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Larry & Rita 11-11-2012 01:01 PM

Heat Pump
 
How much actual heat should I be getting from the heat pump ??
I read the instructions but in real life what should I expect ??
Mine really is not effective and I was wondering what to expect.
2006 Holiday Rambler 40 foot.

Dutch Star Don 11-11-2012 01:18 PM

Larry.....The heat pumps work well, but you have to give them some time to warm uo the coach. Since heat rises and they're pumping heat out at the roof line, they take a while to warm up. Stand up after they've been runniing and you'll feel the heat difference.

Here's how we use ours. If it's not too cold, I run the REAR heat pump on a setting of of 75-78 with all the ducts closed in the bedroom. This forces the heat up front and keeps the noise in the rear of the coach, allowing us to watch TV without all of the noise. If it's really cold, I run both.

When we go to bed, I turn the front heat pump on to about 60-62 and the rear off. I open the bedroom vents so that we get a low volumn of heat in the bedroom. This makes the bedroom very comfortable without blowing direct heat on you. The heat from the front of the coach also migrates back. I hate when we have to run the propane heater because it's so irratic and blows heat directly onto us and dries out the room.

If the outside temps get down in the low thirties, the heat pumps will lose their effectiveness. Your system is also setup to turn your propane heater on if the heat pumps cna't keep up. The heat pump in Zone 1 has to be on for your propane heater to take ove.

jesilvas 11-11-2012 01:19 PM

Heat pumps more or less just provide "warmth" from my experience.

vsheetz 11-11-2012 01:26 PM

I don't have a heat pump in the MH, but I do have a heat pump PTAC unit (like often found in a hotel room mounted through the wall under the window) in our insulated 2 car converted garage / hobby room. It does a great job of heating the area.

RonaldNC 11-11-2012 03:34 PM

I really like my heat pumps and they work pretty well. We were camping in the Smokies last week, where it was getting into the 30's. While it wasn't as quick as the furnace in warming the coach up... it did really well. In the evening, when it got to the low 30's, it would kick over to the furnace.

Our technique, if we want to get comfortable fast, is to run the furnace for 15-20 minutes to knock the chill out... then switch over to the heat pumps to keep it comfortable.

No complaints here...

Ron

bluepill 11-11-2012 03:40 PM

The heat output temperature of a heat pump is a lot lower than an LP or oil fired furnace - somewhere around 140 vs over 300 degrees. The BTU output is usually lower also. That makes it feel cool in comparison.

Larry & Rita 11-11-2012 04:07 PM

I tried Dons idea about turning on the bedroon and closing the vents (made sense to me) but the heat pump would not come on-I tried three times and when I dialed up heat pump the furnace kept comming on.

georgetown350 11-11-2012 04:57 PM

Larry and Rita. The heat pump is useless when it gets to cold outside. They are good down to around 45 F or so. Sounds like your panel is calling for the furnace as it is to cold for the heat pump to operate.

jesilvas 11-11-2012 05:12 PM

Heat pumps are only around 5k BTU I think.

Mr_D 11-11-2012 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jesilvas (Post 1367578)
Heat pumps are only around 5k BTU I think.

Nope, same rating as the air con. The heat strips are only 5k BTU.

Larry: They do not give the same warm rush of heated air as does the furnace, the air temp is not much higher than body temp so the air doesn't feel really warm.
Have had heat pumps in the last two MH's and for over 20 years in the stick house.
They shut down when the air temps get around 40 or somewhat lower. In our Dutch Star they automatically switch to the furnace somewhere around that outside temp.

jesilvas 11-11-2012 05:28 PM

That makes sense. It's still the regular compressor, just in reverse.
It was the heat strip I was thinking of.

Larry & Rita 11-11-2012 05:45 PM

Makes sense !!
Thanks for all the info-I knew I could count on you all
Thanks again
Gotta go get a blanket

Denali 11-23-2012 03:45 PM

Heat pump output
 
We use our heat pumps 80-90% of the time that we need space heating, unless we are in an area with high electricity rates and are paying for our own power, such as the Escapees park in Coarsegold, CA, where we own a site.

In the ten years that we have been living in our coaches full time, we have found that the heat pumps work well down to around 35 degrees. The colder it is outside, the less warm the output of the heat pump, and, depending on the model, they go into a defrost cycle fairly often when it's below 40 degrees outside.

Our last coach had a propane furnace, and the system automatically switched from heat pump to furnace at some temperature (37 degrees, as I recall). Our current coach has an Aqua-Hot, and there is no automatic switchover. The heat pump will keep running down to at least 30 degrees ambient that I know of. Even at 30 degrees the front heat pump will produce enough heat for comfortable sleeping.

itdave 11-23-2012 05:58 PM

I would think that the heat pump effectiveness would be rated the same as AC which is output air temp is 20 degrees less than input are temp. So in heat pump mode I guess it would be output temp is 20 degrees more than input air temp.

Denali 11-23-2012 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itdave (Post 1379473)
I would think that the heat pump effectiveness would be rated the same as AC which is output air temp is 20 degrees less than input are temp. So in heat pump mode I guess it would be output temp is 20 degrees more than input air temp.

That's right.

Remember, the "input air temp" is the temperature of the room being heated, not the outside temperature. The heat pump (in either heating or cooling mode) does not draw outside air into the house.

frankdamp 11-26-2012 09:11 PM

Larry:

I can't pass on experience with RV heat pump systems, but when we were looking to move from our big house in Everett to something smaller, many of the places we looked at had heat pumps.

The main thing I noticed was that the output air was warm (maybe 15 degrees above the room air temp), rather than hot (which we were used to with a conventional furnace). I think the reaction tme needed to heat the environment to the temp you've asked for is a lot longer with a heat pump, but once it's close to the temp, the heat pump is a lot more efficient.

In the end we decided not to go for a house with a heat pump, mainly because Eileen didn't like what she sensed as "cold drafts", even though they were a few degrees warmer than the room ambient.

SteveSkinner 11-28-2012 02:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denali (Post 1379485)
That's right.

Remember, the "input air temp" is the temperature of the room being heated, not the outside temperature. The heat pump (in either heating or cooling mode) does not draw outside air into the house.

Not quite true
As above no air actually travels thru the unit but

The heat pump attempts to draw heat from the air outside and transfer it thru the heat exchanger to inside the unit. It becomes more difficult to extract heat as the temp drops and when it gets to some place above freezing it just gives up.
So turning on a heat pump in near freezing conditions will just chew electricity.
You will not get 20deg temp difference across the aircon as you would in cool mode.
Put it another way
When it's hot outside and you are in cool mode the unit is extracting heat from a hot motorhome and transferring thru the heat exchanger to the outside. There is generally a lot of heat available. In reverse there is very little heat available at 40f
There is no such thing as cold just a lack of heat
Would someone like to correct my analogy

Denali 11-28-2012 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveSkinner (Post 1383717)
Not quite true
As above no air actually travels thru the unit but

The heat pump attempts to draw heat from the air outside and transfer it thru the heat exchanger to inside the unit. It becomes more difficult to extract heat as the temp drops and when it gets to some place above freezing it just gives up.
So turning on a heat pump in near freezing conditions will just chew electricity.
You will not get 20deg temp difference across the aircon as you would in cool mode....

That why I said "The colder it is outside, the less warm the output of the heat pump".


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