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Old 03-12-2008, 11:42 AM   #1
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I've had a conventional log burning Campfire-In-A-Can for a couple years now. Those iRV2 members who were at the 2007 National Rally might remember sitting around a wood burning campfire-in-a-can every evening as we gathered to chat. Many folks commented how neat and convenient it was being able to sit around a self contained fire without having a permanent fire ring. The campground also appreciated it since we weren't burning holes in their nice lawn. That Campfire in a can, was the wood burning version that we actually burned a man-made log in. A typical 3 lb log burned for several hours in that unit.

The manufacturers of the conventional Campfire redesigned that unit with many improvements while at the same time released the next generation of propane burning campfire called the Gas Can Campfire in a Can.

At first, everyone may wonder what's the purpose of a propane campfire? Well, while it's true that you don't have the crackling noise, and glowing embers of the conventional fire, you also don't have the dirt, sparks, and mess associated with hauling wood for a wood fire. In addition, more and more campgrounds and state parks are banning the use of wood for fires due to risk of insect migration in firewood, and the risk of blowing sparks causing forest fires when burning wood.

In Pennsylvania, I currently live in a quarantined county because of the emerald ash borer beetle which means I'm not supposed to move wood outside the quarrantined area. There also are some parks we camped at that don't provide firerings so the thought of a propane fire seemed an ideal solution for me in those locations.

As it turns out, propane campfires provide a nice safe realistic looking fire which provides a significant amount of heat. The risk of wildfire is eliminated since there is no flying ash or sparks that can be blown by the wind and start a fire. They are clean burning, and are technically listed as cooking appliances by the forestry department so they are permitted even in areas of fire bans. In adverse weather conditions, it can even be placed close to a camper to allow sitting underneath the awning without fear of wood sparks burning a hole in the awning.

Of course, having a campfire is for the ambience as well as the heat generated by the fire. Although a propane fire won't ever achieve the complete ambience of a crackling campfire, the propane Campfire-in-a-can offers a high BTU output heat source with decent looking flames. Most other propane campfires I looked at ranged from 15-22,000 BTU which is a pretty low output. The Camp-fire-in-a-can propane version through is adjustable up to its rated at 64,000 BTU. This unit really puts out heat that you can feel, or it can be turned down do a smaller flame if desired. The heat output is what really sets this device apart from the lower cost copycat versions.

I was so anxious to try the unit when I received it that I actually set it up on my back porch. The unit is very easy to store and set up due to its unique storage can. The cover is removed by opening three latches, and then conveniently becomes a base to raise the campfire up off the ground or the fire can be placed right on the ground if desired. The propane hose, with attached regulator and control valve unwraps from the base and attaches to a propane source such as a 5-20 lb cylinder. The hose is plenty long enough to attach to a propane cylinder remotely, or it can be connected right to a high pressure output on your self-contained camper tank. Lighting is as simple as opening the propane tank valve then opening the gas valve while holding an extended match over the burner.

Once the unit lights, the flames dance around and are windblown just like a real fire. With a one piece ceramic log set, the fire is designed to look like a real wood fire without the typical multi piece ceramic logs and vermiculite that the other brands require to be put in the fire for each use.

I realize that a propane campfire isn't for everyone and this one does cost more than some of the others available on the market, but after a good bit of research, I feel it was the best quality one for the price. Not only is it the only one CSA approved and can be set right on burnable materials. That's important to me since it could be set on dry grass, or on a picnic table. Additionally with the longer hose and adjustable flame size, the unit allows tailoring the fire for either a few friends to sit around, or a whole bunch.

Although I have to wait for our official camping season to roll around for a chance to use it with a group while camping, I have to give it a big thumbs up based on my initial use.

Below are a few photo's but the flames really don't show up well during daylight when photographing. You can checkout the Campfire in a can pictures online or watch the company's You Tube Video if you'd like.





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Old 03-12-2008, 11:42 AM   #2
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I've had a conventional log burning Campfire-In-A-Can for a couple years now. Those iRV2 members who were at the 2007 National Rally might remember sitting around a wood burning campfire-in-a-can every evening as we gathered to chat. Many folks commented how neat and convenient it was being able to sit around a self contained fire without having a permanent fire ring. The campground also appreciated it since we weren't burning holes in their nice lawn. That Campfire in a can, was the wood burning version that we actually burned a man-made log in. A typical 3 lb log burned for several hours in that unit.

The manufacturers of the conventional Campfire redesigned that unit with many improvements while at the same time released the next generation of propane burning campfire called the Gas Can Campfire in a Can.

