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Old 10-25-2019, 01:54 PM   #1
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14 ply vs 16 ply tires?

I just replaced my OEM Goodyear G670 245/70/R19.5 load range G steer tires at 40,500 miles with Roadmaster RM 170s. The dealer used the load range H version of the RM 170s, which is all he had in stock. I did not even realize that there were G and H versions until after the fact when I researched the load rating vs. pressure table on the Roadmaster web site.

Is there any negatives of using the 16 ply H versions rather than the 14 ply G versions for my RV steer tires, other than the slightly higher cost?

Any positives?

The G version has max cold pressure of 110 PSI and the H version has max cold pressure of 120 PSI. 110 PSI and below, the loading vs. pressure on the 2 versions are identical. For the max front axle weight of my Winnebago Vista , at least 82 PSI is required. I'm always running them between 85-90 PSI cold pressure.
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:17 PM   #2
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The only difference you might notice is a slightly harsher ride due to the increased sidewall thickness.
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Old 10-25-2019, 08:14 PM   #3
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Basically no difference if both G & H are inflated to the same pressure. An H-ply rating allows for a higher max psi, but since you need only inflate to the G range, there is no practical difference. A laboratory could probably measure some difference in sidewall flex, but few humans could detect a difference.
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Old 10-25-2019, 08:19 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Gary RVRoamer View Post
Basically no difference if both G & H are inflated to the same pressure. An H-ply rating allows for a higher max psi, but since you need only inflate to the G range, there is no practical difference. A laboratory could probably measure some difference in sidewall flex, but few humans could detect a difference.
That's what I'm thinking.

If you didn't know there was a difference you wouldn't know there was a difference by feel - too many other variables, especially road conditions.
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Old 10-25-2019, 08:25 PM   #5
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H rated in the front will give you a much harsher ride for sure. Depending on your front axle weight though, and what the manufacturer pressure tables say, you MAY get away with 80-82psi cold pressure or so and that will help some.

The other thing about "H" rated in front is they are so hard, that in bad wet weather you may experience handling issues.

We replaced our Mich Duallys (in the back of course) with Toyo 122 H rated 16 ply tires and are quite happy. That's different.

Steer tires are different than rear tires. They steer, lead into turns, there's only one tire on each side, help tracking down the hwy, etc. Steers are usually a different tread pattern also than what you put on the rear.

As far as max pressure that's on the side wall, either 110 or 120 doesn't mean anything to you IMO. You'll never have that kind of weight in your rig that would warrant that kind of pressure. We have the same kind of MH as you do. We also run about 85-88psi all the way around and we're about 1K under GVWR. And that's with 5psi additional for insurance and possible weight creep.

What you could do is see how they handle and ride. If to harsh and handle bad in wet weather, you could pull those off, put that pair on one of the back duallys, buy another pair for the other duallys and then get a pair of "G" rated for the steers. More money I know. But you'd have the right tires, a much better ride and new tires for the next 5-6yrs.

Good luck my friend.
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Old 10-26-2019, 03:28 AM   #6
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I talked with a tire engineer at Toyo prior to replacing my Super C tires. I run 295/75/22.5 and he strongly recommend H rated as he felt that the poor condition of so many of the highways warranted the stronger tire. I have not noticed any ride difference with the H, but of course my chassis is a Freightliner M2 106 and looks like and rides like a truck. I had a Country Coach pusher previously and do sometimes miss the plush ride but Iíd never go back. So much safer now and service is a breeze.
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Old 10-26-2019, 07:02 AM   #7
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The only difference between a G&H tire is the number of ply's and the load rating.
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Old 10-26-2019, 09:45 AM   #8
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The only difference between a G&H tire is the number of ply's and the load rating.
Not even that. The number of plies is the same - it's only the rating that is different. These days they don't need more plies to gain in strength - they just use stronger materials.


I think marjoa is totally wrong about the difference in ride and hardness and I'm sure the inflation for a given weight load will be exactly the same. Powercat has already verified that in the GY inlfation tables (see his initial post). A tire is harder only if designed for longer tread mileage - they use harder rubber compounds to make the tread last longer. Two tires of the same model & size will have indentical mileage ratings, regardless of G vs H load ratings.
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Old 10-26-2019, 03:54 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by marjoa View Post
H rated in the front will give you a much harsher ride for sure. Depending on your front axle weight though, and what the manufacturer pressure tables say, you MAY get away with 80-82psi cold pressure or so and that will help some.

The other thing about "H" rated in front is they are so hard, that in bad wet weather you may experience handling issues.

We replaced our Mich Duallys (in the back of course) with Toyo 122 H rated 16 ply tires and are quite happy. That's different.

Steer tires are different than rear tires. They steer, lead into turns, there's only one tire on each side, help tracking down the hwy, etc. Steers are usually a different tread pattern also than what you put on the rear.

As far as max pressure that's on the side wall, either 110 or 120 doesn't mean anything to you IMO. You'll never have that kind of weight in your rig that would warrant that kind of pressure. We have the same kind of MH as you do. We also run about 85-88psi all the way around and we're about 1K under GVWR. And that's with 5psi additional for insurance and possible weight creep.

What you could do is see how they handle and ride. If to harsh and handle bad in wet weather, you could pull those off, put that pair on one of the back duallys, buy another pair for the other duallys and then get a pair of "G" rated for the steers. More money I know. But you'd have the right tires, a much better ride and new tires for the next 5-6yrs.

Good luck my friend.
That is exactly what I did, uprated from G to H. I have not noticed any handling or ride difference in 2 years of use.
The only thing different I've noticed is they run a bit warmer than the old G tires. That IMO is due to the stiffer sidewall flex generating a little more heat.
However the load/inflation chart shows the same air pressure at my weights for both brands, so you know it's safe.


Oop, sorry Gary, didn't mean to duplicate your reply.
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Old 10-26-2019, 05:13 PM   #10
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Thanks for all the responses. So far, I can't tell any difference between the ride and handling of the RM170 Load Range H vs. the OEM Goodyear G670s. This makes sense to me for this particular tire, the max rating difference is only 10%, 4540 lbs. @ 110 psi. vs. 4940 lbs. @ 120 psi .
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Old 10-29-2019, 12:20 PM   #11
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I replaced 6 Goodyear 245/70-19.5 G rated tires with Toyo H rated M143 tires in March 2018. RV was not used until Sept 2018 due to wife breaking her femur (5 hours after I ordered the new tires) but since then we've put over 10,000 miles on the Toyos with no issues. I run them at the 85psi, same as the Goodyears, and the ride has been the same, maybe better above 60mph. If anything, the H-rated Toyos handle better thru the curves, like cloverleaf highway entrances.

Living in Florida, thunderstorms are common and I've found the Toyos handle wet conditions very well. We just completed a 5,000 mile trip out west and the highest tires temps I saw on the TPMS was 107 degrees on a 95 degree day in West Texas. I think you'll be just fine.
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Old 10-29-2019, 02:40 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Gary RVRoamer View Post
Basically no difference if both G & H are inflated to the same pressure. An H-ply rating allows for a higher max psi, but since you need only inflate to the G range, there is no practical difference. A laboratory could probably measure some difference in sidewall flex, but few humans could detect a difference.
Maybe i had to increase the pressure to make the tires wear properly. otherwise they showed underinflation wear pattern
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Old 10-31-2019, 04:49 PM   #13
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Maybe i had to increase the pressure to make the tires wear properly. otherwise they showed underinflation wear pattern

Not if it was the same tire size and the only difference was load range. They carry identical loads at the same pressure.
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