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-   -   Not stuck in Death Valley -- Blown engine! (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f22/not-stuck-in-death-valley-blown-engine-26120.html)

bruceh 11-12-2007 08:24 PM

Got towed to Pahrump. Technician tells me that I have a spun bearing and need ane new engine. Ugh, big bucks.

Checked with another tech at a different dealership and he concurred.

This is a real disapointment. I only have 37,000 miles on this and have been diligent with oil changes.

bruceh 11-12-2007 08:24 PM

Got towed to Pahrump. Technician tells me that I have a spun bearing and need ane new engine. Ugh, big bucks.

Checked with another tech at a different dealership and he concurred.

This is a real disapointment. I only have 37,000 miles on this and have been diligent with oil changes.

rgrstndgby 11-13-2007 04:10 AM

Bruceh..
Im really sorry to hear this, a major $$ hit for sure. .Did the tech say, "Rod, Main or Cam bearing ? I know there was some early thought that the trouble was in the valve train. If you dont mind, I'd like to know what your "running", and "idle" oil pressure was on "cold restart" after the damage was done... These 8.1's dont carry alot of OP even when new, and I'd be interested to know what yours was after the damage.. Thanks...rgr...

Argosy 11-13-2007 05:46 AM

Serious detonation (from the original thread) is extremely hard on an engine. It will blow the tops out of the pistons, beat the bearings out of the rods.

Once you loose a bearing oil pressure is very low, the clearance is so great it is hard to build pressure.

rgrstndgby 11-13-2007 07:54 AM

Argosy says...<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Once you loose a bearing oil pressure is very low, the clearance is so great it is hard to build pressure. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Once you loose a bearing oil pressure is very low, the clearance is so great it is hard to build pressure. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
.......................................

Thats generaly true...however, just spinning a bearing (and we dont know just what was spun)usually shuts off the oil supply to that journal, and if its not run much, it may not show much of a drop.. I'm sure there wont be much of an "autopsy" done, but I wonder where the knock sensor was in all this, and what caused the detonation in the first place.. and why didnt the knock sensor handle it?. If it was something coming apart, piston crown/land etc., that would be beyond the parameters of the sensor. There are alot of factors involved in engine failure, and its not possible to make a definitive statement as to "What Happened" without knowing more...rgr...

edgray 11-13-2007 08:10 AM

I realize that probably not "enough" is known about this particular situation, but I'd like to know from some of you knowledgable members if a spun bearing AUTOMATICALLY requires a complete engine replacement?? Can't these brutes be repaired anymore? Can you tell I don't know, especially since I can't even phrase the question properly? https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo...icon_frown.gif ED

Ultra RV Products 11-13-2007 08:26 AM

Just a thought but do you have a service contract???

Rocky 2 11-13-2007 09:17 AM

37,000 miles. Bummer. A friend of mine had 36,100 miles on his 4 year old W22 when the same thing happened. Fortunately for him, he had a service contract that picked up the cost. He just had to get towed twice. His towing insurance picked up the first tow but he had to pay the second to the repair facility in Minot, ND. Stuck there for three weeks.

rgrstndgby 11-13-2007 09:54 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Can't these brutes be repaired anymore? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
ED, your question is perfectly phrased.
Im lookimng for an "embarassed modesty" icon, but failing I'll rant on...
Theoretically , yes they can, in fact places like Jaspers, etc. that make a huge business selling rebuilt engines require (usable)cores to be returned to rebuild. These places are like factorys tho, the days when some dude in greasy coveralls, engine swinging from a chain in a tree, pieces spread out on his wifeys card table, are pretty much gone. (been there, done that)..From a practical standpoint tho, by the time an RV owner gets someone to R&R the engine, strip all the acessories, dissasemble the engine, (the parts we are talking about, the bearings, are at the "deepest" part of the engine), and find a competent machinest to do the machine work,then re assemble and reinstall it all, BIG bucks are involved.. If its the rod bearing thats spun, the rod, bearing, and crankshaft must be replaced. If its a Main bearing, or cam bearing, then add the engine block to the list. Most Mechs. will want to replace about everything inside to make their responsibility a little more brearable, and the cost goes thru the roof. We will expect him to Guarantee the job, so he isn't likely to take any chances on slightly worn parts, so a "new " engine is the result..Im still thinking that some event" led up to this failure. Rather than a ping, I wonder if it was a knock, indicating that a piece had found its way from perhaps a piston, or valve, and produced the sound. No room for "strangers" in there, and anything roaming around will quickly bring failure...rgr...

edgray 11-13-2007 12:43 PM

rgrstndgby: Thanks for your reply. I understand a little better now. Part of my question was due to the thought that removing the entire engine from a typical Class A MH can't be too easy, and I "assumed" it would be easier to drop the bottom off the block and replace the crank, rods & bearings, and pistons from underneath.

Now I'm sure you understand just how little I know! https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo...on_redface.gif ED

Argosy 11-13-2007 04:01 PM

Depending on the amount you want to spend and how well you trust the machine shop it really isn't necessary to replace cranks, rods and blocks unless there is extensive damage. If I had to replace a crank and block, I would replace the engine.