At first, everyone may wonder what's the purpose of a propane campfire? Well, while it's true that you don't have the crackling noise, and glowing embers of the conventional fire, you also don't have the dirt, sparks, and mess associated with hauling wood for a wood fire. In addition, more and more campgrounds and state parks are banning the use of wood for fires due to risk of insect migration in firewood, and the risk of blowing sparks causing forest fires when burning wood.

In Pennsylvania, I currently live in a quarantined county because of the emerald ash borer beetle which means I'm not supposed to move wood outside the quarrantined area. There also are some parks we camped at that don't provide firerings so the thought of a propane fire seemed an ideal solution for me in those locations.

As it turns out, propane campfires provide a nice safe realistic looking fire which provides a significant amount of heat. The risk of wildfire is eliminated since there is no flying ash or sparks that can be blown by the wind and start a fire. They are clean burning, and are technically listed as cooking appliances by the forestry department so they are permitted even in areas of fire bans. In adverse weather conditions, it can even be placed close to a camper to allow sitting underneath the awning without fear of wood sparks burning a hole in the awning.

Of course, having a campfire is for the ambience as well as the heat generated by the fire. Although a propane fire won't ever achieve the complete ambience of a crackling campfire, the propane Campfire-in-a-can offers a high BTU output heat source with decent looking flames. Most other propane campfires I looked at ranged from 15-22,000 BTU which is a pretty low output. The Camp-fire-in-a-can propane version through is adjustable up to its rated at 64,000 BTU. This unit really puts out heat that you can feel, or it can be turned down do a smaller flame if desired. The heat output is what really sets this device apart from the lower cost copycat versions.

I was so anxious to try the unit when I received it that I actually set it up on my back porch. The unit is very easy to store and set up due to its unique storage can. The cover is removed by opening three latches, and then conveniently becomes a base to raise the campfire up off the ground or the fire can be placed right on the ground if desired. The propane hose, with attached regulator and control valve unwraps from the base and attaches to a propane source such as a 5-20 lb cylinder. The hose is plenty long enough to attach to a propane cylinder remotely, or it can be connected right to a high pressure output on your self-contained camper tank. Lighting is as simple as opening the propane tank valve then opening the gas valve while holding an extended match over the burner.

Once the unit lights, the flames dance around and are windblown just like a real fire. With a one piece ceramic log set, the fire is designed to look like a real wood fire without the typical multi piece ceramic logs and vermiculite that the other brands require to be put in the fire for each use.

I realize that a propane campfire isn't for everyone and this one does cost more than some of the others available on the market, but after a good bit of research, I feel it was the best quality one for the price. Not only is it the only one CSA approved and can be set right on burnable materials. That's important to me since it could be set on dry grass, or on a picnic table. Additionally with the longer hose and adjustable flame size, the unit allows tailoring the fire for either a few friends to sit around, or a whole bunch.

Although I have to wait for our official camping season to roll around for a chance to use it with a group while camping, I have to give it a big thumbs up based on my initial use.

Below are a few photo's but the flames really don't show up well during daylight when photographing. You can checkout the Campfire in a can pictures online or watch the company's You Tube Video if you'd like.





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Old 03-12-2008, 03:24 PM   #3
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Neat!

I'm finding nearly all CG's I'm trying to book this year are not allowing firewood to be brought in. Since they always charge a ridiculous fee for a handfull of wet/nasty, so-called firewood at the campstores, this product seems to be the way to go.

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Old 03-13-2008, 03:32 AM   #4
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As I own a campground I thought I'd chime in on this one.

First, there is one very good reason to not allow outside wood into a campground and that is the Ash Borer Beatle. If it spreads to your campground the state has the right to come in and clear cut. This would probably put many out of business.

This problem has been contained to Michigan and Ohio. There might be a couple of other states involved by now. It is not only the campground rules but, state law.

Second, I'm in New York which does not have a ban on outside wood. We allow people to bring in their own wood no problem. I find it poor customer relations if I didn't allow wood and I have no idea how I would enforce it. All I ask is that no one sells wood to other customers.

Third, campgrounds that gouge based on this law are thinking short term. I know that many customers will not camp somewhere where they can't have a fire.

Finally, while this looks like a good product, I sure like a real campfire.
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Old 03-13-2008, 04:58 AM   #5
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We got one last year (it is an older version - the latches on the cover look different and the cover is yellow, but the inside looks pretty much the same) and it does a nice job. Purists may not like it and it's not exactly a roaring bonfire for a large group, but it's adequate for a family to gather 'round. It puts out pretty good heat for its size.

