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-   -   Chock Question (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f50/chock-question-428545.html)

ScoobyDoo 01-28-2019 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 60sumtin (Post 4610200)
I said nothing about lifting the trailer. Use them as they are intended to be used - as stabilizer jacks. Whether the stab jacks are used or not check the tires once a month and keep them properly inflated. More often if need be.

LOL. It's yours, do what you want..

Quote:

Drop your stab jacks with wood under them as well so there's plenty of weight on them and combined with the tongue jack you have 5 additional points on the ground to keep your trailer from rolling.
If you are trying to keep it from rolling, I'm not sure the side loads where part of the design specs.
Lifting the trailer with the stabilizers transfers the weight from axle to corners of frame. Air going out of tire while the stabs are down is different deal, it transfers the weight from axle to corners of frame.
If I hit a nail Friday on the way home, back the camper in and unhook. Sunday, I can see camper is leaning. But the stabs down, the frame will be hanging by the corners for a month before you dig out the gauge...

60sumtin 01-28-2019 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScoobyDoo (Post 4610391)
LOL. It's yours, do what you want..



If you are trying to keep it from rolling, I'm not sure the side loads where part of the design specs.
Lifting the trailer with the stabilizers transfers the weight from axle to corners of frame. Air going out of tire while the stabs are down is different deal, it transfers the weight from axle to corners of frame.
If I hit a nail Friday on the way home, back the camper in and unhook. Sunday, I can see camper is leaning. But the stabs down, the frame will be hanging by the corners for a month before you dig out the gauge...

Yeah...LOL. :facepalm: Apparently you glossed over the winter part in my original statement. The point I was making is what I did last winter was sufficient to keep the trailer from rolling which is what the question was about. Let's not exaggerate things just to make an argument.

ScoobyDoo 01-28-2019 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 60sumtin (Post 4610545)
Yeah...LOL. :facepalm: Apparently you glossed over the winter part in my original statement. The point I was making is what I did last winter was sufficient to keep the trailer from rolling which is what the question was about. Let's not exaggerate things just to make an argument.


Well, my camper goes out at least once most months. And I might be exaggerating the harm to the trailer from lifting the corners, but I have seen the warning in enough manuals, and looked at how flimsy some frames are built to not gamble. And from my experience, if a wood chock, or anything except X chock will hold, it will hold from now on, unless something pushes. If on a steep slope, then yes, it is better to have the chock secured to something under the tire, so the tire rolling can't slide the chock. (I imagine my blocks bolted to mudflap would hold my trailer on any slope my truck could push it up). I kind of like backing in until see trailer go up then down the 2 inches. Crank the coupler above the ball, and it will be right there when I back up again...
Now if I was to build a trailer it would have air bags for springs, and a couple of bars attached to the frame about 11 and 1 o'clock on the wheel. When ready to unhook, dump the air. Less of a step to get in, and it sure would not roll...

Persistent 01-29-2019 04:31 PM

Chocks work on any ground that can carry the weight of the TT. They do not rely on being able to resist pushing. The radius of the tire must be less than the radius on the chock. As the tire rolls onto the chock, it exerts a downward force that anchors the chock. The farther the tire rolls onto the chock the greater the down force. Only a chock without weight on it will slide easily.

Brenwol1 01-30-2019 05:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Persistent (Post 4612579)
Chocks work on any ground that can carry the weight of the TT. They do not rely on being able to resist pushing. The radius of the tire must be less than the radius on the chock. As the tire rolls onto the chock, it exerts a downward force that anchors the chock. The farther the tire rolls onto the chock the greater the down force. Only a chock without weight on it will slide easily.

Yes, you are absolutely correct. My brain tells me that, but my paranoia screams otherwise! [emoji2]

Since the solutions are cheap, this time I think paranoia wins.

Thanks to all for info and opinions.

Bigbird65 01-30-2019 09:34 AM

If you area do-it-yourself person then you can make your own chocks that are very effective. 2 x 4, 1/2" all thread with nuts with washers.
https://i.imgur.com/liebLyol.jpg

GoLeafsGo 01-31-2019 07:57 PM

These have worked well for me...
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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