Rod caps and main bearing caps are accessed by pulling the oil pan, once it is off they are about all you will see.

Cranks can be turned to standard undersizes. They can also be welded and turned. Rods can be resized. Generally a block is reuseable with an align bore if it hasn't had a rod break loose. Cylinders can be sleeved. Sleeving and welding cranks would not be economically feasible for all cylinders/crank journals unless it was an exotic or rare engine, but for a single cylinder it is a lot cheaper than replacing the part.

rgrstndgby 11-13-2007 05:31 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Cranks can be turned to standard undersizes. They can also be welded and turned. Rods can be resized. Generally a block is reuseable with an align bore if it hasn't had a rod break loose. Cylinders can be sleeved. Sleeving and welding cranks would not be economically feasible for all cylinders/crank journals unless it was an exotic or rare engine, but for a single cylinder it is a lot cheaper than replacing the part. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


this is all true, However, IMHO, these things have no place in an engine that gets run like a MoHo engine does. Also, considering the labor $$ involved in R&R the engine, Its just not worth the compromized result..back in the day, I've bored/sleeved blocks and ground cranks [IMG]in the chassis[/IMG], but thankfully, those days are long gone. I'd have no problem with a QUALITY independant, or factory rebuild in a MoHo, but a welded crank,or sleeved block, no way...rgr....

FreshAir 11-13-2007 05:56 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by edgray:
rgrstndgby: Part of my question was due to the thought that removing the entire engine from a typical Class A MH can't be too easy, and I "assumed" it would be easier to drop the bottom off the block and replace the crank, rods & bearings, and pistons from underneath.

ED </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ed, interesting thought on removing thr 8.1. I was at the WH dealer in north Salt Lake City last year when they were removing an 8.1 from a class A. They raised the coach up on a lift and then had a fork lift with a home made cradle that fit the motor lower it from the bottom. The service manager said it was no big deal, easier than some car's and truck's and they do them, 8.1 MH, often.
Well, that worried me as there were old 8.1's on pallets all over the place. I asked the service manager what were they going to do with the old engines and he said just use them for salvage as Work Horse doesn't want any of them back. I thought, "Oh Man!" wish I hadn't seen this 8.1 salvage yard. Is this signs of things to come?

Maybe Brazels could add a little light on what's involved in the exchange of an 8.1 on the Work Horse chassis and are they doing a lot of them?
Pat

NeilV 11-13-2007 05:58 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by edgray:
I realize that probably not "enough" is known about this particular situation, but I'd like to know from some of you knowledgable members if a spun bearing AUTOMATICALLY requires a complete engine replacement?? Can't these brutes be repaired anymore? Can you tell I don't know, especially since I can't even phrase the question properly? https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo...icon_frown.gif ED </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

If the engine was immediatly shut down then maybe it could be repaired. However this one was pushed for some time pulling up a hill so the chances are slim.

KayLarGo 11-13-2007 06:24 PM

bruceh --- so sorry to here of your problems. We also have a workhorse and are in Pahrump to day and for two more nights as it stands. We are at Terribles Lakeside resort. We went to Death Vally today with our friends here that gave us a tour. Noticed the cell service there. If we can help let me know.

Larry

bruceh 11-13-2007 07:53 PM

Now that I am home, I have speedy internet. I drove home since the closest crate engine was in Michigan and there was 5 day delivery. That bumps into Thanksgiving and I didn't want to hurry anybody.

One question was about my oil pressure. I never saw any change even after limping into the dealership (from the tow truck). As I recall, it was 40+ cold.

There was a lot of discussion on rebuild/replace. One of the things that sold me on replace was the fact that I would roll out of there with a 5 year/100K warranty good all over the country. The rebuild carried a 1 year/12K warranty. Had I gone to some local shop, they might have done an acceptable bandaid, or maybe not. With the places that I go with this MoHo, I don't want to be sweating everytime I go remote.

I was quoted 39 hours of labor to R&R the engine. That is a big bite all by itself a $90/hr. and I saw no real future in skimping on the part going in.

According to the techs that I talked to, this not an uncommon poblem with the 8.1. My faith in Workhorse and the GM 8.1 has taken a beating.

When I first heard the pinging on the hill, I shut down about 2 seconds after saying bad words. The pinging might have snuck up on me but with all of the fans going I wouldn't have heard it until it got bad.

Thanks for the discussion and offers of assistance.

Jeff H 11-13-2007 08:07 PM

You drove from Pahrump to Coarsegold? What did it sound like in all those miles?
Are you sure you don't have burnt plug wires?

bruceh 11-13-2007 08:25 PM

Sorry, I should have been more explicit. The motor home is in Pahrump but the Jeep, my wife and I are in Corsegold.

