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-   -   How cold can a Tropi Cal go? (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f105/how-cold-can-a-tropi-cal-go-449040.html)

Kahoona 06-21-2019 09:59 AM

How cold can a Tropi Cal go?
 
We bought a used 2008 National Tropical and can't find anything about it's cold resistance. I know there is heat in the wet bay and the fridge has a heated water hose bit nothing in the manual says weather it is 4 season or frost-proof.

I once lived on PA and spent time in Vermont but I am barely frost-proof myself but it might be good to know:rolleyes:

Jim_HiTek 06-22-2019 09:05 AM

Without dual pane windows, I'd say it's a fair weather package. Even with dual paned windows, it's still a bear to heat these things. Almost all RVs have passive heating in the wet bay, and the small heater for the ice maker water line is inexpensive so manufacturers often put them in all their models, so those two things don't make yours a cold weather rig.

Here's what I'd consider essential components for a cold weather package...

Does it have dual pane windows? How about the ceiling? Is it 4" thick foam? In the wet bay, are there heat blankets under the tanks? Is everything sealed up tight under the dash or do you have drafts?

Not as important but I like a heat pump better for cold weather. At least down to 40F, but then there's the gas floor furnace for below that temp.

In my Winnie model, the ceiling has 4" foam insulation, it's even inside of the extruded aluminum edge pieces that run the full length of the RV. But those other Winnie models like mine but were less expensive when new and are without dual pane windows, I have found that there's no foam in their edge pieces. Just little things like that can make a difference.

Kahoona 06-23-2019 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim_HiTek (Post 4830818)
Without dual pane windows, I'd say it's a fair weather package. Even with dual paned windows, it's still a bear to heat these things. Almost all RVs have passive heating in the wet bay, and the small heater for the ice maker water line is inexpensive so manufacturers often put them in all their models, so those two things don't make yours a cold weather rig.

Here's what I'd consider essential components for a cold weather package...

Does it have dual pane windows? How about the ceiling? Is it 4" thick foam? In the wet bay, are there heat blankets under the tanks? Is everything sealed up tight under the dash or do you have drafts?

Not as important but I like a heat pump better for cold weather. At least down to 40F, but then there's the gas floor furnace for below that temp.

In my Winnie model, the ceiling has 4" foam insulation, it's even inside of the extruded aluminum edge pieces that run the full length of the RV. But those other Winnie models like mine but were less expensive when new and are without dual pane windows, I have found that there's no foam in their edge pieces. Just little things like that can make a difference.


Thanks for the info. We do have the double pane windows. Not sure about the blankets under tanks but I'll have a look. There is about 4" of insulation in the roof and under the floor. Not sure about under the dash, I'll look there. No insulation up behind the TV in the front overhead but now that we have all the AV out and gone we plan to insulate up there.

Civdiv99 06-23-2019 06:55 PM

My experience from winter trips and weekends snowmobiling in a 2005 Dolphin. Dual pane windows, a branch of the gas furnace blowing into the basement. The usual, nothing special. Construction methods and materials likely similar to yours, insulated basement doors, etc. All I did was turn off the line to the outside part of fridge feeding the ice maker.

Down to 30 - comfy, maybe chilly way up in the cockpit floor and windshield there, farthest from furnace vents.

20s - ok, floor maybe has cold areas in corners, furnace and systems keep up and cycle, but do run frequently at night with no sun heating helping.

Teens - only if I have to. To many cold spots, lots of furnace running. I can really tell at the the very back along the back wall since the bed blocks direct air flow. Once climb in bed though, all doable.

Stuff in cupboards didn’t appear to freeze.

BTW the basement was always quite warm, comparatively speaking. I stored the boots and heavy coats there and was really surprised how warm they were in the mornings when it was maybe 20~25 or so out. I didn’t worry about tanks after that.

I’ve traveled in snow and below freezing many times over the years and I only notice when it gets down into low 20s. Then I can tell just padding around without shoes that corners away from furnace vents are cool.


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