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Old 11-06-2020, 08:15 AM   #43
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I made a very similar set up for my TT. 3 separate pieces that vary the height as needed. The top piece has a 4x4 screwed to one end to serve as a wheel chock. I placed sheet metal screws on the surface to eliminate any chance of siding (think studded snow tires). If I have to stack them for greater height, I pin them together with carriage bolts dropped through a hole drilled through all of them. My wife is particular on being level, so she helps me setup until the bubble is centered. When not in use, I tapped the rear bumper and threaded all thread into it and placed the bolt the same location as the other holes used for carriage bolts. Bumper good location for these and stinky slinky.
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Old 11-06-2020, 10:49 AM   #44
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I used Rope in between the layers of wood on mine to help make them easier to pick up. I have a storage box that all wood goes in. chock blocks, tire change blocks.
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Old 11-08-2020, 03:44 PM   #45
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Fine for single axle I suspect. With a dual the length is excessive for travel plus not adaptable to variable terrain. Nice job though.
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Old 11-08-2020, 11:35 PM   #46
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Missed that, but nice to see great minds think alike........lol
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Old 11-09-2020, 07:37 AM   #47
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Fine for single axle I suspect. With a dual the length is excessive for travel plus not adaptable to variable terrain. Nice job though.
I have single axle. Between these and my two packs of "Lego" building blocks, II should be able to adapt to most situations with my rig. Just nice to have a couple blocks that can be quickly used in most simple situations. My last trip I just needed to block up the front.
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Old 11-12-2020, 07:01 PM   #48
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10" low in back

Last site we were on was at least 12" low in the back. Auto leveling on 3" on plywood got us to within a couple inches. Couldn't get any better manually, and still get the step out. By the 2nd day the weight (33k lbs) had pushed the plywood an inch or more into the soft ground (lots of rain in NC lately). We could sort of tell, but the fridge was on electric and there was no danger of rolling out of bed, so all in all, good site, good trip. I can't carry enough wood for that situation... but I do want a sturdy lightweight shelf over my propane tank! Rigid aluminum maybe?
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Old 11-12-2020, 09:57 PM   #49
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I got tired playing with those Lego leveling blocks. I had previously made a smaller two level set like these, but it was really old wood and beginning to crack. These go from 1.5" up to 4.5".

Seems like most of the time I only need to boost up two tires to get close enough for the fridge to work right. I placed the handles so they balance when I carry them. Where I was parked a few days ago I needed about another 1.5" and these would have been perfect.
Excellent job ... and a fine solution for long term use. I've found very few campsites that don't need leveling -> including the hard surfaced asphalt or conrete pads in commercial campgrounds.

I made five of the same thing 14-15 years ago out of redwood planks for rot-proof durability, and have used that same set ever since. If I was to use anything but redwood, it would be marine grade plywood.

I made and carry five for the worst-case situation of having to raise all four rear tires and one front tire ... and have had to do this a few times.

Ocassionally I get a split in one of them which I "fix" by driving in from the side of the splitting plank one or more 4 1/2" or 5" deck screws. Usually this occurs in the bottom level board. Use of long screws to fix any splits works like a champ to keep them rigid and strong.

Good luck with your handywork!
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Old 11-13-2020, 08:21 PM   #50
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Last site we were on was at least 12" low in the back. Auto leveling on 3" on plywood got us to within a couple inches. Couldn't get any better manually, and still get the step out. By the 2nd day the weight (33k lbs) had pushed the plywood an inch or more into the soft ground (lots of rain in NC lately). We could sort of tell, but the fridge was on electric and there was no danger of rolling out of bed, so all in all, good site, good trip. I can't carry enough wood for that situation... but I do want a sturdy lightweight shelf over my propane tank! Rigid aluminum maybe?
Wow! 12" is a lot to level. Not knowing your rig I don't know what to use for a shelf over the propane tank, but I do feel fortunate that they put one crossbody in that compartment, also in the next compartment there's a crossbody shelf above the storage that I could put a long folding table or anything.

The past few days I camped on BLM land, and I didn't have to use any leveling. Was able just to park and then move forward and backwards until it was just right. Love that BLM land, it's free!

By the way for anyone going out to Joshua Tree North, I was really confused where the BLM land was. I finally found its off Sunfair, a few miles east of the West entrance to the park. Turn north on Sunfair off of 62, then go up a few miles to Broadway, you will see a white picket fence on the right, and the road is paved to a certain point. Rght after that pavement stops you can start parking anywhere.