Bucky1 11-14-2007 03:27 AM

Just a note on rebuilding. If a bearing is spun,the engine comes out. You can get to the bearing, and could even replace it, but the crank will have some major grooves, and will need to be resized. You can't get the crank out easily (not sure about 8.1's) without popping out the pistons, which should be checked anyhow. Plenty of shavings went through the oils system, and the engine needs to be gone through. That said, if repaired, it is good to go. All my bearings in my race motor are undersized, and they are just dandy at 8,000 rpm pass after pass. However, it may be less expensive to go rebuilt. That would not suprise me. And the warranty will be better too.

Bob (WA0MQE) 11-14-2007 05:22 AM

So "bruceh"... did you get a price on a new crate engine? I'll bet that's going to set you back a bit.

bruceh 11-14-2007 07:39 AM

Yes! The pain for the crate engine is $6100. If someone can provide a sanity check on this number, I would appreciate it.

Being broken down 400 miles from home, my options were severely limited. On reflection, I probably would have done the same thing even if I were home.

Photog 11-14-2007 08:09 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by bruceh:
Yes! The pain for the crate engine is $6100. If someone can provide a sanity check on this number, I would appreciate it.

Being broken down 400 miles from home, my options were severely limited. On reflection, I probably would have done the same thing even if I were home. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I found a website with a re-manufactured 8.1 at $4,995. I guess $1,100 more for a new one isn't all that bad.

JCM 11-14-2007 05:23 PM

I was quoted about $6,000 this spring when my oil pump shaft sheared = no oil pressure. I was lucky that the motor wasn't under a heavy load and I turned it off right away. I was able to just change the shaft. I did check around for a new engine while I was awating the final "diagnosis".
I know that hill and nearly toasted a F450 in a 30' "C" class in 2001. It was smelling hot when we reached the top and the brakes were smelling hot when we got down the other side into Death Valley. That night as we lay awake under the stars - my wife asked me if it would have been better if we had disconnected the toad and drove it up and down the hill on its own -- duh!.
Let us know the final cost when all is done. Good luck.

DonavonP 11-14-2007 07:14 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JCM:
disconnected the toad and drove it up and down the hill on its own .
L </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is what we do.

Argosy 11-15-2007 02:14 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I'd have no problem with a QUALITY independant, or factory rebuild in a MoHo, but a welded crank,or sleeved block, no way...rgr.... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

As this is a relatively new motor home I agree, a factory long block will give a better resale value and be an easier sale when the time comes. But it is the perception of the repair that is the problem, not the actual repair.

Welding journals, resleeving blocks is commonly done to repair engines, including engines in medium duty trucks, which work as hard as motor home engines, and do it daily to make money. Done correctly these are repairs that will last as long as the rest of the engine.

These are also one step past the normal repair of turning the crank to a standard undersize, boring the block to a standard oversize. Engines with these repairs usually are going in for the second rebuild or were not shut down when a problem was first noticed and more than normal damage was done.

The point I wanted to make was it is not necessary to purchase expensive parts like crankshafts because a rod bearing spun, or a block and crank because a main spun. It is normal to grind crank journals, bore blocks, saving a lot of money over buying new, and still end up with an engine that will have acceptable performance and life.

Max Hubrich 11-15-2007 03:36 AM

I just read back to the original thread---

This all happened 2000 miles after switching to synthetic oil! WOW--What are your plans for the new engine?

dieselclacker 11-15-2007 05:42 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
I just read back to the original thread---

This all happened 2000 miles after switching to synthetic oil! WOW--What are your plans for the new engine? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think the problem isn't the type of engine lubricant used in the motorhome, the problem was going up Towne Pass towing a Jeep. That pass is a real killer in warm weather. Donavan has the right idea, unhook the toad and drive it over. This is, providing, of course, there was sufficient amount of lubricant in the engine. https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo...icon_smile.gif

Dieselclacker

Tom N 11-15-2007 06:27 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by bruceh:
Got towed to Pahrump. Technician tells me that I have a spun bearing and need ane new engine. Ugh, big bucks. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Have you had any mods done to your engine such as reprogramming the ECM??

-Tom

bruceh 11-15-2007 08:23 AM

The engine is completely stock, absolutely no mods at all. The oil level was in the normal range as was the oil pressure (before, during and after destruction). The water warmed up to mid range but never overheated.

I don't know what to do about the oil in the future. It doesn't make sense to me that the oil had anything to do with the problem but there is this unnerving coincidence.

I drove the motor home up Towne pass towing the Jeep in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 with no problems. I wasn't going very fast at the summit but the engine didn't self-destruct. My old motor home with the Ford 460 did the grade in 1998, 1999, 2000 and 2001 with no problems but pulling a lighter toad.

I realize that I will need to do something different in the future. I guess that I had too much confidence in my engine.

I could go the long way around but I really like driving across the desert and, yes, I like Death Valley a lot. We go every November for the 49er encampment. I suppose that in the future, I will use the interstate.

The point is being made that a rebuild can be quite acceptable. I realize this and had I been home, I would have put more effort into researching this. The economics are still that the engine would have to come out and a lot of labor would have to go into the rebuild along with some parts. Being in Pahrump with zero local knowledge, I opted for the new engine. I might have made the same decision if I were home but that wasn't an option (not without a very expensive tow).

