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Old 03-08-2021, 12:14 PM   #29
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Could you post a photo please?

Thanks in advance

Mike
No picture to display, it is simply an inverted T with the parallel ends open. The bait has a hole in the center so it may be put on the 1/4" all-thread, as the bottom bait block is eaten the next one falls to the bottom of the rod.
I usually find around 3-4 dead mice in the garage each winter, none have ever given off an odor, they just dry-up if I miss stumbling across one.
Birds of prey do not eat them I suppose, I have had a family of red-tail hawks living and breeding in my valley for almost 40 years now, never have found one dead.
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Old 03-08-2021, 06:12 PM   #30
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I'll offer the perspective of someone who battled these little critters as an institutional pest control guy for 16 years.

I'll keep my mouse post somewhat short for a change. First, real research has shown there is no effective mouse repellant, period. Oh, wait, there was one odor that seemed to reduce mouse visits to a treated area by about 30%. It was cat urine.

#1 has been mentioned several times above, and it's the hardest part by far. In the pest control industry its called "Exclusion." In lay terms, it's finding and sealing up any entry points. Keep 'em out.

#2 Bait OUTSIDE the rig. Feed 'em before they enter. I recommend block bait over pelleted because mice can carry away the pellets to store them for later. You can go through more pelleted bait because of that. Use a pet/child resistant bait station. Bait reduces local populations which reduces "pest pressure" which is competition for resources.

#3 Monitor. Place sticky boards along base of walls in areas where mice activity has been seen and check regularly. Never, and I repeat NEVER assume you've won the rodent war. Rodents are on duty 24/7/365. Their survival depends on finding food, water and shelter. You can monitor with traps. One negative about using baited traps is you are placing an attractant inside your rig - offering them a food source which is counter intuitive but it can be a little more person friendly. While finding a squished mouse is gross, finding one stuck down on a glue board still alive and struggling can be a little off putting to some people.

Effective Rodent control is a three legged stool. Remove one leg and it's less effective. If you are absolutely against bait, make sure your other two legs are strong. You could even replace the bait leg with exterior traps but if you have a high population you'll have your hands full servicing traps.
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Old 03-08-2021, 07:15 PM   #31
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I'll offer the perspective of someone who battled these little critters as an institutional pest control guy for 16 years.

I'll keep my mouse post somewhat short for a change. First, real research has shown there is no effective mouse repellant, period. Oh, wait, there was one odor that seemed to reduce mouse visits to a treated area by about 30%. It was cat urine.

#1 has been mentioned several times above, and it's the hardest part by far. In the pest control industry its called "Exclusion." In lay terms, it's finding and sealing up any entry points. Keep 'em out.

#2 Bait OUTSIDE the rig. Feed 'em before they enter. I recommend block bait over pelleted because mice can carry away the pellets to store them for later. You can go through more pelleted bait because of that. Use a pet/child resistant bait station. Bait reduces local populations which reduces "pest pressure" which is competition for resources.

#3 Monitor. Place sticky boards along base of walls in areas where mice activity has been seen and check regularly. Never, and I repeat NEVER assume you've won the rodent war. Rodents are on duty 24/7/365. Their survival depends on finding food, water and shelter. You can monitor with traps. One negative about using baited traps is you are placing an attractant inside your rig - offering them a food source which is counter intuitive but it can be a little more person friendly. While finding a squished mouse is gross, finding one stuck down on a glue board still alive and struggling can be a little off putting to some people.

Effective Rodent control is a three legged stool. Remove one leg and it's less effective. If you are absolutely against bait, make sure your other two legs are strong. You could even replace the bait leg with exterior traps but if you have a high population you'll have your hands full servicing traps.
Once you've had mice in your TT you will never forget it. When it first happened to me I thought it was birds on the roof. Then I saw the droppings on the couch. Then it was war!

Sticky pads - I got one with that.

Then water in the tub with the curtiin out. It climbed up the curtin and I heard it splashing around. A stick got that one.

