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Old 09-29-2021, 05:22 PM   #29
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Several things come to mind. You have a older class C which is the 2 valve engine as opposed to the 3 valve in the later gas motorhomes. Hi mileage is getting to the point where it would be a concern for me especially because of where you live. Don't want to break down on a 115 degree day with family aboard.
If it were me I would opt for the new or newer model diesel pickup. Power up the ying yang, dependable and the most important item to me, an EXHAUST BRAKE to keep your decents down the hills at a safe speed.
One engine to take care of instead of two.
I have had them all but I think the happiest I've been is when I had the 2007 Dodge diesel pulling a 36 Carriage 5th wheel. The 5th wheel weighed right at 17K loaded and sometimes I doubled up with a trailer on the rear hauling my toys. Pulled everything with ease and trouble free.
I presently have a 36ft Tiffin gas which I'm totally happy with except no exhaust brake. In my opinion for what you want to do get the Diesel truck. Drive into the sunset happy and your family safer. Good luck
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Old 09-29-2021, 06:58 PM   #30
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I have a 2015 HR 36ft gasser and no overheating at all engine or trans. Just pulled a crv from Zion to breckenridge 550 miles and some mean grades that it could only do 35 up…gcvw 25k. It did use 1/2 qt of oil though. 18k miles on the RV. Is a little oil use normal going up and down a lot of 6% grades?

Welcome to the forum:

Only 18K miles? That is not really broken in but using a bit of oil would not disturb me a lot but sure would watch it like a hawk of course. Make sure you are using the correct oil as recommended by the mfgr. Double check that oil level when things are cooled down a bit.

You might want to edit your signature to include your RV information. Enjoy this great forum.
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Old 09-30-2021, 06:45 PM   #31
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We've towed our 2 door wrangler for 40K miles up almost every mountain chain in the US. I've never seen the temp gauge vary from it's "normal" setting. I do regret not buying the 4dr wrangler because of what I though was the extra weight, but I've seen folks with the Ford V10 towing F150's with no apparent problems - though I suspect the F150 pushes the limit of the chassis towing rating. The difference between the 2 and 4dr wrangler is (I think) about 700 lbs, plus all the stuff I would put into the Jeep to keep it out of the coach.
Good luck;
Bob '14 Winnebago 37F Adventurer; Jeep toad
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Old 09-30-2021, 07:41 PM   #32
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I don't think anyone has mentioned the need to downshift to achieve an engine RPM that is in the area of the engines peak torque rating to get the best uphill capabilities. The engine may whine a bit but it works well. My 07 Winnebago 31 w/ the Triton V10 climbs hills easily towing a Jeep Wrangler (White Mountains of NH). This engine produces around 457 lb-ft of torque at 3250 rpm.
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Old 09-30-2021, 08:36 PM   #33
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I agree with tom
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Old 09-30-2021, 09:00 PM   #34
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Depends on the engine?

We've been FT for 5+ years: 37' 2004 Newmar Mountain Aire towing a 2007 Honda CRV. Our MH is on a Chevy Workhorse chassis with the 8.1 liter gas engine.
With several trips from the Midwest over the Rockies to Washington, Oregon, and California, we're never had an overheating issue. Even across the Arizona, New Mexico, and West Texas deserts, no overheating.

Once the engine gets warmed up, the temp needle never budges from the exact middle of the dial. (I don't think it reads the actual temp).

Yes, we've really slowed down going up and down some steep grades, sometimes down to 25 mph. But it has never overheated.
I've suspected that most Class C - and the Ford Class A - chassis are slightly underpowered and thus subject to overheating, but I may be wrong. I do think RVing has lost something without the Workhorse and its 8.1 liter engine.

Umm.. Have you weighed your complete rig? Is there any chance your close to or over the gross combined vehicle weight? Could that have an effect? Have you checked to make sure the coolant is really a 50/50 mixture?
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Old 10-01-2021, 08:35 AM   #35
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We had an older 32ft class A with a Chevrolet 7.4L V8.
Driving mountain passes was so stressful. Not only did the transmission temp climb above 200 but our speed could easily be down to 35mph (or lower) during step climbs. We went through one transmission while we had the coach. Plus, talk about stress watching the temp gauge when in stop and go traffic climbing up the pass.
We ended up just disconnecting the Jeep at the chain up area and hooking it back up at the bottom of the pass. It took us less than 5 minutes and took the stress away.
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Old 10-01-2021, 03:33 PM   #36
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Chevy 6.0 Class C

