RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Toads and Motorhome Related Towing
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-22-2019, 06:39 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by F4Gary View Post
Radar, it appears you do not tow a toad.
You tow a trailer with a car on it.
I haven't seen any literature that says any EV can be towed 4 down.


Also, when Porsche, Audi, and MB come out with their EVs, Tesla will have a huge problem competing.

That’s sort of correct Gary. We tow an EV on a trailer or dolly. So we definetly use an EV as a Toad. Just not a “4 down Toad”.

That’s why I said there are several YouTube videos of folks who have toyed with this idea of towing 4 down with an EV but it always comes down to the voided warranty thing.

No doubt there is more competition for Tesla coming although presently there are no production EV’s from those companies that compete in their market or price point. And of course for at least some time Tesla will maintain the advantage of the Tesla Supercharger network.

My guess is within 5 years Tesla will lose half of their 80 percent market share. Mostly because of all the European and Korean EV’s coming to market. It remains to be seen if any other of the big three will have high production EV’s by then.
radar is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-22-2019, 06:44 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcussen View Post
May be true now, but what is the range in "ludicrous" mode?
You know Porsche will need to "one up" Tesla.
I have no doubt. . I think Porsche’s has done some seriously fast charging testing as well. Something like 350 KW. They are developing their own special stations for that. Should be interesting.
radar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2019, 03:45 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
jcussen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 2,729
Radar, a question about charging, I know Tesla has a proprietary nation wide system, but if you have a Leaf, Bolt, I Pace, Soul EV, Smart EV, etc, and you need a fast charge away from home, how many of these stations are available? I know you can probably charge any of these cars from a 110 socket on the road, but for a fast charge, is there a standard voltage and current requirement, and most important, a standardized connection that any EV [except Tesla] can use?
__________________
Foretravel tag axle 40 ft. 500 hp/1550 ft/lbs ism 1455 watts on the roof. 600 a/h's lithium down below.
jcussen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2019, 03:56 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcussen View Post
Radar, a question about charging, I know Tesla has a proprietary nation wide system, but if you have a Leaf, Bolt, I Pace, Soul EV, Smart EV, etc, and you need a fast charge away from home, how many of these stations are available? I know you can probably charge any of these cars from a 110 socket on the road, but for a fast charge, is there a standard voltage and current requirement, and most important, a standardized connection that any EV [except Tesla] can use?
Yes. So non Tesla EV’s either use Chademo (mostly Japanese and Korean EV’s) or CCS. The Chademo/CCS networks have been growing quite rapidly although they haven’t caught up to the Tesla Supercharger network.

Most DC fast charge stations are equipped with both standards. Chademo and CCS.

There is a website and/or App called plugshare that allows you to see where these are located. You can tell it to display what you are looking for.

Level 1 charging is 120 AC volts. Common at home.
Level 2 charging is 240 AC volts. Common at home.

Both level 1 and 2 use a J1772 plug and format that every EV uses including Tesla although they use a small adapter that adapts the pins.

Level 3 is DC fast charging. Instead of using the cars on board charger to convert the AC to DC the electronics are in the charging station and DC is sent directly to the battery at rates between 50 and 150 KW.

The vast amount of charging is done at home. DC fast charging is meant for road trips when you are away from home.

This is a screen capture showing DC fast chargers in North America. More literally every day.

radar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2019, 04:15 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
jcussen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 2,729
Quote:
Originally Posted by radar View Post
Yes. So non Tesla EVís either use Chademo (mostly Japanese and Korean EVís) or CCS. The Chademo/CCS networks have been growing quite rapidly although they havenít caught up to the Tesla Supercharger network.

Most DC fast charge stations are equipped with both standards. Chademo and CCS.

There is a website and/or App called plugshare that allows you to see where these are located. You can tell it to display what you are looking for.

Level 1 charging is 120 AC volts. Common at home.
Level 2 charging is 240 AC volts. Common at home.

Both level 1 and 2 use a J1772 plug and format that every EV uses including Tesla although they use a small adapter that adapts the pins.

Level 3 is DC fast charging. Instead of using the cars on board charger to convert the AC to DC the electronics are in the charging station and DC is sent directly to the battery at rates between 50 and 150 KW.

The vast amount of charging is done at home. DC fast charging is meant for road trips when you are away from home.

This is a screen capture showing DC fast chargers in North America. More literally every day.

Way more than I expected. Do you pay by the kw/hr, or type of charge or both?
__________________
Foretravel tag axle 40 ft. 500 hp/1550 ft/lbs ism 1455 watts on the roof. 600 a/h's lithium down below.
jcussen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2019, 04:33 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,862
The simple answer is “yes” to both scenarios. It depends on the province or state as some are not allowed to sell by KWH and must sell by time instead.

Either way, DC fast charging is not necessarily a good deal. Usually it is about double to triple the amount you pay at home. For those who have special off peak hour rates at home it can be much more expensive than at home. We as EVers actually encourage this as we don’t want people to use these like gas stations and causing line ups. Charging is done at home and if you are on a road trip then use a DC fast charge. This is why there will probably never be a need for as many fast chargers as gas stations. You can’t gas up at home with a gas or diesel car, so you need more gas stations. However with an electric the vast majority of charging you do will always be at home...except for road trips.