If I'm boon docking. I look for small holes in the ground. Then I drop some Tom Cat around. Only the wheels and jack touch the ground.

Having said that. I've seen a field mouse eat the Tom Cat and over several days eat more. It must not act quickly.
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Old 03-08-2021, 08:16 PM   #32
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I keep mine parked in on a stone driveway. Rocks, not your small gravel. Dont know if that helps, but in a over a yr not a single critter. I have crawled all around underneath looking for holes and could find none, other than the engine compartment. Ive always thought of mice to run along walls, so I am not parked next to the pole barn where I store mine. crossing fingers
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Old 03-08-2021, 08:23 PM   #33
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I read somewhere a long time ago to use Bounce dryer sheets to keep mice away. I did. No mice, not even once. I also have a dog. Not sure which it was, or if both helped. Make of that anecdote what you will.
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Old 03-09-2021, 01:15 PM   #34
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I tried Bounce. The mice tore up the sheets to make a nest in the intake manifold.

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Old 03-09-2021, 05:22 PM   #35
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The researchers we had speak at our classes make a living on trying to develop ways of dealing with rodents. These little furry pests cause hundreds of millions, or even billions of dollars of damage in the food storage, transportation, and preparation industry every year. If drier sheets/soap/scented oil worked, it would be a world wide, industry standard. They showed slides of mice curled up sleeping in a nests made of drier sheets, bars of Irish Spring soap half eaten with tiny teeth marks in it, and mice contently washing themselves sitting right in front of an ultrasonic "pest chaser". Whenever I'm out shopping or going to a restaurant, I joke to my wife each time I see a bait station around the foundation of the building: "Oh, look honey, a container of peppermint oil/Irish Spring/Bounce." You will never see a professional pest control person treating any facility with perfumed soap or drier sheets. Shoot, as a person who had to do battle with these little critters for years at work, I would have been all over the drier sheets or soap idea if it meant I didn't have to crawl under buildings, wriggle into pipe chases, or crawl around in itchy, hot attics to plug holes or place traps. One facility I was responsible for was a food storage warehouse that was right next to a creek. Go a block down the street and that same creek passed a Cargill grain processing facility where train cars full of grain dropped their load through grates in tracks. You can imagine what the rat population was in that area. In the industry that's called extremely high pest pressure! When my employer decided to switch that building from furniture storage to food storage, I spent days crawling all over that warehouse to "exclude" those furry little guys from going after our bags of flour, beans, rice, raisins, etc. I would have LOVED, just walking in and tossing a few boxes of drier sheets around instead.

I like to ask a simple question to someone who thinks a perfumy smells repels rodents. That question is: Where do you often find rodents? Or, a different question might be: When you think Rat, what location comes to mind first? I bet most people would think dump or sewer, neither of which might be called odor free. While its true some rodents can be warry of new smells, sounds, or items, they'll quickly learn if those new things are threats or not. Once they determine they are not, these smells, noises or items blend into the background. This is an actual survival technique. In other posts I've used the real example from where I lived with and worked. A couple times a year the farmers would need to pump out their manure lagoons and they'd spray the liquids onto their fields. People new to the area would gag from the smell, but the locals when asked how they could stand the smell, would reply: "What smell?" We as humans have a tendency to anthropomorphize animal behavior. We apply human logic to a wild animal. We avoid bad smells, sounds, and things that make us uncomfortable, so it makes sense mice would too - except for one difference: Survival. We avoid unpleasant things because we can, but if our survival depended on getting past an unpleasant smell to get to food, water or shelter, guess what we'd do. You only need to look at videos or picture of people who are dirt poor digging through dumps, to pick out anything edible or sellable in order to survive, or drinking water contaminated with human waste. That's what survival is about. That's what rodents face every day of their lives - we however only think about them when our paths cross. They are the professionals, we are the casual amateurs.

