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Joe-K 10-05-2006 05:12 AM

With Fall upon us, we've been in my favorite time of the year to camp. One tough thing to deal with during the cooler weather is the humidty inside the rig. How many folks wake up in the morning to steamed up windows and condensation on the metal frames around the windows?

How does everyone deal with reducing the moisture so it doesn't steam up the windows. Our side windows are double pane so they are fine, but the front windshield gets wet overnight.

I just bought one of the Mini-Dehumidifiers and it works great at reducing the sweating, but what other tricks are there to do.

Joe-K 10-05-2006 05:12 AM

With Fall upon us, we've been in my favorite time of the year to camp. One tough thing to deal with during the cooler weather is the humidty inside the rig. How many folks wake up in the morning to steamed up windows and condensation on the metal frames around the windows?

How does everyone deal with reducing the moisture so it doesn't steam up the windows. Our side windows are double pane so they are fine, but the front windshield gets wet overnight.

I just bought one of the Mini-Dehumidifiers and it works great at reducing the sweating, but what other tricks are there to do.

NLOVNIT 10-05-2006 08:21 AM

I've been seriously considering getting that little dehumidifier. I know Mike has both that & the crystal one & really likes them.

I don't know how well this trick will work on a windshield, but it does work on the bathroom mirrors when they fog up from shower steam condensation, which would be similar to any other glass condensing: I wipe the mirrors down with a tiny dollop of shaving cream. Use only a tiny bit, it goes a long way. I don't understand how it works, but it keeps the bathroom mirrors from fogging up. Lasts the whole season.

Also, keeping air moving seems to cut down on condensation on all but the most coldest of cold days.

L-

Tom N 10-05-2006 10:57 AM

Service Tips WIT Club News February 2005

CONDENSATION

With cooler outside temperatures you are likely to experience condensation inside your motor home. Fulltimers and those who take extended winter trips will probably encounter moisture first noticed on the inside of windows and walls.

Many of our daily activities generate this moisture. One source suggests that breathing and perspiration alone can generate as much as three pounds of vapor per person per day! Add cooking, bathing, washing dishes and laundry, and it is easy to see that a lot of water vapor or humidity can be introduced into a coach in a relatively short amount of time. Imagine the effects of this moisture accumulation over several days if not dealt with in some manner.

The most effective way to deal with condensation is to ventilate your coach. Modern construction methods, with improved insulation and weather stripping, create a living space that can be virtually airtight when closed up, allowing little or no moisture laden air to escape. At the same time, metal structure within the sidewalls and around openings conducts the cold into the vehicle where it condenses the moisture in the air. Removing this moist air is the best way to prevent this condensation from forming.

Effects of condensation within a motor home can range from foggy windows to water literally running down the walls. Items stored in enclosed spaces such as cabinets and drawers can actually become damp and musty. If left unattended, mold and mildew can form. In more severe cases, you may develop dry rot or structural damage to the wooden components in the coach. This type of damage often goes unattended, as it may not be readily visible and is usually quite expensive to repair. In order to help guard against the effects of condensation in your motor home we have complied the following list of "do's" and "don'ts."

DO:
" Be conscious of activities that generate moisture and humidity.
" Open a window or roof vent slightly when camping in cold conditions.
" Use your range hood fan when cooking.
" Open your bath vent when bathing or showering.
" Avoid generating unnecessary steam from boiling water or running hot faucets.
" Check enclosed areas such as cabinets and wardrobes for signs of moisture accumulation.
" Wipe dry and damp or wet areas as you find them.
" Check washer/dryer vents frequently.
" Thoroughly clean any areas of mold or mildew.

DON'T:
" Bring unnecessary sources of moisture into the coach snow on shoes or soaked clothes.
" Put items in storage when they are damp or wet.
" Hang wet laundry to air dry.
" Allow condensation to dissipate on its own.
" Overfill storage areas with little air circulation.
" Park over wet or muddy surfaces that may increase moisture levels within the coach.
In addition to the suggestions listed, many people will utilize a small fan to increase circulation within the living quarters. There are also small mechanical dehumidifiers that do an excellent job of deterring the buildup of condensation.

Whatever steps you take to minimize condensation and its effects in your motor home, it will help to prevent costly damage and make your time spent camping during colder conditions more enjoyable!

[Source: WIT Club News Feb 2005]

Joe-K 10-06-2006 02:57 AM

Very good article Tom. Thanks for posting it.

sandra 10-17-2006 08:17 AM

Living in Alberta Canada are winters are long, so we do a lot of winter camping. You may already know this, but we find using an electric heater does help with the humidty in the coach. Enjoy!


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