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Old 08-14-2022, 09:00 AM   #1
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Class A Boondocking HELP!

Need opinions on the many different sites for class A boondocking. When I ask for same, I get such general answers. I can in some cases locate suggested camp sites on google earth or G maps and get a general idea of when and where but no info on low tree limbs, super pot holes, or if in general is the entry too rough for a class A. Is anyone familiar with any of the sites that offer personal experiences of accessibility? Looking at Gearth and the sort cannot zoom in close enough to actually see quality of access. I have tried the free versions of several sites but dont know if the paid version offers up the sort of info Im looking for.
Getting SO TIRED of paying 50-70$ a night to sleep in a car lot of motorhomes.
Searching for a means to achieve a little peace. thanks for any comments.
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Old 08-14-2022, 09:27 AM   #2
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All of the boondocking that I have seen requires traveling on gravel or dirt roadsÖ.many of which are not well maintained. Tree limbs, pot holes, etc are going to be encountered.

Now drydocking is better because you are entering marked campsites, which are still very primitive, but better maintained (usually).

Quartzite, AZ is different because itís in the dessert, hard packed sand, no trees. Almost any vehicle can boondock there.
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Old 08-14-2022, 09:53 AM   #3
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I do a lot of boondocking in my class A, My go to app is iOverlander, I usually find several possible spots in the area im interested in and use the Jeep to scout them when we arrive before driving the MH off road. I look at google maps but like you canít tell for sure. If the spot is somewhat close to the highway theres a better chance. In iOverlander Lotís of times people leave comments if theres big rig access or not on the app. We went to Southern Utah and Arizona last fall and Boondocked for almost 2 months in national forests and BLM land.
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Old 08-14-2022, 11:19 AM   #4
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Do you ever camp at public campgrounds? These include NPs, SPs, USFS, COE, BLM and county campgrounds. Some of the SP and USFS sites are quite remote, NP and county parks less so. We camp in several NE state parks and in one we camped at last week the nearest campsite was about 50 yds away. Most are usually closer though, as little as 100'.

These usually have RV length restrictions (recommendations really) noted if you click on a site using ReserveAmerica for reservations. I usually add at least 5' to the noted length limit as these are often based on getting a TT in with its TV, not an RV, although longer RVs have turning radius issues that may limit you. I have never had a problem with my 25' long Thor Axis Class A if ReserveAmerica said a 20' or greater maximum length. A ranger once told me "If you can get it in, we don't care about the length limit.

Some of these sites do have overhanging trees especially on the driveway down to the site. I must admit I have torn off a couple of awning and slide out cover end caps doing this.

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Old 08-14-2022, 11:44 AM   #5
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When encountering the unknown always use the toad to scout out the terrain first.
Take note of everything, including pull outs, turn arounds, shady looking characters etc...
Bring a couple lousy lawn chairs and a beat up cooler to "stake your claim", go get the coach and have your significant other lead the way in with the toad so if someone is coming out you can pull over in noted pull out and wait. Relying on some sort of app rarely has any advantages scouting out those good remote unpopulated campsites, yet apps like overlander will get you in the general areas.
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Old 08-14-2022, 04:21 PM   #6
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Where do you want to find boondocking spots? Any state in particular?

If you will be in a particular state a long time to justify buying the reference or if you'd return to that state often, you might want to consider the Benchmark Series of road atlas. We had one for each western state as that's where we traveled. It gives you a very large picture of the areas with many details such as public lands. We used the more heavily colored side roads as they are better for big RVs rather than the skinny-lined ones but we sometimes used them, also. Just depends on the area.

We also got recommendation from friends as they boondocked, also.

Even public campgrounds are cheaper than RV parks. We've used national parks, national forest campgrounds, BLM campgrounds, Corp of Engineer, county, city, fairgrounds, national wildlife refuges and even a fish hatchery or two. In the West some public utilities even have campgrounds.

Over the years I kept a list of places we've stayed or places we ruled out & it's up to 300 typed pages. No... it's not for sale!

Here's a YouTube on finding sites. They have a big bus among other 'toys' nowadays!



This couple traveled in a 40' motorhome and loved public sites. Here are some ideas if you get out West (where it's much easier to find sites).

https://www.wheelingit.us/category/b...docking-sites/

Here are reviews on their many public park/rv park stays. They were full-timers for many years and now live in France. Interesting couple and she does awesome blogs and reviews and is a terrific photographer. Use the Search function on their site to find info on different parks or areas.

https://www.wheelingit.us/category/rv-park-ratings/

Do a Google for 'Boondocking RVers' and many have their own YouTubes. Perhaps Search 'Boondocking RVers in ***** whatever state you're looking'

We full-timed 16 years and mostly used public parks or boondocked on public lands. Honestly, after we researched a road or area & found that it was suitable for our motorhome, once we got there we always succeeded in staying there. We only pre-scouted once on an narrow forest service road just to make sure there were places to pull over, if needed. The Jeep driver led the way with a pretty good distance ahead & we used two-way radios. The idea was to note pull-over spots & also if encountering another vehicle or RV to let them know the pull-over spots ahead & to give them a heads up on another RV coming along. As it turned out, we never met another vehicle so smooth sailing.