Around where we live the fast chargers are about 20 cents per kWh with a 1 dollar min fee. We use fast chargers maybe half a dozen times per year.

Hope that helps.
radar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2019, 06:42 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
hohenwald48's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Nashville, TN area
Posts: 4,006
Something else to think about, regen braking/charging of an EV in tow (if it was even possible to flat tow it) would place all kinds of unintended strains and stresses on the tow bar since the toad would be trying to slow the motorhome.

In a properly adjust supplemental brake system on a conventional toad the brakes should not be placing any drag on the motorhome via the tow bar. The motorhome brakes stop the motorhome and the toad brakes stop the toad.

Don't know it it would be a problem or not but something to consider.
__________________
When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.
2019 Newmar Canyon Star 3627 on a 2018 F-53 26K chassis w/6 speed transmission
2017 Jeep Wrangler JKU with Ready Brute tow system
Nashville, TN or Titusville, FL when not on the road
hohenwald48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2019, 07:12 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
jcussen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 2,729
The new Tesla?
https://www.fool.com/investing/2018/...powerhous.aspx
__________________
Foretravel tag axle 40 ft. 500 hp/1550 ft/lbs ism 1455 watts on the roof. 600 a/h's lithium down below.
jcussen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2019, 09:10 PM   #37
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 3,026
Quote:
Originally Posted by hohenwald48 View Post
Something else to think about, regen braking/charging of an EV in tow (if it was even possible to flat tow it) would place all kinds of unintended strains and stresses on the tow bar since the toad would be trying to slow the motorhome.

In a properly adjust supplemental brake system on a conventional toad the brakes should not be placing any drag on the motorhome via the tow bar. The motorhome brakes stop the motorhome and the toad brakes stop the toad.

Don't know it it would be a problem or not but something to consider.
Good point. And donít forget, the Tesla is not flat towable.
RVPioneer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2019, 09:54 PM   #38
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by RVPioneer View Post
Good point. And donít forget, the Tesla is not flat towable.
Somebody needs to buy a written off Tesla and do some fun experiments. Volunteers??? .
radar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2019, 04:17 PM   #39
Senior Member
 
Corkey's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington State
Posts: 229
I can't help but wonder how long the tires would last being forced to roll against regeneration, which is essentially braking. I see rubber flying pretty quick.
__________________
Corkey & Dana

2008 HR Endeavor (DIP) PDQ
Corkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2019, 04:18 PM   #40
Junior Member
 
davewilson2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by F4Gary View Post
Radar, it appears you do not tow a toad.
You tow a trailer with a car on it.
I haven't seen any literature that says any EV can be towed 4 down.
I've had two EVs. Leaf and Bolt. Neither can be towed '4 down'. Well, you could but the manufacturers say "NO"... your choice.

My Leaf was a 2014, I think that's 1st gen, and the top range was listed as 83 miles (something close to that) not the 200km the poster claimed. Most I ever got was 75.

I think that you'd have more success towing a Chevy Bolt on a trailer. It's a very small footprint and gets over 200 miles of mixed driving on a full charge.
davewilson2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2019, 04:35 PM   #41
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by davewilson2 View Post
I've had two EVs. Leaf and Bolt. Neither can be towed '4 down'. Well, you could but the manufacturers say "NO"... your choice.

My Leaf was a 2014, I think that's 1st gen, and the top range was listed as 83 miles (something close to that) not the 200km the poster claimed. Most I ever got was 75.

I think that you'd have more success towing a Chevy Bolt on a trailer. It's a very small footprint and gets over 200 miles of mixed driving on a full charge.
Yah. Ours is also a first generation but with the 30Kwh battery. 2016 and 2017 for the SV and SL trim. We are good for about 200 around here. Highway speeds are like 90 km/h Max, maybe the odd passing stretch to 100kmh. Makes a distance in the range.

Gen 2 cars are 250 km or 370 km depending on the battery you select. 2018 and 2019.

Interesting question on the tires. Don’t know but yah you would think that may have an effect.

Not willing to find out.
radar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2019, 05:02 PM   #42
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clomok View Post
I wonder how hard it would be to make a wireless brake controller to a Tesla braking.
LOL, I think I am at the extreme other end of that thought. I am looking for a light weight fiberglass kit car on a Beetle chassis to pull behind my Vista 21B. LOL
Neisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
toad



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tesla Home Battery jmckinley RV Systems & Appliances 2 07-23-2015 10:59 AM
Tesla to unveil household Battery within months CountryFit Going Green 9 05-10-2015 05:16 PM
Tesla unveils 7kw battery pack for $3,000 avid_dk iRV2.com General Discussion 17 05-03-2015 08:44 AM
Tesla T3212 smarty Toy Haulers Discussion 1 11-27-2014 10:05 AM
EverGreen Unveils Full-Sized Tesla Toy Hauler DriVer RV Industry Press 3 06-07-2014 03:03 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.