The problem with anecdotal evidence is it relies on connecting two events that may have absolutely no relationship to each other. It's simple association which is is how the brain works, and we do it all the time. Its something that's exploited in advertising. I could argue that right before leaving to full time in my RV I purchased a new jacket, and since then, have not been sick once, not even a cold, so it must be the jacket right? Put that association together with the testimony of my mother and grandmother who said "Put on something warm or you'll catch a cold!" and I could argue personal proof that a good jacket prevents colds, and my mother and grandmother would have agreed. We've known for a long time colds are caused by a virus, yet how many mothers say the same thing today?

While home remedies are a part of everyday life, what I worry about is people gravitating toward the easy fix of tossing a few drier sheets or pieces of soap in their rigs assuming it will solve the problem instead if taking the difficult, and proven first step of sealing up the rig and monitoring for activity. It's a bit like spending money on that pill in the grocery store isle that claims to make extra weight just melt away, instead of eating a reasonable diet, watching your portions and getting some exercise. The ads for the pill will often feature testimony from users on how great it worked even if controlled tests prove the pill do nothing.

Ok, I'll get off my Irish Spring soapbox balanced on the back of my my high horse and fade back into the dark until the next mouse thread crops up. Then I'll pop up like a rat who sees a donut behind the chair.
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Old 03-09-2021, 05:24 PM   #36
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The researchers we had speak at our classes make a living on trying to develop ways of dealing with rodents. These little furry pests cause hundreds of millions, or even billions of dollars of damage in the food storage, transportation, and preparation industry every year. If drier sheets/soap/scented oil worked, it would be a world wide, industry standard. They showed slides of mice curled up sleeping in a nests made of drier sheets, bars of Irish Spring soap half eaten with tiny teeth marks in it, and mice contently washing themselves sitting right in front of an ultrasonic "pest chaser". Whenever I'm out shopping or going to a restaurant, I joke to my wife each time I see a bait station around the foundation of the building: "Oh, look honey, a container of peppermint oil/Irish Spring/Bounce." You will never see a professional pest control person treating any facility with perfumed soap or drier sheets. Shoot, as a person who had to do battle with these little critters for years at work, I would have been all over the drier sheets or soap idea if it meant I didn't have to crawl under buildings, wriggle into pipe chases, or crawl around in itchy, hot attics to plug holes or place traps. One facility I was responsible for was a food storage warehouse that was right next to a creek. Go a block down the street and that same creek passed a Cargill grain processing facility where train cars full of grain dropped their load through grates in tracks. You can imagine what the rat population was in that area. In the industry that's called extremely high pest pressure! When my employer decided to switch that building from furniture storage to food storage, I spent days crawling all over that warehouse to "exclude" those furry little guys from going after our bags of flour, beans, rice, raisins, etc. I would have LOVED, just walking in and tossing a few boxes of drier sheets around instead.

I like to ask a simple question to someone who thinks a perfumy smells repels rodents. That question is: Where do you often find rodents? Or, a different question might be: When you think Rat, what location comes to mind first? I bet most people would think dump or sewer, neither of which might be called odor free. While its true some rodents can be warry of new smells, sounds, or items, they'll quickly learn if those new things are threats or not. Once they determine they are not, these smells, noises or items blend into the background. This is an actual survival technique. In other posts I've used the real example from where I lived with and worked. A couple times a year the farmers would need to pump out their manure lagoons and they'd spray the liquids onto their fields. People new to the area would gag from the smell, but the locals when asked how they could stand the smell, would reply: "What smell?" We as humans have a tendency to anthropomorphize animal behavior. We apply human logic to a wild animal. We avoid bad smells, sounds, and things that make us uncomfortable, so it makes sense mice would too - except for one difference: Survival. We avoid unpleasant things because we can, but if our survival depended on getting past an unpleasant smell to get to food, water or shelter, guess what we'd do. You only need to look at videos or picture of people who are dirt poor digging through dumps, to pick out anything edible or sellable in order to survive, or drinking water contaminated with human waste. That's what survival is about. That's what rodents face every day of their lives - we however only think about them when our paths cross. They are the professionals, we are the casual amateurs.