We would drive a good gravel road up to approx. 20 miles in to find our secluded spots; most often with a lake or stream in nearby proximity. Those are the kinds of spots we sought. We would then normally stay 10-14 days until our holding tanks held out. By then we liked to move on somewhere else & dump & refill water enroute.

There just isn't one place or app to look for these sites. It takes some work but oh, so worth it! Good luck!
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Old 08-15-2022, 09:30 AM   #7
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The real problem is that boondocking almost always requires pre-scouting, even if the sites look good on Google Earth, and even if someone says that the area is good for big rigs.

There are always unanticipated rocks, ditches, logs, sand, and mud. And conditions change from day to day.

So with our small trailer (which is less maneuverable than a Class A, although not as long), we always have to stop, park the trailer, and scout with our truck to make sure that the site is trailer-friendly.

So that is the real issue -- there is no substitute for "boots on the ground," as the Army says.

Which means that you have to build in a lot of extra time to survey the landscape. Boondocking is free, but not if you count the value of your time.

So there are times where we will choose to stay in an RV park, rather than spend a couple of hours looking for boondocking. This is especially true when we are trying to cover long distances.

We love boondocking -- it is our preferred mode of camping. And we boondock about 50 nights a year. But not every night.
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Old 08-15-2022, 04:57 PM   #8
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I have been boondocking in a class a for 9 years. About 100 days a year. It takes time to find spots, as others have said, explore with your toad. Here in the West we have tons of options. Florida might be the issue but don't give up.
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Old 08-15-2022, 05:58 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by profdan View Post

There are always unanticipated rocks, ditches, logs, sand, and mud. And conditions change from day to day.
I love reading of your boondocking adventures. However, one wouldn't think of ... or shouldn't think of taking a 40' motorhome to the places you do - little one-lanes.

We always stayed on good gravel roads wide enough where the sides of the RV wouldn't touch vegetation. We didn't have issues such as rocks, ditches, logs, sand and mud. A motorhome is too low to the ground to use those kinds of paths.
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Old 08-17-2022, 09:47 AM   #10
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We boondock most years 90 days or more in our 40’ Class A. We do it out west though in more open country. The desert is easy; fine a spot someone told you about, drive the toad to make sure the road is t washed out, then go. In the northern mountains, we prefer open sites because of our solar, so we don’t head to forested areas often. Again, we get a potential site identified through Campendium or friends, take a look at satellite images, then drive the toad in to check before being the RV. I have definitely driven one lane roads in the MH, but we send DH in the toad in front of me to check the way. I don’t mind leaves on the side of the rig, but I draw the line at branches that would leave scratches. And I have driven some rough roads! Key is to drive slowly, sometimes really slowly. Probably only worth it if we are staying 5-7 days though.
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Old 08-21-2022, 01:35 PM   #11
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If youre going to SoCal...google cougar buttes. It's an offroad riding area. However, that area is 180,000 acres and you can camp virtually anywhere on it. Like powerline road, Boone road, north Anderson dry lake.

You can stay 14 days on any BLM land. I've seen people stay 14 days, move 10 feet, stay 14 days, move back 10 feet. Rinse and repeat.
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Old 08-21-2022, 02:07 PM   #12
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Stop in at a district office for USFS or BLM. They will usually have good advice and a map. There are also conservation areas in some(most?) western states that allow boondocking though an annual or temporary permit may be required. We have permits for CO and AZ currently. MO does not require a permit.

Have a plan A, B, C, and at least D if going into an area that you don't know, and start with plan A early enough so you have time for the other plans.

We just ended 2.5 months on the road with a total outlay of $-0- for overnight camping. GA, MO, MN, SD, WY, CO, NM, TX, LA.
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Old 08-21-2022, 04:58 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigEvi View Post

You can stay 14 days on any BLM land. I've seen people stay 14 days, move 10 feet, stay 14 days, move back 10 feet. Rinse and repeat.
Just to clear up for noobies that 14 days move 10 feet, stay 14 days move back is not allowed on blm property. That is just poor practice but then they probably just dump their tanks anywhere...rules don't
apply to them. :(

https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/camping
Dispersed camping is generally allowed on public land for a period not to exceed 14 days within a 28 consecutive day period. Camping limitation rules vary per office, please check with your local office for details on camping limitations. In addition, campers must not leave any personal property unattended for more than 10 days (12 months in Alaska).
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Old 08-22-2022, 05:22 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Itinerant1 View Post
Just to clear up for noobies that 14 days move 10 feet, stay 14 days move back is not allowed on blm property. That is just poor practice but then they probably just dump their tanks anywhere...rules don't
apply to them. :(

https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/camping
Dispersed camping is generally allowed on public land for a period not to exceed 14 days within a 28 consecutive day period. Camping limitation rules vary per office, please check with your local office for details on camping limitations. In addition, campers must not leave any personal property unattended for more than 10 days (12 months in Alaska).
Don't believe the 28 day limitation applies in this area. Never seen or heard of a ranger enforcing it. I personally know several people that spend months on BLM land in the winter.

But if the keyboard warrior rule scares you...every 14 days go stay in a Wal-Mart parking lot for 1 night. Then go back to BLM land.

Oh and thanks for the insult about this type of person probably dumps their tanks wherever they want. Just because people like to live for free in the desert doesn't mean they're crude and leave toxic waste all over. I'm sure you follow every rule in the book.
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