Similiar: I have a 2005 Tioga 22B with a 6.0 Chevy Gasser/4L80 tranny with just under 50,000 miles. Just got back from the San Juans and pulled 3 10,000' +. passes. Trans cooked up to 258 degrees and engine up to 224 degrees pulling a 2004 2 dr. Rubicon with 2 E Bikes. Probably a little overloaded for the Express 3500 Chassis. I have a Derale remote trans cooler with a dedicated fan mounted underneath and another Derale 9000 series tranny cooler up front. I have the scan II OBD monitor so I am seeing real time temps. It screams up hill @ 4,500 RPMs in 1st gear and it is LOUD so I usually upshift to 2nd but mostly slow go at around 32-3500 rps and pulls the steepest part of the passes at around 30-35 mph but sometimes down to 25 mph. Other than the steepest part of these(highest) mountain passes in the U.S. Tranny normally runs around 160-190 degrees on the flats. Do not know how long the 4L80 is going to last but will probably have it gone through B-4 heading to Alaska next year.
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Old 10-01-2021, 08:54 PM   #37
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You really have to determine why a modern vehicle that is not overloaded is overheating since its often down to just a few basic things being air flow, coolant flow and fuel charge.

On an old high mileage Class C one would have to first check to see if there are any missing air dams and ground scoops that would aid in maintaining proper air flow through the engine compartment and ensure that nothing has been installed that impedes airflow along with ensure that the radiator is not partially blocked off by leaves, nests, etc. You would also want to verify that the fan clutch is still working and has not failed completely and that any electric fans are working at full speed and not partially bound up, etc reducing their capacity.

Motor homes are on the Severe Maintenance Schedule so the coolant needs to be flushed and refilled every two years or there will be buildup that will reduce cooling efficiency. If coolant flushes have been skipped then its time for a remedial flush and possibly time for a new thermostat. If you're having problems even after a good flush with verified good coolant flow adding Water Wetter or a Super Coolant Additive such as the one from Lucas can greatly increase thermal transfer.

See: https://lucasoil.com/products/proble.../super-coolant
https://www.redlineoil.com/waterwetter


Gas engines run hot when the fuel charge is running lean or too low octane fuel is used. Sometimes this can be due to partially clogged fuel injectors or on older motor homes with carburetors from dirty fuel filters, clogged jets, low carburetor float settings or intentional leaning of the fuel system to get better MPG.

First thing is to add a great fuel system cleaner at a heavy dosage to ensure everything is as clean as possible without having to strip down the system and clean everything manually. Berrymans B12 Fuel System Cleaner is a cut above many of the others that are often just Alcohol such as Seafoam which is a good and quite popular "go to" fuel system cleaner used by many.

Sometimes on a fuel injected engine you do need to have a mechanic put it on the computer to ensure the fuel trim mappings are correct and don't need to be updated or perhaps the old oxygen sensor is giving a false rich reading causing the computer to try and run leaner than it should. Sometimes a mechanic using the wrong RTV gasket sealant can kill your oxygen sensor and cause fuel trim issues.

The other things are the common sense items like slowing down and driving under the max speed of the 65 to 75 mph tires found on many motor homes. Most are only speed rated at moderate temperatures so pushing them to their max is not wise when the temperatures are reaching the triple digits.

Most times though there is no real need to put in a bigger radiator etc in a vehicle made over the past 30 years except for in a relatively few specific cases since the ECU and other systems have been pretty good at managing heat if properly maintained.


Myself I have towed an SUV behind my 2001 Adventurer on the F53 chassis all through the Appellation, Poconos, Catskill and White Mountains through record breaking heatwaves with no overheating issues.
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Old 10-01-2021, 10:45 PM   #38
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All but the flush

I've done all but a recent radiator flush & new thermostat. Air dam in place, put a pusher fan in front of Condenser and eliminated the chrome strip on front of Express with a mesh screen which adds about 30% air moving through radiator. Did this and added Water Wetter and water temp went from a high of 240 to max of 223. 6.0 has high flow cats and 3" exhaust. Have also ran BG44K through fuel system and, from my readings, believe that fan clutch is working fine. I believe that I have the eng. temp under control but am concerned about the extreme tranny temps. Currently waiting for a Black Bear computer upgrade that , according to black bear, will add 10% more HP to the current 305 and 1-2 MPG. I am thinking of adding a second Derale tranny cooler with fan.
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Old 10-02-2021, 11:57 AM   #39
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Towing in the hot AZ mountains .

