a wood stove does indeed draw combustion air from the living space, this actually reduces condensation by forcing you to open a window for additional ventilation.....the only downside is wasted fuel....which is typically free.

there are only three real ways to reduce condensation;

- don't make any excess moisture; you can eliminate showers and boiling water perhaps but breathing is a bit of a necessity soooo...

- use a dehumidifier; obviously 120v power required

- ventilate....yes it will cost fuel and power.


Dave
If you are going to use some current to run a dehumidifier couldn't the same energy be used for an electric heater, even just a small one as electric heaters dry the air.
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Old 12-25-2020, 07:57 PM   #22
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If you are going to use some current to run a dehumidifier couldn't the same energy be used for an electric heater, even just a small one as electric heaters dry the air.

Electric heaters do not dry the air......
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Old 12-26-2020, 10:54 AM   #23
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it really makes no difference how you heat the inside of your R/V. its a humidity problem and heating the inside isn't going to do anything but probably make it worse. you have moisture laden air the ONLY way to get the moisture out is to dehumidify. heating it just makes warm moisture laden air that condense on anything cold.
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Old 12-26-2020, 03:34 PM   #24
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Electric heaters do not dry the air......
Every article I read confirms they do...just saying....

https://hvac.ninja/articles/space-heaters-humidity

"Space heaters can be great solutions, but even energy efficient space heaters have a noticeable effect on humidity. When space heaters warm air, the capacity of that air to hold moisture increases. However, since no new moisture is added, the relative humidity, the amount of water in the air compared to how much that air can hold, decreases. That makes the air feel even drier, especially when using forced air heaters.

You might notice that you feel stuffy all the time, your skin can become dry, and your hair might become frizzy. This decrease in relative humidity can also have detrimental effects on your pets, furniture, and even musical instruments."

Is there less moisture, you might be right, but it does lower the relative humidity which means the air can hold more moisture which means it is less likely to condensate on the windows.

So, is there less moisture, the point is moot if the relativity is lower which is the point of my comment.
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Old 12-26-2020, 03:56 PM   #25
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it really makes no difference how you heat the inside of your R/V. its a humidity problem and heating the inside isn't going to do anything but probably make it worse. you have moisture laden air the ONLY way to get the moisture out is to dehumidify. heating it just makes warm moisture laden air that condense on anything cold.
Jay D.
BTW, I lived in Panama for 2.5 years. Guess what everyone had in their closets? A small lightbulb at the bottom. Visited South America, Ecuador, places near the equator all had light bulbs in their closets, under the sink, in cupboards, etc. They weren't there for the light, they were there to remove humidity or more correctly, to heat the space to change the relativity.

An RV contains lots of spaces that don't get air flow which means they would be cooler which means a light bulb would help.

Someone who is better at math than me could compare the two options. Use electricity on a dehumidifier to remove the moisture or use the electricity to dry heat the air and being warmer is a side benefit.
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Old 12-26-2020, 09:24 PM   #26
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Every article I read confirms they do...just saying....

https://hvac.ninja/articles/space-heaters-humidity

"Space heaters can be great solutions, but even energy efficient space heaters have a noticeable effect on humidity. When space heaters warm air, the capacity of that air to hold moisture increases. However, since no new moisture is added, the relative humidity, the amount of water in the air compared to how much that air can hold, decreases. That makes the air feel even drier, especially when using forced air heaters.

You might notice that you feel stuffy all the time, your skin can become dry, and your hair might become frizzy. This decrease in relative humidity can also have detrimental effects on your pets, furniture, and even musical instruments."

Is there less moisture, you might be right, but it does lower the relative humidity which means the air can hold more moisture which means it is less likely to condensate on the windows.

So, is there less moisture, the point is moot if the relativity is lower which is the point of my comment.
Right. It makes it feel as if it's lower. It does NOT lower humidity. The amount of water in the air remains the same. Just as likely to condensate on cold surfaces. Hot air,(with ANY moisture content) cold surface = condensation. period.
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Old 12-26-2020, 10:58 PM   #27
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Yep, if you have power, use a humidifier, not an electric heater. ;-)
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Old 12-27-2020, 11:17 AM   #28
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You also need to open cupboard and wardrobe doors to get the dry air to them. We have a 70 pint dehumidifier sitting in the bathroom with the drain hose in the shower so it can run 24/7. Pretty wet here in the Seattle area in the winter, don't have to run it as much in the summer but a must in winter. The humidity here is over 80% always so opening a window or vent just brings more moisture in.
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