Speaking of towing, we have AAA+ which covers the first $200 of an RV tow and Foremost Insurance which will cover $250. The next $350 is on me.

DonavonP 11-15-2007 09:01 AM

Bruce, I think you're smart getting a new engine instead of a rebuild.

Hope you get back on the road with no more problems.

Max Hubrich 11-15-2007 09:37 AM

Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil----

NeilV 11-15-2007 03:09 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.

This is a common side effect of doing an engine flush when one has waited too long and ends up doing more harm than good.

dieselclacker 11-15-2007 03:44 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.

This is a common side effect of doing an engine flush when one has waited too long and ends up doing more harm than good. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Neil, what do you use to "flush" an engine?

Dieselclacker

NeilV 11-15-2007 06:25 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by dieselclacker:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.

This is a common side effect of doing an engine flush when one has waited too long and ends up doing more harm than good. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Neil, what do you use to "flush" an engine?

Dieselclacker </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I usually change the oil regularly enough and with good oil so that I don't have need to. In the old days we would use range oil or kerosene however there are specialty products out there now for this purpose. In the case of replacing a blown head gasket with moderate water intrusion into the oil pan or a long overdue oil change, some 5-20 motor oil and a new filter, run it for ten minutes or so and then immediatly change it again.

On an engine with some years on it I would remove the valve covers and oil pan, scrape them clean then put them in a parts washer to finish the job. Pull the pickup off the oil pump and clean it in the parts washer too. Now inspect the buildup on the heads and block and consider whether it needs to be soaked in a tank or to be stripped down and cleaned.

Bottom line I avoid engine oil flushes and will only use them as a last resort when I really don't care so there is not any one that I prefer or would reccomend.

Tom N 11-16-2007 08:39 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It has always been my understanding that synthetic oil had less detergents/additives than dino oil, because less were needed.

-Tom

Tom N 11-16-2007 08:58 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Pennzoil hasn't been good 'ole Pennzoil in about 25 years. At one time Pennzoil was made from the best crude in the world, 100% Pennsylvania paraffin based crude oil. But, after Pennzoil was sold in the 1970's they have used asphalt based crude. Ditto for Quaker State, Wolf's Head and a few others.

The only 100% PA paraffin based oil made today is made in PA by the American Refining Group's Bradford, PA refinery and marketed under the brand name of Brad Penn.

See: https://www.amref.com/

-Tom

FrontRangeRVer 11-16-2007 06:39 PM

Tom is right...and I will add, there is no way that Synthetic oil had anything to do with the engine damage or bearing damage.

Lukeaa 11-16-2007 07:44 PM

I am coming into this discussion late, but in July I lost a head gasket on my 05 Admiral at 17,500 miles. It overheated on a grade, and WH said we are putting in a new engine. Five weeks later, I had a new engine that is running perfectly. August is a bad time to get an engine put in, because all of the shops are backed up. However, WH was great and I am a happy customer. They just wanted to see three invoices for oil changes. New engine for zero cost.

max49 11-16-2007 08:31 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Lukeaa: They just wanted to see three invoices for oil changes. New engine for zero cost. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I change my own oil so I have 'no invoices'. Could they deny a warranty claim because I don't have receipts for the oil & filter?

I always thought the engine should easily out last the rest of the MH. Now I'm hearing about all these blown 8.1's. Is it a good reliable engine or not?

NeilV 11-17-2007 02:45 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tom N:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It has always been my understanding that synthetic oil had less detergents/additives than dino oil, because less were needed.

-Tom </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may have to have less added due to its nature but it does a really good job of penetrating on its own.

I lost the bearings on a Turbocharged engine that went all its life on dino without problems until we changed it over too late in its life to synthetic. Caught it right away before spinning or grinding anything up and was able to just polish the mains and crank pins and then replace the bearing inserts. Had to clean the sludge but no metal shavings out of the oil galleries also as they were now plugged. The diagnosis was that the synthetic dislodged enough oil that had been cooked by the turbo that it caused the bypass on the oil filter to open and plug things up further down the line. We also replaced the oil pump and pickup/strainer while we were at it.

One more reason to be faithfull on oil changes always using high quality oil and filters. I do use synthetic but make the switch sooner rather than later.

edgray 11-17-2007 05:56 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I change my own oil so I have 'no invoices'. Could they deny a warranty claim because I don't have receipts for the oil & filter? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
MAX49: IF you don't have a receipt from a "shop" for the required services, and you also don't have a receipt to prove when you bought the oil and filter to do the service yourself, then you are "probably" not in a position to "prove" that required service has been completed on ANY type of schedule. What would you expect GM to do, just take your "word" for it? Good luck with that! ED

JCM 11-17-2007 07:44 AM

Keep a log book of all services, modifications etc. It will help your memory and be informative to the 2nd owner or can be used for warentee claims.

Photog 11-17-2007 10:27 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JCM:
Keep a log book of all services, modifications etc. It will help your memory and be informative to the 2nd owner or can be used for warentee claims. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I agree. I also keep a manila folder in the coach with copies of all repair and service invoices, as well as, the register receipts for oil and filters I buy.

