Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > MH-General Discussions & Problems
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-09-2021, 08:24 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
jacwjames's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 9,967
Propane heater

Getting ready to head to colder weather for an extended period trip. Want to be able to boon dock. I have used the coach in cold weather and know that is not insulated and/or cold weather friendly. I had access to power and with the use of space heaters got by.

Contemplating trying to use a propane radiant type heat source in the RV. I do have a furnace and can use that but it is not efficient and drains batteries pretty quick. Recently installed a residential refrigerator so I have to be conscientious of power usage.

I have a hose that I use for my BBQ that is long enough to route into the coach.

Is there a decent Propane heater that would assist in keeping the coach cold.
__________________
Jim J
2002 Monaco Windsor 38 PKD Cummins ISC 350 8.3L
2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee w/5.7 Hemi
jacwjames is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-09-2021, 08:30 AM   #2
Senior Member


 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacwjames View Post
Getting ready to head to colder weather for an extended period trip. Want to be able to boon dock. I have used the coach in cold weather and know that is not insulated and/or cold weather friendly. I had access to power and with the use of space heaters got by.

Contemplating trying to use a propane radiant type heat source in the RV. I do have a furnace and can use that but it is not efficient and drains batteries pretty quick. Recently installed a residential refrigerator so I have to be conscientious of power usage.

I have a hose that I use for my BBQ that is long enough to route into the coach.

Is there a decent Propane heater that would assist in keeping the coach cold.
You should not use a radiant propane heater inside an RV especially when sleeping.

They burn the oxygen and give off carbon monoxide and you might never wake up.

You hear about it all the time when places have power outages or put a non vented heater in an enclosed space.

I have even heard of people dying in tents while using them.
__________________
2006 Winnebago Journey
39K
Cat C7
amosnandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2021, 08:38 AM   #3
Community Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Full timing
Posts: 1,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacwjames View Post
Getting ready to head to colder weather for an extended period trip. Want to be able to boon dock. I have used the coach in cold weather and know that is not insulated and/or cold weather friendly. I had access to power and with the use of space heaters got by.

Contemplating trying to use a propane radiant type heat source in the RV. I do have a furnace and can use that but it is not efficient and drains batteries pretty quick. Recently installed a residential refrigerator so I have to be conscientious of power usage.

I have a hose that I use for my BBQ that is long enough to route into the coach.

Is there a decent Propane heater that would assist in keeping the coach cold.
Take care with the exhaust from a propane heater, it can cause severe issues. You need to make sure it is vented really good.
__________________
2018 Road Warrior 427/2016 golf cart (gas)
2017 Ram 3500 w/Aisin w/4:10
2 Dachshunds DJ (RIP 9-12-19) & Joey (RIP 5-14-21)
hamm2018 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2021, 08:45 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by amosnandy View Post
You should not use a radiant propane heater inside an RV especially when sleeping.

They burn the oxygen and give off carbon monoxide and you might never wake up.

You hear about it all the time when places have power outages or put a non vented heater in an enclosed space.

I have even heard of people dying in tents while using them.
This is true, but...
Mr buddy heaters at least some have a carbon monoxide detector and will shut off.

The real problem I see with propane heat is moisture.
inthepines is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2021, 09:01 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 414
You can and many, many Rver's do use a radiant propane heater safely inside an RV. You just need to get the right kind and use it properly. Read this article, implement these tips and you'll be fine.
https://www.doityourselfrv.com/propa...r-safety-tips/

Here's the one to get with all the safety features:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002G51BZU...street_dp_vv_d

When it's cold outside and your heating the inside of the RV—with any kind of heat—moisture/condensation will be something you have to take care of too. Get you a couple of small dehumidifiers and leave a couple of roof vents cracked open. This venting will help take care of moisture/condensation and also supply fresh air for the RV while using the heater.

Also, even though the above heater has detection sensors, EVERY RV should also have at least a couple of combination Smoke and CO alarms. One in the bedroom and one in the living area will be fine. Replace batteries once a year regardless.

These are just common sense approaches to living in an RV in cold winters.

One other thing I might add. Doing a lot of extra insulation to the RV in areas you wouldn't think of can really help with winter living AND help keep your Rv cooler in the summer. I found an excellent video on YT that should give you some ideas of what to do in your RV.
__________________
Traveling Full Timers
Gas Motorhome
Escapees, Maintenance Freak
mr.tommy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2021, 09:15 AM   #6
Senior Member


 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthepines View Post
This is true, but...
Mr buddy heaters at least some have a carbon monoxide detector and will shut off.