The problem with anecdotal evidence is it relies on connecting two events that may have absolutely no relationship to each other. It's simple association which is is how the brain works, and we do it all the time. Its something that's exploited in advertising. I could argue that right before leaving to full time in my RV I purchased a new jacket, and since then, have not been sick once, not even a cold, so it must be the jacket right? Put that association together with the testimony of my mother and grandmother who said "Put on something warm or you'll catch a cold!" and I could argue personal proof that a good jacket prevents colds, and my mother and grandmother would have agreed. We've known for a long time colds are caused by a virus, yet how many mothers say the same thing today?

While home remedies are a part of everyday life, what I worry about is people gravitating toward the easy fix of tossing a few drier sheets or pieces of soap in their rigs assuming it will solve the problem instead if taking the difficult, and proven first step of sealing up the rig and monitoring for activity. It's a bit like spending money on that pill in the grocery store isle that claims to make extra weight just melt away, instead of eating a reasonable diet, watching your portions and getting some exercise. The ads for the pill will often feature testimony from users on how great it worked even if controlled tests prove the pill do nothing.

Ok, I'll get off my Irish Spring soapbox balanced on the back of my my high horse and fade back into the dark until the next mouse thread crops up. Then I'll pop up like a rat who sees a donut behind the chair.
Sooooo, you've had mice.
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Old 03-09-2021, 05:55 PM   #37
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Sooooo, you've had mice.
You bet I have.

Each pre owned rig I've owned had access points, and it took several tries before I finally got them sealed up. I lived in the country on 5 acres surrounded my fields and I fought them in my home too. The final entry point I found on my current rig was where the hydronic heat hoses passed through an outside wall into the storage compartment. Visually and physically it looked well sealed from the factory, until I decided to do some more probing with my pinkie finger. Found a gap just big enough for a deer mouse head to fit through in the center of the hose bundle. Plugged it up and that's the last time I've come up with any mice in monitoring traps I keep inside the rig and it's been about three years. When I do my regular maintenance and greasing of the rig, I look it over for mouse entry points. That should be on everyone's maintenance list. I learned a long time ago to never assume you've won. I often think the term post control is misleading because it implies you do X, and the problem is solved. I think the term pest management might be more accurate. Compared to mice, rats, ants, spiders, etc, I'm an amateur too. One thing that never ceased to amaze me is just how resourceful little tiny creatures are. There have been many times over the years I've marveled at
a little ant with the brain the size of a grain of sand, that has knocked me back on my heels, made me regroup, and change my tactics. Dealing with these creatures regularly taught me to really respect their tenacity and resourcefulness showed me just how often we underestimate them. I'm hoping by sharing my experience, others will be less likely to make that mistake.
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Old 03-09-2021, 06:42 PM   #38
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Here's another real world example of an improper association with regards to the concept of a pest repellent. I took this picture in a campground in the California wine country. You'll note in the photo the damage caused by woodpeckers to the cabin. The campground owner apparently tried using flash tape type bird repellents to scare away the woodpeckers. Two of these ribbons are marked in the picture as is the very determined woodpecker who continued to work over that and other nearby cabins the whole time I was there.

