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Old 07-03-2019, 04:39 PM   #1
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True Four Season Class C

Hello All,

Tried the search but can't find anything.
Are there any true four season class C motor homes?
We are thinking of downsizing for various reasons and have a need for a class C that we can use comfortably to cross Nevada both South and North during our annual migration to and from Arizona.

Thanks for any help. Bob
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Old 07-03-2019, 06:00 PM   #2
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I don't know of or seen any true 4 season class c RVs. We have heated wet bays and tank heat pads buy I would not call 4 season. You may be able to get dual pane Windows. We have camped in low teen winter weather but you burn through propane. That's needed for the heated wet bays.
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Old 07-03-2019, 06:11 PM   #3
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You might want to research Airstream, they may offer something that comes close;

https://www.airstream.com/touring-coaches/
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Old 07-03-2019, 08:34 PM   #4
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I am not sure what you are looking for temps wise. We spend winters in south TX with no problems. I will be more concerned about summer temps in Arizona.
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Old 07-03-2019, 09:40 PM   #5
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I don't think you are going to find any class C's that are true 4 season models, as they are too weight constrained trying to fit a coach on a 12,500 to 14,500 pound chassis.
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Old 07-05-2019, 05:20 PM   #6
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Thanks for the answers all. Possible that we are looking for something that doesn't exist. The cold weather that we encounter is going South and North across Nevada to and from the Yuma area in the winter. We might look at Small class a models as they seem more likely to have enclosed heated tanks and plumbing

Thanks again, Bob
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Old 07-05-2019, 05:35 PM   #7
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My SunSeeker has that but its not considered 4 season. We have camped in the winter in January in Gettysburg Pa with temps overnight in the middle teens. You either need to run the propane main heat to keep the wet bays warm or add an electric heater to them. I don't think any rv is true 4 season other then one of those northern Ice Fishing units.
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Old 07-05-2019, 09:28 PM   #8
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Here is a picture of a 31 ft 2003 Safari Trek in the snow, it is owned by one of the frequent posters over on the Trek Tracks message board. Trek's have fairly substantial insulation, the vast majority have double pane windows (all except some 2002 Trek Sports), heated basements (most with propane furnace basement vents, some electric), and enclosed tanks at least after 1996, some have optional "arctic" packages with tank heater pads.


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Old 07-05-2019, 09:42 PM   #9
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Great question for which I have been researching as well. Looking at a Dynamax and can never seem to get a firm answer on whether the coach is four season, or not.

If anyone knows if Dynamax is or is not a true four season coach I am all ears.
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Old 07-06-2019, 01:54 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rvrat View Post
Hello All,

Tried the search but can't find anything.
Are there any true four season class C motor homes?
We are thinking of downsizing for various reasons and have a need for a class C that we can use comfortably to cross Nevada both South and North during our annual migration to and from Arizona.

Thanks for any help. Bob
The answer depends upon what you mean by "four season".

In general what to look for regarding cold outside temperature RV'ing might not even be designated as a "four season" RV, but should consist of: As small a Class C as you can tolerate, with -

1. All fresh water plumbing contained within/behind the heated interior's cabinetry areas.
2. Heated grey water and black water tanks, preferrable heated with 12V pads so that the tanks can be kept warm when driving without having to run the coach furnace to keep them warm.
3. As large a furnace capacity as available/possible that also has ducted outlets that can be aimed and air volume controlled.
4. As large a propane tank as possible to supply the large furnace.
5. Sections of the coach that can be blocked off (plus their heating outlets colosed) to reduce heat loss and heating capacity needs (and hence propane use), while allowing for a reasonable degree of comfort within the non-blocked-off smaller heated area.
6. Double pane windows.
7. Vent covers over all rooftop vents.
8. As large as possible coach battery capacity ... and maybe as large as can be fit engine starting battery.
9. A built-in generator for maybe emergency use in extreme cold for few hours to run a couple of electric heaters to direct heat to specific interior areas or supplement the propane furnace's heating capacity.
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Old 11-18-2019, 02:40 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil G. View Post
The answer depends upon what you mean by "four season".

In general what to look for regarding cold outside temperature RV'ing might not even be designated as a "four season" RV, but should consist of: As small a Class C as you can tolerate, with -

1. All fresh water plumbing contained within/behind the heated interior's cabinetry areas.
2. Heated grey water and black water tanks, preferrable heated with 12V pads so that the tanks can be kept warm when driving without having to run the coach furnace to keep them warm.
3. As large a furnace capacity as available/possible that also has ducted outlets that can be aimed and air volume controlled.
4. As large a propane tank as possible to supply the large furnace.
5. Sections of the coach that can be blocked off (plus their heating outlets colosed) to reduce heat loss and heating capacity needs (and hence propane use), while allowing for a reasonable degree of comfort within the non-blocked-off smaller heated area.
6. Double pane windows.
7. Vent covers over all rooftop vents.
8. As large as possible coach battery capacity ... and maybe as large as can be fit engine starting battery.
9. A built-in generator for maybe emergency use in extreme cold for few hours to run a couple of electric heaters to direct heat to specific interior areas or supplement the propane furnace's heating capacity.
Electric heat pads donít make it. You need to run generator all night and on cold still nights CO leaks in.

Arctic Fox trailers and campers are true four season. Unfortunately they donít do motorhomes (yet).
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Old 11-18-2019, 02:48 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by rvrat View Post
Thanks for the answers all. Possible that we are looking for something that doesn't exist. The cold weather that we encounter is going South and North across Nevada to and from the Yuma area in the winter. We might look at Small class a models as they seem more likely to have enclosed heated tanks and plumbing

Thanks again, Bob
Iím in exactly your position (literally...but Boise county).

Previously had Arctic Fox trailer and pickup camper. They do it right but donít do Class Cs.

I got a Leprechaun a couple years ago, replacing AFs. It has all they offer for cold weather, including dual pane windows, two valves on tanks, and tank heaters. That approach sucks miserably.

Using tank heaters requires generator which leaks CO into unit on still cold nights. Very stupid idea.

I too am now turning to small Class A or Super C.
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Old 11-18-2019, 03:08 PM   #13
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If you are going to run a class C generator all the time including over night then I recommend getting the exhaust stack. I have been at National Drag meets and these are used all the time. Never had a co dector alarm using one.
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Old 11-18-2019, 03:35 PM   #14
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Coach house rv

Try coach house rv
Downsized and 4 season I think
R 18 insulation
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