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-   -   Not stuck in Death Valley -- Blown engine! (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f22/not-stuck-in-death-valley-blown-engine-26120.html)

bruceh 11-15-2007 08:23 AM

The engine is completely stock, absolutely no mods at all. The oil level was in the normal range as was the oil pressure (before, during and after destruction). The water warmed up to mid range but never overheated.

I don't know what to do about the oil in the future. It doesn't make sense to me that the oil had anything to do with the problem but there is this unnerving coincidence.

I drove the motor home up Towne pass towing the Jeep in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 with no problems. I wasn't going very fast at the summit but the engine didn't self-destruct. My old motor home with the Ford 460 did the grade in 1998, 1999, 2000 and 2001 with no problems but pulling a lighter toad.

I realize that I will need to do something different in the future. I guess that I had too much confidence in my engine.

I could go the long way around but I really like driving across the desert and, yes, I like Death Valley a lot. We go every November for the 49er encampment. I suppose that in the future, I will use the interstate.

The point is being made that a rebuild can be quite acceptable. I realize this and had I been home, I would have put more effort into researching this. The economics are still that the engine would have to come out and a lot of labor would have to go into the rebuild along with some parts. Being in Pahrump with zero local knowledge, I opted for the new engine. I might have made the same decision if I were home but that wasn't an option (not without a very expensive tow).

Speaking of towing, we have AAA+ which covers the first $200 of an RV tow and Foremost Insurance which will cover $250. The next $350 is on me.

DonavonP 11-15-2007 09:01 AM

Bruce, I think you're smart getting a new engine instead of a rebuild.

Hope you get back on the road with no more problems.

Max Hubrich 11-15-2007 09:37 AM

Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil----

NeilV 11-15-2007 03:09 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.

This is a common side effect of doing an engine flush when one has waited too long and ends up doing more harm than good.

dieselclacker 11-15-2007 03:44 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.

This is a common side effect of doing an engine flush when one has waited too long and ends up doing more harm than good. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Neil, what do you use to "flush" an engine?

Dieselclacker

NeilV 11-15-2007 06:25 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by dieselclacker:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
Bruce--

It's still a heck of a lot cheaper to pump $13-15 thou into a new motor than spending $75-100 thou more on a new(or newer) rig-- good move the way I see it. I too think it is an uneasy coincidence on the oil switch. I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.

This is a common side effect of doing an engine flush when one has waited too long and ends up doing more harm than good. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Neil, what do you use to "flush" an engine?

Dieselclacker </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I usually change the oil regularly enough and with good oil so that I don't have need to. In the old days we would use range oil or kerosene however there are specialty products out there now for this purpose. In the case of replacing a blown head gasket with moderate water intrusion into the oil pan or a long overdue oil change, some 5-20 motor oil and a new filter, run it for ten minutes or so and then immediatly change it again.

On an engine with some years on it I would remove the valve covers and oil pan, scrape them clean then put them in a parts washer to finish the job. Pull the pickup off the oil pump and clean it in the parts washer too. Now inspect the buildup on the heads and block and consider whether it needs to be soaked in a tank or to be stripped down and cleaned.

Bottom line I avoid engine oil flushes and will only use them as a last resort when I really don't care so there is not any one that I prefer or would reccomend.

Tom N 11-16-2007 08:39 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It has always been my understanding that synthetic oil had less detergents/additives than dino oil, because less were needed.

-Tom

Tom N 11-16-2007 08:58 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Max Hubrich:
I'll stick to good 'ole Pennzoil---- </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Pennzoil hasn't been good 'ole Pennzoil in about 25 years. At one time Pennzoil was made from the best crude in the world, 100% Pennsylvania paraffin based crude oil. But, after Pennzoil was sold in the 1970's they have used asphalt based crude. Ditto for Quaker State, Wolf's Head and a few others.

The only 100% PA paraffin based oil made today is made in PA by the American Refining Group's Bradford, PA refinery and marketed under the brand name of Brad Penn.

See: https://www.amref.com/

-Tom

FrontRangeRVer 11-16-2007 06:39 PM

Tom is right...and I will add, there is no way that Synthetic oil had anything to do with the engine damage or bearing damage.

Lukeaa 11-16-2007 07:44 PM

I am coming into this discussion late, but in July I lost a head gasket on my 05 Admiral at 17,500 miles. It overheated on a grade, and WH said we are putting in a new engine. Five weeks later, I had a new engine that is running perfectly. August is a bad time to get an engine put in, because all of the shops are backed up. However, WH was great and I am a happy customer. They just wanted to see three invoices for oil changes. New engine for zero cost.

max49 11-16-2007 08:31 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Lukeaa: They just wanted to see three invoices for oil changes. New engine for zero cost. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I change my own oil so I have 'no invoices'. Could they deny a warranty claim because I don't have receipts for the oil & filter?

I always thought the engine should easily out last the rest of the MH. Now I'm hearing about all these blown 8.1's. Is it a good reliable engine or not?

NeilV 11-17-2007 02:45 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tom N:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
It may not be just a coincidence. A bit of sludge in the oil galleries could have been dislodged by the high detergency of the synthetic oil and plugged the feed to the bearing that spun.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It has always been my understanding that synthetic oil had less detergents/additives than dino oil, because less were needed.

-Tom </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It may have to have less added due to its nature but it does a really good job of penetrating on its own.

I lost the bearings on a Turbocharged engine that went all its life on dino without problems until we changed it over too late in its life to synthetic. Caught it right away before spinning or grinding anything up and was able to just polish the mains and crank pins and then replace the bearing inserts. Had to clean the sludge but no metal shavings out of the oil galleries also as they were now plugged. The diagnosis was that the synthetic dislodged enough oil that had been cooked by the turbo that it caused the bypass on the oil filter to open and plug things up further down the line. We also replaced the oil pump and pickup/strainer while we were at it.

One more reason to be faithfull on oil changes always using high quality oil and filters. I do use synthetic but make the switch sooner rather than later.

edgray 11-17-2007 05:56 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I change my own oil so I have 'no invoices'. Could they deny a warranty claim because I don't have receipts for the oil & filter? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
MAX49: IF you don't have a receipt from a "shop" for the required services, and you also don't have a receipt to prove when you bought the oil and filter to do the service yourself, then you are "probably" not in a position to "prove" that required service has been completed on ANY type of schedule. What would you expect GM to do, just take your "word" for it? Good luck with that! ED

JCM 11-17-2007 07:44 AM

Keep a log book of all services, modifications etc. It will help your memory and be informative to the 2nd owner or can be used for warentee claims.


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