The real problem I see with propane heat is moisture.
Sorry, but I have seen people die from using them. I would not do it. But you are correct. They do create a lot of condensation.
__________________
2006 Winnebago Journey
39K
Cat C7
amosnandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2021, 09:26 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
KanzKran's Avatar


 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 1,868
The Mr. Heater in the link above is only 9000 Btuh on high, which is about the same as a pair of cheap portable electrics. For a coach that size, I don’t think it’s going to be enough. I think better in terms of watts rather than Btuh, though it’s just a matter of units.

Since the typical RV furnace is something in the range of 15000-40000 Btuh, I think you’d be better served adding more solar and batteries and using the furnace.

I also don’t trust the safety features of a non-vented fuel heater, but that’s me. It’s one thing if you’re awake and can (hopefully) feel the signs of CO poisoning, but if you’re asleep, you may never wake up.
__________________
Tom & Jeri
2018 Coachmen Galleria 24T Li3
KanzKran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2021, 09:30 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
jacwjames's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 9,967
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr.tommy View Post
You can and many, many Rver's do use a radiant propane heater safely inside an RV. You just need to get the right kind and use it properly. Read this article, implement these tips and you'll be fine.
https://www.doityourselfrv.com/propa...r-safety-tips/

Here's the one to get with all the safety features:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002G51BZU...street_dp_vv_d

When it's cold outside and your heating the inside of the RV—with any kind of heat—moisture/condensation will be something you have to take care of too. Get you a couple of small dehumidifiers and leave a couple of roof vents cracked open. This venting will help take care of moisture/condensation and also supply fresh air for the RV while using the heater.

Also, even though the above heater has detection sensors, EVERY RV should also have at least a couple of combination Smoke and CO alarms. One in the bedroom and one in the living area will be fine. Replace batteries once a year regardless.

These are just common sense approaches to living in an RV in cold winters.

One other thing I might add. Doing a lot of extra insulation to the RV in areas you wouldn't think of can really help with winter living AND help keep your Rv cooler in the summer. I found an excellent video on YT that should give you some ideas of what to do in your RV.

Thanks for the constructive post.

I am looking at a radiant heater that does have the CO detector.

Just replaced my CO detector & propane detector and installed a new smoke detector so good to go there.


I would probably only used the propane heater while I am awake to take the chill off. Don't mind sleeping in the cold. Last time I winter camped, with access to electric, the bedroom got down into the low 30's. Great for sleeping, not so much for waking up. I have my furnace set so that I can just reach up and flip the switch on the thermostat to get the coach warm.
__________________
Jim J
2002 Monaco Windsor 38 PKD Cummins ISC 350 8.3L
2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee w/5.7 Hemi
jacwjames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2021, 02:02 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Beaver Dam, Wisconsin
Posts: 2,697
Lots of good advice above.

Radiant propane heaters consume O2 and methane based fuel (propane) to produce C02 and water.

Many have an O2 sensor that shuts fuel off when ambient O2 levels drop. CO2 is not poisonous like CO, but you can suffocate in it.

So, you get excessive moisture inside and depleted oxygen inside. This is when they are working properly.

They do not normally produce carbon monoxide. But having a working detector around any gas fired device is much safer. Almost all RV's have or had working CO detectors.

If CO is present and you do not have an alarm, you will not be able to detect it even if you are awake. That is the nature and danger of CO.

CO is tasteless, odorless, and colorless. It binds with red blood cells and block O2 transport. Symptoms are; you fall asleep and then die. When you fall asleep it is too late to take corrective action. Someone else must save you.

I wish you good luck and happy trails ahead!
__________________
Paul Bristol
Kodiak Cub 176RD
Nissan Pathfinder 2015
Persistent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2021, 06:57 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: MI
Posts: 1,021
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthepines View Post
The real problem I see with propane heat is moisture.

You got it. The walls, ceiling, inside and behind the cabinets will be dripping in no time. You can't get away from the fact huge amounts of water vapor are created by radiant propane heaters.