I parked just off the pavement about 500 yards, but there's a road that goes down to a dry lake as well. Coyote Lake. And there ARE coyotes there, every morning about 5:30 they were all howling!
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Old 11-13-2020, 08:47 PM   #51
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I see that you put the top layer of wood at right angles to the other two layers. I think if you put that cross layer in the middle you may have the "plywood" effect with what you have there. Some good wood glue (think aircraft spruce for supplier) and some 2.5 or 2.75" SS deck screws and I think you would have a set that would last a lifetime. I was kind of thinking of doing the same thing with oak but then I thought about how heave oak would be and I think pine may be a better choice. If you can find some regular pine boards, (not treated) that doesn't have any of the heartwood in the middle they don't seem to crack so easily, but they're hard to find. I'm going to have to do this soon as a new coach is going to be mine before spring.
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Old 11-14-2020, 05:13 PM   #52
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I see that you put the top layer of wood at right angles to the other two layers. I think if you put that cross layer in the middle you may have the "plywood" effect with what you have there. Some good wood glue (think aircraft spruce for supplier) and some 2.5 or 2.75" SS deck screws and I think you would have a set that would last a lifetime. I was kind of thinking of doing the same thing with oak but then I thought about how heave oak would be and I think pine may be a better choice. If you can find some regular pine boards, (not treated) that doesn't have any of the heartwood in the middle they don't seem to crack so easily, but they're hard to find. I'm going to have to do this soon as a new coach is going to be mine before spring.
The wood I used is douglas fir. The top section is sideways because I ran out of 1 x 10.

Actually if I did it again what I might do is sandwich each plank with 1/2" plywood with all kinds of glue and screws. In fact if these start splitting I might just put plywood on the top of each step with glue and screws. Even 1/4" or 3/8" could be used for to sandwich each side of the planks. Would be like making plywood with a huge core 😎
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Old 11-23-2020, 11:49 AM   #53
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Have been up and down on the blocks a few times while working under it in the backyard on some really uneven bricks. No cracks yet.
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Old 11-23-2020, 02:00 PM   #54
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Have been up and down on the blocks a few times while working under it in the backyard on some really uneven bricks. No cracks yet.
As I've mentioned earlier in this thread - if, or as, they crack eventually - just buy 5 inch deck screws (with square drive or hex drive heads) from Home Depot and screw 2-3 of them into the side of block from the side of the block closest to where the crack is running end-to-end-wise in the wood. Pre-drill the hole in as far as a small drill bit will reach, and also pre-drill a sunken head cone into the entrance of the hole so that the head of the screw won't crack the block as you tighten it down into the wood.

Doing the above to keep them intack -> so far my redwood blocks are at least 10 years old with some cracks in them repaired as I describe above. Also, it's no big deal if I did have to make a replacement step block once in awile.

P.S. You might want to carry along some short pieces of 2X4 material to put under the high ends of a step blocks between the blocks and the ground in case the highest step isn't high enough when camping on too-slanted surfaces.
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Old 11-23-2020, 02:42 PM   #55
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As I've mentioned earlier in this thread - if, or as, they crack eventually - just buy 5 inch deck screws (with square drive or hex drive heads) from Home Depot and screw 2-3 of them into the side of block from the side of the block closest to where the crack is running end-to-end-wise in the wood. Pre-drill the hole in as far as a small drill bit will reach, and also pre-drill a sunken head cone into the entrance of the hole so that the head of the screw won't crack the block as you tighten it down into the wood.

Doing the above to keep them intack -> so far my redwood blocks are at least 10 years old with some cracks in them repaired as I describe above. Also, it's no big deal if I did have to make a replacement step block once in awile.

P.S. You might want to carry along some short pieces of 2X4 material to put under the high ends of a step blocks between the blocks and the ground in case the highest step isn't high enough when camping on too-slanted surfaces.
I get what you're saying and that's a great suggestion. In fact if they do split I'd put some glue down in the split, and then put several long screws horizontally. I really think having that plywood on the bottom gives them a lot of extra strength though. I actually was a little worried about using them on this uneven brick, but decided to go for it. In fact I think using my old ones on this brick is what cracked them, but they didn't have plywood on the bottom.
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Old 11-28-2020, 01:27 PM   #56
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I use PVC trim boards, 1x10, cut into ~14 pieces. Theyre very light weight, last forever, impervious to weather, and will flex enough to conform to the ground if needed.

I find the 3/4 dimension more useful, more often, than 2x4 lumber. I still carry some 2x10 blocks just in case I need some real heighth.
Just checked Home Depot and will be cutting my boards soon.
Best idea yet.
Thankyou!
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