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DGShaffer 10-16-2013 02:22 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by dunkonu23 (Post 1768865)
You sir, have a pair!

Scott


Anyone that flies a Fury Stratus in 3D does :D

sbleiweiss 10-17-2013 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DGShaffer (Post 1768868)
As long as you're not too cold then it's warm enough inside to keep things from freezing. Water has to be below 32 degrees for quite a bit for the cold to take hold and start freezing. Traveling south means that you'll only be in the coldest conditions for a day at the most.

If your planning on camping in sub freezing conditions then that's a whole different animal all together.

I'm not planning on overnighting in sub-freezing conditions, but one nver knows. Weather patterns can surprise you. Maybe not once you are truly in the South, but on the way there and back. And I'm not worried about inside the coach so much as in the basements. After all, all the water tanks are in basements, plus there are lines obviously to and from each of them also running through basements. Also, there are those Fall and Spring trips to a northern destination where the weather might turn ugly in a surprising way. For example, we are heading to Long Island the first week of November. An unusual cold wave early could catch us.Most RV Parks I tried to book at were going to be closed for the season already. That worries me some.

DGShaffer 10-17-2013 11:23 AM

It sounds like you might be safer to just winterize it as you travel and use water from a container until you're satisfied that the temps will remain out of freezing

dunkonu23 10-17-2013 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DGShaffer (Post 1768883)
Funny story from that trip. There was a little red car up about as far as what you see in the photo above. A gust of wind caught the powder in the pine trees to the right and I could see a dense cloud of snow crossing the highway. I knew what was going to happen so I started braking and soon I was in the cloud of snow with near zero visibility but I kept smoothly applying the brakes until I was at a full stop. When the snow cleared, there was that little red cart at a complete stop about ten feet in front of me!

Good judgement there! Some folks would have just plowed through. White outs are no fun!

Scott

dunkonu23 10-17-2013 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DGShaffer (Post 1768906)
Anyone that flies a Fury Stratus in 3D does :D

MA makes good helicopters. If you'd like we can take this to PM's so as to not derail your great thread! (I'm USA Flight Team Manager for ALeeS RC, Inc.)

Scott

DGShaffer 10-17-2013 07:27 PM

There's actually a RC thread on this site. It hasn't been active for a while but it's fun chatting it up abut the hobby.

I was fortunate to shake that RC Heli monkey a few years back. I was in pretty heavy and if I totaled up the money I had in it, I'd curl up under a table and cry! I even built a Hirobo Vertol which was a monster to fly!

I still have my Vario Bell 47-D and my Trex 450SE but haven't flown either of them in years.

I'm actually a rated rotary pilot but haven't flown those either in about two years with my last flight being in a 1957 Bell 47-D over here in Jersey.

Now it's all RV'ing and motorcycling which consumes all my time

dunkonu23 10-18-2013 11:49 AM

It is a very expensive hobby! :) Being a full scale pilot would be cool! I wish I had the time to learn. My wife would probably freak out, though!

PM me about the classic RC Helicopters you have. :)

Scott

Thortogo 10-26-2013 06:42 PM

6th photo down...what is that mounted on cabinet beside bed?

sbleiweiss 10-27-2013 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DGShaffer (Post 1770062)
It sounds like you might be safer to just winterize it as you travel and use water from a container until you're satisfied that the temps will remain out of freezing

We would be, but my wife thinks its gross to have antifreeze in our potable water lines, etc. So we rent a space in a heated building, and will have to pick and choose when and where to travel in late Fall, Winter and early Spring. That is why I have been asking the questions that I have; because I am trying to get a handle on how cold (and for how long) the MH can tolerate, unwinterized, how well the furnace heats the basements, any tricks for making this more doable, etc.

So I bought an indoor/outdoor thermometer so that I can have a good feel (while traveling) for the outdoor temperature. I am actually wondering whether to put the outdoor transmitter into the water tank basement instead of truly outside. My thinking is that it is the temperature in that (and maybe other) basement that I really care about.