These are a long tunnel, it takes forced air flow to really heat them. If you run the radiant heater it only heats a small part, the rest stays cold and the water vapor condenses. I used one through early December, not super cold and it became a huge problem. Never again, the moisture is there until it gets baked out by the sun and some good hot temperatures.
Argosy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2021, 07:16 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Meshoppen, PA
Posts: 1,227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argosy View Post
You got it. The walls, ceiling, inside and behind the cabinets will be dripping in no time. You can't get away from the fact huge amounts of water vapor are created by radiant propane heaters.
I have used the Mr Buddy in my B+ shuttle conversion, it was not Air tight , we also left the drivers and passenger windows cracked and one in back inn bathroom.. That helped some but windows would drip..

In My Minnie Class C,, I ran the same Mr buddy while I did some reno in 20 degree temps..
AC grille dripped, the front cab over area was soaked.... ..

You need vented heat..
sibe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2021, 08:57 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by amosnandy View Post
Sorry, but I have seen people die from using them. I would not do it. But you are correct. They do create a lot of condensation.
No one is telling you to use them.
I'm just stating there are heaters that will shut down and not kill you.
How you feel about it is really irrelevant to me.
inthepines is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2021, 10:23 AM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
TXiceman's Avatar


 
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Full Time, TX Home Base
Posts: 20,571
Blog Entries: 21
If you plan to use a catalytic propane heater, please add a second CO monitor in the RV. Spend the money and get a good one, not the cheapest one. Also be sure and open a roof vent a bit and also a window a bit for ventilation.

Ken
__________________
Amateur Radio Operator (KE5DFR)|Full-Time! - 2012 6.7L Ford Crew Cab Dually -2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38RLRSB - Travel with one Standard Schnauzer and one small Timneh African Gray Parrot
TXiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2021, 10:41 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
astrnmrtom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,149
We use an Olympian Wave heater when boondocking. Instructions state you much provide 24sq in of ventilation when operating, and have a roof vent cracked open.

They come in three sizes. 8000, 6000 and 3000 BTUs. Small one is only good for very small spaces or mild temps. We have both a 8000 and 3000. There are times when the 8000 will cook us out. Well use the 3 when nights are just "cool."

It's important to note these heaters produce mostly radiant heat. They are like a big infra red floodlight which warms you and objects that the heater faces. It does produce some convective heat. This means for a while you may feel warm, the air in the room is still cool. It's like sitting in front of a campfire on a cold night and after a while the room air will slowly get warmer.

I chose the Olympian Wave because they are very efficient. I used the consumption chart and calculated how long each heater would run at its various settings on both a 20lb portable tanks and our rig's built in 40 gallon tank.

I swapped out or propane refrigerator for residential and added and elbow, extension and a quick connect fitting to the to refrigerator pipe and Teed off the tank and ran a hose through the floor up front so I can plug in the heater. The refrigerator fitting is right outside the bathroom door so I can run the small Wave to heat the bathroom in the AM for showering. Hose fits under the door.

In our RV humidity really hasn't been a problem. Another thing I've done to help is I made some insulated shades for the windows. I covered Reflectix in heavy white canvas like material. I lower the blinds and place the insulated panel in the window valance frame. Makes a big difference in both comfort and reducing condensation on the windows. I slide the panels behind the couch and my small desk on the side wall when not in use. They are also great as blackout shade in the bedroom, and we even use them when summer temps are high and the air conditioners struggle to keep us cool. Because the mini blinds are down, and the fabric is white, they aren't even visible from the outside.
__________________
Tom M. 1998 Safari Serengeti 3706,
300HP Cat 3126 Allison 3060, 600 watts of Solar.
Fisher and Paykel Residential refrigerator
astrnmrtom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
heat, heater, propane



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water Heater Not Working on Propane or Electric; Also Propane Only Going to Stove GearGirl RV Systems & Appliances 6 09-23-2020 02:24 PM
Troubleshooting Refrigerator, Water Heater, Propane Heater on 2000 Coleman Santa Fe? Cheburashka Pop Up, Tent Trailer and Teardrop Topics 6 10-16-2012 06:24 PM
Any Propane Dealers In Central Ohio Area That Works On Propane Leaks? goreds2 iRV2.com General Discussion 4 10-26-2010 08:13 PM
notIt is wise to check propane tanks before buying propane Bruce W iRV2.com General Discussion 4 06-27-2008 03:45 AM
Running propane generator--how long will propane last? glfprncs Class A Motorhome Discussions 5 03-19-2007 06:51 AM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.