Most campgrounds have sites so close together that when there is even a slight breeze, the wind swirls around between the RVs and blows smoke into your face or into your neighbor's bedroom window. The gas Campfire in a Can solves the smoke problem as well as the firewood problem.
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Old 03-14-2008, 01:18 PM   #6
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Do you have to move the logs around or do they stay in place? Do you think that the log will remain in tact or will it break apart while traveling?

We had a different style and the logs were a pita.

Is there anything in the directions that say how much propane it will use at different heat settings?

Thanks
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Old 03-15-2008, 06:00 AM   #7
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by jimandsue60:
Do you have to move the logs around or do they stay in place? Do you think that the log will remain in tact or will it break apart while traveling?

We had a different style and the logs were a pita.

Is there anything in the directions that say how much propane it will use at different heat settings?

Thanks
Jim </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
The logs are ceramic (or some similar material) like faux fireplace logs, except I think the newer Campfire in a Can logs are lighter than the ones we got with ours. They just stay right there in place for transport. One of the things we like best about Campfire in a Can is that the logs and hose all are protected by the cover in one neat, easy to carry package. Some other portable LP campfires use vermiculite, which can blow in the wind during use and can leak out in transport and make a real mess. Our logs have traveled over 10,000 miles there is no sign of any breakage.

The manual doesn't give a figure for propane usage. I don't have a feel for the rate of usage since we run our Campfire in a Can off the big tank in the motorhome.
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Old 03-15-2008, 08:10 AM   #8
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Thanks for the info.

Jim
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Old 03-15-2008, 09:44 AM   #9
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Just to confirm what Paz said, the logs are a light one piece assembly which is really one of the reasons I liked the new campfire. The one piece log assembly on the unit sits down inside the metal base and can't move. If you flipped the whole unit upside down, the log assembly would come out, but other than that, it can't move.

Just as an approximatino of propane useage, this campfire is rated much higher than any other that I was able to find. Since it's rated at a maximum of 64,000 BTU and a gallon of propane is 91,500, if you were running it on the maximum setting, you'd burn about 2/3 of a gallon of propane an hour. Assuming propane was $3.00 a gallon, the campfire would burn $ 2.00 an hour if you were keeping it on Maximum.

Compared to a wood fire, if you're paying for wood at a campground, it would be much cheaper. I know at typical wood prices at campgrounds, 2 bucks of wood won't last an hour.

The convenience factor or lighting it for an hour for some heat then closing it up and putting it away though is really what makes it useful.

Here's the link of the unit from the forum sponser. Propane Campfire in a Can
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Old 03-19-2008, 12:22 PM   #10
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How quickly does it cool down to be able to handle it and close it up?
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Old 03-19-2008, 12:41 PM   #11
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Ken,

Good question....I didn't really check but I burned it for about 20 minutes on the porch while I was getting the camera and taking some pictures. When I was done, I turned it off, took the camera back in the house then came out and packed it up. It couldn't have been off more than 5-10 minutes when I wrapped the hose around it and packed it away. Since it was cold out (see the snow in the pictures) when I was using it, I'm sure it cooled off faster than normal, but I doubt you'd ever have to let it cool longer than 10-15 minutes to put it away and maybe not even that long.

The bottom base where the hose wraps stays cool, but the ceramic logs will get warm. Since they are pretty light though, I don't think they hold the heat. You could probably wrap the hose up within a couple minutes of turning it off and put the cover on even if the logs are still warm.

I'll pay attention to cooling time the next time I burn the unit.
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Old 03-20-2008, 08:05 AM   #12
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We've had another brand, the New Frontier Campfire for about 8 years now and love it. Burns nicely, uses a modest amount of fuel, cools off quickly and absolutely no hassle to use. We still prefer a wood fire when a fire pit and wood are avaialble, but more and more campgrounds do not allow real fires anymore.

I'm considering selling my New Frontier and getting the Can - it's a bit smaller to store away and we never seem to have enough space for all the toys.
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Old 03-28-2008, 03:25 PM   #13
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JavaJelly/Scott:

I am under the impression that NY DOES have a ban on moving firewood into the state:

NYS DEC

Please be careful!
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Old 05-14-2008, 08:49 PM   #14
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Can I assume from this discussion the Camping World version ($50) is only going to put out a fraction of the BTU's of this one?
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