BellaBo 11-17-2007 06:04 PM

I had the exact same thing happen to my 1984 454 that bruceh had happen. Collapsed piston though. Known problem with these motors. In fact when I called the extended warranty people they said, " let me guess #5 piston? it's the third one I've had today"

Even with that known problem, I had to dig out 5 years worth of receipts to prove it was serviced properly.

They covered the $6000 new engine except for some coolant, oil, filters and minor other stuff.

They put a 4 bolt main engine in. Apparently, the older 454's were 3 bolt main engines. Anyway, it ran way stronger and seem to have more torque than the old one.

The new engine vs rebuilt helped sell that coach faster and for higher $$.

Can't stress enough, keep every receipt for everything, period!

max49 11-17-2007 09:56 PM

I always change my own oil and don't have the organization skill to keep oil recepts. Have never needed them in 58 years. But since I have a WH now, I guess maybe I should.
My logbook sticks to the door jam, telling me when and mileage of last oil change and the 'due' again mileage. The old sticker gets trashed when the new one goes on.
I don't remember reading in the warranty section, that we have to keep receipts for the oil we buy, is it in there? If I show receipts for 5 or 10 qts of oil between changes, will they rebuild the engine if I tell them it burnt all that oil. I mean, if receipts prove I changed the oil, then why else would I buy all that oil? To put in my other vehicles?

rgrstndgby 11-18-2007 04:36 AM

Argosy said...<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The point I wanted to make was it is not necessary to purchase expensive parts like crankshafts because a rod bearing spun, or a block and crank because a main spun. It is normal to grind crank journals, bore blocks, saving a lot of money over buying new, and still end up with an engine that will have acceptable performance and life. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

These are certainly valid and informed points, and I don't question them in the least, but IMO, repairs made in a fleet, or fleet like environment call for different parameters in deciding New/Rebuilt, than if the vehicle (MoHo)is someones "home". A failure in a MoHo, usually puts an entire family "on the curb", far from home and familiar repair facilities, with VERY little support. After the repair, they will drive away, maybe forever from the shop that holds the Warranty on the work. 2 scenerios,

#1, engine blows, towed to Joe's garage in Flotsam Az. Joe quotes, New Factory Motor, $5000, labor $5000..$10K total, NATIONWIDE warranty on motor, EVERYTHING NEW...(and if that one fails in warranty, then maybe, just maybe, some leverage on r&r too).

Scene #2, Joe says, I can get a welded crank, warranteed for 3/36000, new rod, piston, rings and bearings in 1 hole, same $5000 to r&r, but save you $2500..Lets do that, you say, saved a cool $2500.. 2 years and 14000 miles later you have it happen again (why did it happen in the first place, is there still something wrong in the original motor?) This time instead of being in Flotsam, you are in Muscatel, NY. Towed in to Genos, he says, "Joes, in Flotsam Az, never heard of him". Call to Joes produces the info, "oh yea, I remember you, crank is still in warranty, just call Mikes Cranks, in Baton Rouge,the company I bought the welded crankshaft from, send them the old one, and they will send you a new one". Geno says, $5000 r&r, $1000 labor, (if new failure didn't do any additional damage).Can you even imagine all the hassle this is going to be?..To keep this a "Short Story" instead of a Book, I will still say, that for Me, in MY MoHo, it's a NEW one, no sleeves, no welds, FACTORY warranty....rgr...

LeeB 11-18-2007 06:07 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">rgrstndgby </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
You said a mouth full and I agree 100%... It also apply's to many things in life sometimes saving a few bucks up front is not worth it in the end... Not to mention the peace of mind knowing that you have a Brand New Motor and the warranty to go along with it.

FrontRangeRVer 11-18-2007 05:21 PM

Max49's wife should be Wife of the Year! https://irv2.infopop.cc/images/sign0013.gif

max49 11-18-2007 07:51 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by FrontRangeRVer:
Max49's wife should be Wife of the Year! https://irv2.infopop.cc/images/sign0013.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
huh?

TandW 11-18-2007 08:25 PM

Re: motor flushes. Are you still burning out your breather pipe on the ground with a little bit of gas? How 'bout pouring some water down the carb to get the carbon out? When I was young we'd see "spun rod bearings" as a result of doing "hole shots". Abuse. Pure and simple. One day the ECM will record "black box" information and you won't have to worry about collecting repair/service receipts. Just can't sleep right now!!

FrontRangeRVer 11-18-2007 08:29 PM

Just kidding with you Max...drive it and dont worry about it. https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo.../icon_cool.gif

dieselclacker 11-19-2007 06:18 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by T&W:
Re: motor flushes. Are you still burning out your breather pipe on the ground with a little bit of gas? How 'bout pouring some water down the carb to get the carbon out? When I was young we'd see "spun rod bearings" as a result of doing "hole shots". Abuse. Pure and simple. One day the ECM will record "black box" information and you won't have to worry about collecting repair/service receipts. Just can't sleep right now!! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Your telling your age Chief!! https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo.../icon_razz.gif

Dieselclacker

NeilV 11-19-2007 10:49 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by dieselclacker:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by T&W:
Re: motor flushes. Are you still burning out your breather pipe on the ground with a little bit of gas? How 'bout pouring some water down the carb to get the carbon out? When I was young we'd see "spun rod bearings" as a result of doing "hole shots". Abuse. Pure and simple. One day the ECM will record "black box" information and you won't have to worry about collecting repair/service receipts. Just can't sleep right now!! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Your telling your age Chief!! https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo.../icon_razz.gif

Dieselclacker </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

How about when we had to add kerosene to our transmissions and differentials in the winter.