These same ribbons can be seen in the vineyards near harvest time. I can only assume why the campground owner decided to use the ribbons. Either he figured they must work because the farmers used them, saw them in the store advertised as a bird repellent, or asked the local hardware store person what they'd recommend and was told "this is what the farmer use." This is an example of improperly connecting two date points - farmer uses strips to scare birds therfore stips will deter woodpeckers. Well, the picture shows how effective the ribbons were. The woodpecker flew right past them spinning in the wind time after time. Why? Well, they may have worked for a short time until the woodpecker determined they weren't a threat and the ribbons became just another thing in the background. What's the difference between the campground owner and the farmer? The farmer doesn't hang the ribbons one day and leave them there forever. The ribbons are used for a short time just before harvest when the birds are most likely to be a problem. I'd venture to say the ribbons effectiveness wears off after a certain time but can certainly help at first - just long enough to reduce loss until the grapes are harvested - it's pest management. Even those plastic owls and snakes you see in the stores for scaring away pest bird only work if you regularly move them because like the scarecrow in the field that never moves, animals are smart enough to learn it isn't as threat, and will even sit on the scarecrows head and shoulders. Please remember life has forever been in an arms race. From bacteria to whales, its all about eating, without being eaten, and to do so you must learn what is a danger and what isn't. This process goes on continuously for the life of the creature. It happens with us too. Ever find yourself uncomfortable in new, strange surroundings, or hearing strange noises in the dark? Notice how that discomfort goes away once the unfamiliar becomes familiar? Same goes for that new strange smelling pink chunk of fabric or green lump of soap. It won't be long before it fades into the background and becomes normalized. This falls under a pest control rule: Know your enemy. Also, never underestimate your opponent, even if you could squish it with your shoe.

Why does exclusion work? Because survival is all about energy in vs energy out. Go negative in the equation for too long and you starve and die. Leaving openings in your rig is like leaving your front door open while you aren't home. Pest pressure is the number of thieves in your neighborhood. Even with low pressure if your front door is the only one in the neighborhood that's always wide open while the others are closed and locked, who do you think is most likely to get robbed? If someone told you leaving a light on when you aren't home deters thieves, do you still think it's wise to leave the front door open? All I'm suggesting is you close and lock your front door and not rely on a light to deter burglars. I'm trying to offer some insight to animal behavior as it relates to pest control. Make getting into your rig cost more energy than it's worth so the pest takes the easier route. Use the energy formula to your advantage.

One final piece of information that may help understand another piece of the exclusion bundle. It's not just about providing a physical barrier. Rodent navigate by smell which is why they leave a trail of urine drops along their path. Your rig breathes and no matter how clean you keep it, it still smell like food. The fabric, the carpet and the walls all absorb odors. You may not smell them but that little pointy nose on a mouse sure does, and any opening can waft these odors to the outdoors and just like your neighbor when he's BBQing burgers and hot dogs, these smells can travel a long way. Plugging up all holes helps contain the smell. That's the second reason plugging the holes works. You are no longer leaving your front door open while sending a message into the neighborhood that there's something attractive to steal inside the house.
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Old 03-09-2021, 07:21 PM   #39
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I use these lights under the 5th wheel, my truck and my harley. I had an issue years ago before I found these and never had another problem.

You can get them where they clip on to your batter leads or with battery ones.

I also have blue LED lights around the bottom of my 5th which I now leave on at night.

They work great

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Old 03-09-2021, 09:28 PM   #40
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I use these lights under the 5th wheel, my truck and my harley. I had an issue years ago before I found these and never had another problem.

You can get them where they clip on to your batter leads or with battery ones.

I also have blue LED lights around the bottom of my 5th which I now leave on at night.

They work great

index
I could not find any reference to a warranty on the website.
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Old 03-11-2021, 02:51 PM   #41
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Electrical gadget

I have a gadget that plugs into the 110 on my RV. Supposedly, it sends out a signal or frequency through the entire electrical circuit that repels mice. I used to have a “nice” mice family in my RV. I found their nest and killed 5 babies (smashed their little heads with a hammer) and the mother took off. Since I installed this gadget several years ago, I have had only a few mice that liked my mouse traps and few mouse turds, much less than I used to have.
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Old 03-11-2021, 02:55 PM   #42
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I have tried almost everything someone has suggested and last year I mentioned it to the company that comes quarterly and sprays my home for bugs and he set out a couple of bait stations a few feet from my motorhome and I have not seen a rodent in over a year. They change out the bait stations every quarter when they spray. Hopefully it has not been a fluke. But the year before I started this process, I zapped 7 of them in traps inside the coach.
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