I am also thinking that maybe it will be wise to keep the galley slide in when the outside temperature dips below freezing, and maybe keeping cabinet doors under the kitchen and bathroom sinks, and to the W/D open when it is below freezing outside.

camaromance 10-27-2013 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sbleiweiss (Post 1782643)
We would be, but my wife thinks its gross to have antifreeze in our potable water lines, etc. So we rent a space in a heated building, and will have to pick and choose when and where to travel in late Fall, Winter and early Spring. That is why I have been asking the questions that I have; because I am trying to get a handle on how cold (and for how long) the MH can tolerate, unwinterized, how well the furnace heats the basements, any tricks for making this more doable, etc. So I bought an indoor/outdoor thermometer so that I can have a good feel (while traveling) for the outdoor temperature. I am actually wondering whether to put the outdoor transmitter into the water tank basement instead of truly outside. My thinking is that it is the temperature in that (and maybe other) basement that I really care about. I am also thinking that maybe it will be wise to keep the galley slide in when the outside temperature dips below freezing, and maybe keeping cabinet doors under the kitchen and bathroom sinks, and to the W/D open when it is below freezing outside.

My dealer told me that you have to have continuous sub freezing weather for three days before water lines freeze up. I've camped and traveled several times in cold weather and never had a problem with lines freezing. The furnace does a really good job when your parked and engine heat will keep you safe when driving. Your water tank will be safe. If you're particularly concerned, place the outside thermometer in the plumbing compartment. There are a lot of exposed hoses behind the panel. You might also consider bypassing the built in water filter. Once bypassed, unscrew, drain, and remove the filter. I did a trip in northern PA in December a couple of years ago. It was very cold, sub freezing for the week I was parked. I placed my outside temp sensor in the plumbing compartment and found that if I left the compartment lights on, I generated enough heat to keep the compartment above freezing. It was in the low teens and the compartment never got below 40 degrees. Of course, I had the furnace going, too. The only real effect we experienced was the hot water didn't last as long. You can run the water heater on both electric and gas to help with this. Good luck.

Thortogo 10-27-2013 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thortogo (Post 1781941)
6th photo down...what is that mounted on cabinet beside bed?

I should have read on where you said you added the vacuum!

Thortogo 10-27-2013 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sbleiweiss (Post 1782643)
We would be, but my wife thinks its gross to have antifreeze in our potable water lines, etc. So we rent a space in a heated building, and will have to pick and choose when and where to travel in late Fall, Winter and early Spring. That is why I have been asking the questions that I have; because I am trying to get a handle on how cold (and for how long) the MH can tolerate, unwinterized, how well the furnace heats the basements, any tricks for making this more doable, etc. So I bought an indoor/outdoor thermometer so that I can have a good feel (while traveling) for the outdoor temperature. I am actually wondering whether to put the outdoor transmitter into the water tank basement instead of truly outside. My thinking is that it is the temperature in that (and maybe other) basement that I really care about. I am also thinking that maybe it will be wise to keep the galley slide in when the outside temperature dips below freezing, and maybe keeping cabinet doors under the kitchen and bathroom sinks, and to the W/D open when it is below freezing outside.

We always keep all slides in when it gets very cold and fortunately always have plenty of move around room in our challenger. Also opening some of the cabinets too.

DGShaffer 10-27-2013 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by camaromance (Post 1782708)
My dealer told me that you have to have continuous sub freezing weather for three days before water lines freeze up. I've camped and traveled several times in cold weather and never had a problem with lines freezing. The furnace does a really good job when your parked and engine heat will keep you safe when driving. Your water tank will be safe. If you're particularly concerned, place the outside thermometer in the plumbing compartment. There are a lot of exposed hoses behind the panel. You might also consider bypassing the built in water filter. Once bypassed, unscrew, drain, and remove the filter. I did a trip in northern PA in December a couple of years ago. It was very cold, sub freezing for the week I was parked. I placed my outside temp sensor in the plumbing compartment and found that if I left the compartment lights on, I generated enough heat to keep the compartment above freezing. It was in the low teens and the compartment never got below 40 degrees. Of course, I had the furnace going, too. The only real effect we experienced was the hot water didn't last as long. You can run the water heater on both electric and gas to help with this. Good luck.

Thank you! :thumb:

DGShaffer 10-27-2013 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thortogo (Post 1782721)
I should have read on where you said you added the vacuum!

I wasn't quite sure what or who you were referring to here. I bought one of those Dyson rechargeable vacuums and carry it in between the house and motor home. I just ordered a second cradle to keep it charged. Those things are pretty amazing and really work well. Their light weight keeps them from damaging anything when they're being pushed around.


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