Don't pour water anymore got one of those new style Gumout Kits that you hang from the hood that slowly empties a pint of Gumout down your intake for you. Still have one in the original wrapper.

Argosy 11-20-2007 03:47 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Scene #2, Joe says, I can get a welded crank, warranteed for 3/36000, new rod, piston, rings and bearings in 1 hole, </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Certainly you jest. I can't imagine a reputable shop would even agree to do that and STILL give a warranty. Do you know how much garbage has gone thru the oil system by the time an engine lets go? I am talking about a reputable rebuild, not some hack who will do anything to make a buck. And any owner who agrees/insists on such a rebuild deserves to learn an expensive lesson; be informed or listen to the people who are.

rgrstndgby 11-20-2007 04:11 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">be informed or listen to the people who are. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
No Argosy, no "jesting", however it appears that you are taking this conversation as a personal criticism.. Not so, my post was only to illustrate what a variety of situations one might incur. If, as you imply, you are "informed", then Im sure you have seen the variety of work performed, from "NASCAR" level work, to "Shade Tree", in the name of auto repair. Though I no longer do anything "Auto", beyond routine maintanance, my experience in automotive work, including engine rebuilding, goes back about 60 years, to the days when Fords came from the factory with sleeves, and Chrysler delivered new cars with 1 or more undersized rod/main/cam bearings, and 1 or more oversized bores.
I also don't think any customer "deserves" to be taken advantage of. If you will re read my last post, a "compilation" of what could be encountered, you will see that I was saying that the "crankshaft" was warranteed, not the repair job.. Please feel free to disagree, but I have nothing further that will add "help" to this subject...rgr..

DriVer 11-20-2007 07:59 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Argosy:
.. be informed or listen to the people who are. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Argosy, I believe the "RGR" responded adequately in this matter and that between the both of us he's probably forgotten more than we might ever learn. https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo.../icon_wink.gif

I know RGR is not idly responding and I value his opinion.

rgrstndgby 11-20-2007 12:59 PM

Driver said... Argosy, I believe the "RGR" responded adequately in this matter and that between the both of us he's probably forgotten more than we might ever learn.[/QUOTE]


Well, my wife thinks I've forgotten more than I ever knew...rgr... https://irv2.infopop.cc/images/aeh.gif

Argosy 11-20-2007 07:15 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by rgrstndgby:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">be informed or listen to the people who are. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
No Argosy, no "jesting", however it appears that you are taking this conversation as a personal criticism.. Not so, my post was only to illustrate what a variety of situations one might incur. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

From what I have read so far I'm not even close to taking this personally. I believe forums such as this should be a free exchange of accurate information. My intent was not to tell you to listen to me, reread the complete sentence:

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">And any owner who agrees/insists on such a rebuild deserves to learn an expensive lesson; be informed or listen to the people who are. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

My intent was towards the owner, he needs to be informed when making repair decisions.

I continue to stress a reputable shop when I make my posts. To bring hack repairs such as you referenced is not reputable work and should not be considered, I will definitely give you that. But it doesn't help to continually muddy the waters with these worst case scenarios, think reputable, warranted (of the complete engine) rebuild.

A properly rebuilt engine is no more apt to fail than a new engine. Six months from now if the owner of an older motor home finds this thread while looking for information about a replacement engine I believe he deserves to know there are acceptable options other than a new long block, or replacing the block and crank because a main spun. That is not normal practice in the industry and unnecessarily makes repair costs prohibitive on older units. And again, don't forums really exist to exchange accurate information?

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DriVer:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Argosy:
.. be informed or listen to the people who are. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Argosy, I believe the "RGR" responded adequately in this matter and that between the both of us he's probably forgotten more than we might ever learn. https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo.../icon_wink.gif

I know RGR is not idly responding and I value his opinion. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't question RGR's experience. But I also do not post on subjects I do not know. While his opinion might be good, it is not the only acceptable repair. You can "what if" any repair into a nightmare. If he would read in my posts where I continually stress "reputable" all this would not have been necessary.

DriVer 11-20-2007 07:48 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Argosy: </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Good! https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo...on_biggrin.gif Let's move on ..... have a nice holiday Argosy.