The truth is they are all going to run a little hotter in the mountains towing anything. Your most expensive Rvs will run hotter than normal . But the plain simple truth is if you run in the mountains most of the time get a diesel. Even though you pay more for fuel you will get the same results in dollars totalling. Gas is going to down shift a lot more using more fuel. My gas rig 34' f53 v10 could stay right in line with the 350 diesel and of course rev higher going down hill passing the diesel and losing going up hill , but to keep up with the diesel I would only get 4.5 miles to the gallon pulling a nissan suv.
I would really make sure you get the right engine in a diesel because they over heat to. And the repair are off the charts . If you fortunate and have deep pockets diesel is the way to go in the mountains . Spent years in the AZ mountains summer and winter.
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Old 10-02-2021, 08:49 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RussellAM View Post
Hello,

The wife and I are at a crossroads. We plan on upgrading our gas class c to either a gas class A towing a jeep wrangler, or getting a diesel truck and toyhauler with toys. I think we'd prefer the gas class A option, but one big concern keeps us from moving forward: towing a 4 door jeep wrangler in hot weather (think 100-120 degrees) going up mountains.

As we live in vegas, we often like to leave the city during the worst of the heat and head up to the mountains with the RV. That seems to be precisely the worst possible time, as we've experienced the class c motorhome engine overheating a few times, the dash AC dying majority of the ride, and the generator going out as well (possibly due to the excessive heat), which cuts out our coach AC. Makes for a hot ride. Because of this it's pushed us towards what we consider a more reliable ride, which is the diesel truck.

I've scoured the forums and see both alot of people saying they have no problems towing a 4-5000lb wrangler up mountain passes with a gas class A, as well as people mentioning over-heating is common and having to do tricks like turning off the AC, turning up the heat, down shifting, unhooking the toad, taking 20 min breaks on the ascent to let the engine cool down. I'm trying to get a sense if these are all common issues that just come with the territory of the hot mountainous southwest, or if our current motorhome is just not functioning correctly and we can expect a better experience with a different gas MH.

So people who have towed with a gas motorhome, pulling something heavy like a wrangler, going up hills/mountains in hot summer weather, what are your real life experiences?

Thanks!
We have the V10, 320 hp, 6.8 l, 6 speed in our 2019 Georgetown 34H5 and have never had to turn off any accessories or had overheating issues. I think everyone's situation is different possibly depending on mileage, year of MH, amount of weight your carrying or engine rating. It can all vary depending on different scenarios.
I also do not let the RPMs get too high if I can help it. We don't care how fast we're going or who is passing us and just try to enjoy the ride.
We are able to carry on normal conversations even though it can get a little loud going up various grades of inclines.
Wishing you the best
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Old 10-03-2021, 06:55 AM   #41
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Test the new thermostat!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nvs4602 View Post
Have you had the coolant and radiator flushed.? While doing that I would put new thermostat in and new hoses. Also have the radiator fins cleaned. I use Frost King ACF19 Foam Coil Cleaner to clean the radiator. Also works good on roof air condenser.
Just did a first flush on a 99 F53 (25k) recently . New coolant, reservoir and thermostat (NAPA brand). It overheated within the first 80 miles from home. The thermostat failed. Luckily, I kept the original with me. Did a roadside swap with my energetic 2 year-old granddaughter on board. Not particularly fun considering the whole maintenance action was to prevent such an event. I will forever test any new thermostats in hot water prior to installation.

Hope the OP gets the issue worked out.
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Old 10-03-2021, 07:13 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by 14OTR View Post
I've done all but a recent radiator flush & new thermostat. Air dam in place, put a pusher fan in front of Condenser and eliminated the chrome strip on front of Express with a mesh screen which adds about 30% air moving through radiator. Did this and added Water Wetter and water temp went from a high of 240 to max of 223. 6.0 has high flow cats and 3" exhaust. Have also ran BG44K through fuel system and, from my readings, believe that fan clutch is working fine. I believe that I have the eng. temp under control but am concerned about the extreme tranny temps. Currently waiting for a Black Bear computer upgrade that , according to black bear, will add 10% more HP to the current 305 and 1-2 MPG. I am thinking of adding a second Derale tranny cooler with fan.

Tranny temps often rise due to band slippage which can be made worse if you change the fluid without having the bands adjusted. Some mechanics will save the old fluid if it isn't badly burned just in case putting in new fluid caused problems with slippage even after the bands have been readjusted. A good transmission shop will also check the lag between shifts and adjust that since while extended lag will make the shifts appear smoother they also allow the bands to slip for longer periods between shifts creating more heat. Back in the day we used to put a B&M Transmission Shift Pack in to shorting the shifts and reduced the heat generated. This would also reduce fuel consumption especially in stop and go traffic.


Putting on a cooler while good does not eliminate the need to check band adjustment and shift timing.
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