Steady Eddie 11-25-2007 07:50 AM

Good Morning---

You guys all missed it...the lifeblood of any BB Chevy is it's
oil pressure..it was mentioned that he only carried 40 PSI of
oil pressure BEFORE it grenaded...I carry 75 PSI going down the road
and 45 PSI at hot idle...*IF* he was "on the grade"--towing heavy--
his knock sensor circuit should have saved the motor. Just finished
a 3000 mile round trip with our Newmar 3357, towing a 4K# Jeep, over
the So. Oregon Mtns. and over the Pass out of Bakersfield, Ca. with
no overheating and no loss of oil pressure, both ways from Phoenix, Az.

edgray 11-25-2007 08:21 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">the lifeblood of any BB Chevy is it's
oil pressure. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
SE: yes, your statement is correct, however the highway speed OP in the 8.1 L motor is more likely to be 40-45 psi and only around 15-20 psi at hot idle. ED

Steady Eddie 11-25-2007 12:28 PM

Ed--
15 to 20 PSi at hot idle and I'd be scared to death..anybody know what weight syn oil was put in it?? What oil pressure did it carry before the syn oil was added??

As an aside here: I have owned three BB Chevys
and they all had lots of oil pressure, maybe the
8.1 is different somehow..?

TandW 11-25-2007 01:32 PM

My guage responds as Ed suggests with full synthetic. Anyone driving beyond the torque range is wasting everything to get there 5 seconds earlier!!

Steady Eddie 11-25-2007 02:41 PM

As posted by T&W:
"...My guage responds as Ed suggests with full synthetic..."
==========================
What Weight Syn Oil???

depchief 11-25-2007 04:24 PM

My 8.1 GM BB runs operating oil pressure in the 40 to 45 PSI range. This pressure is the same using 5/30 full synthetic and was the same when using 5/30 regular oil. Each oil type was Castrol. The hot idle will be 15 to 20 and the highest I have seen was 54 PSI when the engine was started in 30 degree temperatures.
The 5.3L engine in my Suburban and pick up will run higher oil pressure reaching the mid 70's when running at highway speeds, idle will be in the 40 range.

I originally was confused with the pressure differences, but have talked with other 8.1 users and they all report the same pressures.

NeilV 11-26-2007 01:45 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by depchief:
My 8.1 GM BB runs operating oil pressure in the 40 to 45 PSI range. This pressure is the same using 5/30 full synthetic and was the same when using 5/30 regular oil. Each oil type was Castrol. The hot idle will be 15 to 20 and the highest I have seen was 54 PSI when the engine was started in 30 degree temperatures.
The 5.3L engine in my Suburban and pick up will run higher oil pressure reaching the mid 70's when running at highway speeds, idle will be in the 40 range.

I originally was confused with the pressure differences, but have talked with other 8.1 users and they all report the same pressures. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oil pressure over 45 to 50 lbs can actually harm an engine and start cutting up the bearings and blowing the front and rear main bearing seals. When installing high volume oil pumps in turbo charged engines we would usually have to put tri-metal bearings all around and use specially machined front and rear main bearings that had channels to divert the oil flow away from the seals and back toward the sump so we would not blow them out.

When I would buy the pumps the jobbers would warn me about the dangers of high oil pressures I would let him know that the pump specified was high volume and not high pressure. We would then make sure that we actually got the pump and bearing package that we ordered before leaving the shop.

Steady Eddie 11-26-2007 05:38 AM

I found help at the Workhorse.com site.
Technical FAQ #W000678-041306
Under the heading of "Oil Pressure" it explains
the concept of high volume-low pressure oiling
systems and it speaks of MINIMUM oil pressures,
NOT maximums. Using the example of 5W-30 wt. oil, it says that GM says that a hot idle pressure of between 2 and 10 PSI is OK.

If I were buying a used RV that only carried
that low of pressure at hot idle, I'd pass on
buying the Coach. Let alone a NEW Coach...

Mine must have the wrong oil pump in it.

74 PSI on mine at 3000 RPMs in high gear and
an indicated 40+ at hot idle. Maybe the MD 7400
L21 Vortecs are different?

edgray 11-26-2007 07:03 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Mine must have the wrong oil pump in it.

74 PSI on mine at 3000 RPMs in high gear and
an indicated 40+ at hot idle. Maybe the MD 7400
L21 Vortecs are different? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

SE: I'm not qualified to speak to your issues stated above. However, the purpose of my post was to assure other 8.1 L owners that they should not worry about their motors,as your post implied, simply because yours is "different". ED

Steady Eddie 11-26-2007 07:45 AM

From FreshAir's post:
"... and they do them, 8.1 MH, often.
Well, that worried me as there were old 8.1's on pallets all over the place. I asked the service manager what were they going to do with the old engines and he said just use them for salvage as Work Horse doesn't want any of them back. I thought, "Oh Man!" wish I hadn't seen this 8.1 salvage yard. Is this signs of things to come?.."
===========================
Ed--
This post was what got me..I knew nothing of
HVLP oiling systems, other than I knew we weren't talking of paint sprayers...I wondered
why the WH Service Shop would have dead 8.1s
laying all over the Yard, on pallets.

Then, still not being aware (ignorant) of the
(IMHO) OE low oil pressure, I thought maybe the
watery 5-30 Syn oil was too thin for good oiling?

I now believe that it is.

Photog 11-26-2007 09:39 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Steady Eddie:

Then, still not being aware (ignorant) of the
(IMHO) OE low oil pressure, I thought maybe the
watery 5-30 Syn oil was too thin for good oiling?

I now believe that it is. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I haven't noted syn 5w30 to be any more or less watery than the old dyno 5w30 version.

dieselclacker 11-26-2007 11:10 AM

Stock 454 Chevy engines do not carry 70 lbs of oil pressure going down the highway. I have owned three of them. Forty to forty five is the norm when hot. Ten to fifteen at hot idle.

Providing the volume is sufficient 10 pounds of oil pressure per 1000 RPM is plenty for most applications. Anymore than this and you are risking washing the engine bearings, and blowing out various seals within the engine.


Dieselclacker

JCM 11-26-2007 03:59 PM

It is possible that some of those blocks were there because of failed oil pump shafts. When mine went I was told by a Workhorse rep that there were a bunch that were manufactured by an outside source and they were overtempered. Mine sheared off the dogs ears and apparently mine lasted the longest at 34,000 miles. He said that most of the engines in which this happend were toasted because the owners didn't hear the feable warning or ignored it.
I asked why when my unit lost communication between the throttle and gas peddle it went in power down mode but that was not the case with a complete oil pressure failure. He suggested it was due to lawyers and the fear of a unit powering down in a intersection etc.
One of these days they - the manufacturer - will listen to the owners and mechanics.
Oh yes my oil pressure runs from about 20lbs at idle to 40 -45 at 4000+ rpm.

TandW 11-26-2007 06:38 PM

5w30 Castrol. Thinking about putting synthetic in my GM tranny. Any thoughts?

Steady Eddie 11-27-2007 05:55 AM

Dieselclacker wrote:
"...I have owned three of them..."

Me, too, and all three carried lots of oil pressure.

And..

"...Anymore than this and you are risking washing the engine bearings, and blowing out various seals within the engine..."

I think that bearings can be "washed" with
coolant that some how got into the crankcase,
but in this case, they are being bathed in oil,
no problems. It IS an issue with the case on
the spin-on oil flter (the can) and that can be avoided by using a known filter of good quality,
like a NAPA/Wix, which will handle LOTS of PSI.
The engine's seals are OK.

The differences in reported oil pressures are
directly related to the weight of oil being used. Over on the Forum: The Diesel Place, there
are 8.1 Owners reporting 70 PSI at road speed and 40 PSI at hot idle with the 8.1L.
But they are NOT using 5W-30 wt. oil.

vacation on wheels 11-27-2007 06:37 AM

Steady Eddy, I know you have the 454 engine and I have the 8.1L engine, but do you really travel at 3000rpm's in top gear? With the Allison 1000 5 speed trans, I would have to be climbing a long small-grade hill or going over 80mph to get to 3000 rpm in top gear. Why not have someone take a picture of your instrument cluster that shows 70+ psi at highway speed? I can tell you that 44-45psi oil pressure at highway speeds is normal on a 8.1L. I normally run at 2200-2400 rpm's at highway speeds in 5th gear.

Photog 11-27-2007 07:13 AM

It seems like this thread has been hijacked! https://irv2.infopop.cc/images/oboy.gif

edgray 11-27-2007 09:02 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">It seems like this thread has been hijacked! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Alas, it happens all the time. I too wish members would take the time to start a new topic, but these "conversations" seem to roam all over the place, hence we have these never-ending threads, even after the OP has put in a new engine and moved on. https://irv2.infopop.cc/images/sign0018.gif ED

dieselclacker 11-27-2007 02:23 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Steady Eddie:
Dieselclacker wrote:
"...I have owned three of them..."

Me, too, and all three carried lots of oil pressure.

And..

"...Anymore than this and you are risking washing the engine bearings, and blowing out various seals within the engine..."

I think that bearings can be "washed" with
coolant that some how got into the crankcase,
but in this case, they are being bathed in oil,
no problems. It IS an issue with the case on
the spin-on oil flter (the can) and that can be avoided by using a known filter of good quality,
like a NAPA/Wix, which will handle LOTS of PSI.
The engine's seals are OK.

The differences in reported oil pressures are
directly related to the weight of oil being used. Over on the Forum: The Diesel Place, there
are 8.1 Owners reporting 70 PSI at road speed and 40 PSI at hot idle with the 8.1L.
But they are NOT using 5W-30 wt. oil. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Eddie, oil pump pressure regulator/relief valves work with 15W50 as well as with 5W30. The oil pump even at 3000 RPM will bypass pressure thru this valve, unless of course it has been equipped with a heavier spring or had the original shimmed up. Bearing wash has nothing to do with coolant in crankcase. It is about oil supply being supplied at too great a pressure to adhere to the crank surfaces of an engine. If you are happy with 70lbs pressure, well thats all that counts. I think you are wise to use a quality filter, as start up oil pressure with 50 wt oil could really be a problem. https://irv2.infopop.cc/groupee_commo...s/icon_eek.gif

Dieselclacker


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