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shooo63 07-30-2019 10:23 AM

Middle aged lady looking for advice
 
Hi,

So my kids are going to take my grandkids away to Washington on a year long search for property. They are going to spend a couple months at a time in different locales to find the perfect area within an hour of Vancouver.

They've asked me to join them on this adventure but I need my own trailer and vehicle.:cool:.

I want to stay under 6000 pounds, 20 ft, and need the right vehicle to tow it.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!!!

AND GO.....

Finance 07-30-2019 11:06 AM

Why vehicle and trailer vs a B or small C?

As far as what fits your criteria, that’s a huge universe of products. Tell us some attributes you want to narrow the field. How many passengers does the vehicle have to carry? What do you like or not like in a floor plan? Will you be staying in full hookup parks?

And what’s the budget? It’s a big gap between a Mercedes towing an Airstream and a Chevy towing a Forest River.

bneukam 07-30-2019 11:19 AM

I like Lance 1475, 1575, and 1685. Expensive, but hold their resale really well.

Winnebago Minnie series would also be a great choice.

If your thinking of only owning it for a short timeframe definitely look at used.
If your not experienced with RVís find someone who is and inspect any new or used very carefully.

Mr_D 07-30-2019 11:31 AM

Which Vancouver? The one in WA state where I live or that "johnny come lately" one in BC?

Glen 3 07-30-2019 11:37 AM

I was going to ask the same question about Vancouver because most people forget that there are Two, Vancouver and the little one in Washington. [emoji6]
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr_D (Post 4888304)
Which Vancouver? The one in WA state where I live or that "johnny come lately" one in BC?


shooo63 07-30-2019 11:39 AM

Budget is 30k ish for both, going with both since it's only a year. Would love a murphy bed model so it's a little roomier.

Only me in the truck or SUV. Used is the way I'm gonna go.

We will be in mostly full hook up since I'm not the boondocking kinda gal.

Glen 3 07-30-2019 11:44 AM

My suggestion is to look at either the Winnebago 1706FB (which we just bought) or if you really want a trouble free experience the T@B 400. Both of these are 19 ft hitch to bumper. The T@B has less storage space due to the shape but is otherwise high quality and well designed. It is expensive though. Both of these trailers can be towed by properly equipped SUVs. The Winnebago might tow slightly easier because it has tandom axles.

Sandy Swede 07-30-2019 11:47 AM

If you are sticking to a trailer 20' or less, I am not aware of any that would weigh over 6,000 lbs. In fact, according to the following article, you shouldn't be over 5,000 lbs fully loaded for a 20' TT.
https://campergrid.com/travel-trailer-average-weight/


As far as a tow vehicle, which do you prefer, pickup or SUV?

shooo63 07-30-2019 12:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sandy Swede (Post 4888332)
If you are sticking to a trailer 20' or less, I am not aware of any that would weigh over 6,000 lbs. In fact, according to the following article, you shouldn't be over 5,000 lbs fully loaded for a 20' TT.
https://campergrid.com/travel-trailer-average-weight/


As far as a tow vehicle, which do you prefer, pickup or SUV?

I prefer an suv but was wondering if a 6 cyl Ranger would work. Less expensive.

Also, thoughts on a Keystone 151?

rodekyll 07-30-2019 12:01 PM

Why not a tiny class A like a Trek or a Minnie-Winnie? They can be had for $15k +/- and will give you the "murphy bed" effect. Without the dedicated bedroom, those 25' look large.

Q: what is an hour away from Vancouver?
A: -- Portland south, Battle Ground, north. I've been in Vancouver three times in the last month. You need an hour to find the freeway from the on-ramp. It makes Seattle look like Tacoma.

shooo63 07-30-2019 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rodekyll (Post 4888352)
Why not a tiny class A like a Trek or a Minnie-Winnie? They can be had for $15k +/- and will give you the "murphy bed" effect. Without the dedicated bedroom, those 25' look large.

Q: what is an hour away from Vancouver?
A: -- Portland south, Battle Ground, north. I've been in Vancouver three times in the last month. You need an hour to find the freeway from the on-ramp. It makes Seattle look like Tacoma.

I definitely want to be able to unhook the vehicle. And the Trek has a wet bath....ewwww!
I'm going to living in it for a year while the kids look for property and move around every couple of months. But thanks.

Mr_D 07-30-2019 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glen 3 (Post 4888313)
I was going to ask the same question about Vancouver because most people forget that there are Two, Vancouver and the little one in Washington. [emoji6]

Even Microsoft can't tell the difference!

1bigmess 07-30-2019 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glen 3 (Post 4888313)
I was going to ask the same question about Vancouver because most people forget that there are Two, Vancouver and the little one in Washington. [emoji6]

The one in the USA was first. :thumb:

If coming to the Portland Area/SW WA for an extended stay, make sure you've got a reservation first. Very hard to find space for long term stays around here.

shooo63 07-30-2019 12:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr_D (Post 4888304)
Which Vancouver? The one in WA state where I live or that "johnny come lately" one in BC?

Washington, my daughter is transferring out there.

rodekyll 07-30-2019 12:24 PM

I don't understand "wet bath."

Podivin 07-30-2019 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rodekyll (Post 4888388)
I don't understand "wet bath."

A wet bath is where the toilet is IN the shower stall (or maybe the shower head is in the toilet area) - so you can't take a shower without getting the toilet all wet. You see it often in boats, and in small RVs.

Normal_Dave 07-30-2019 01:53 PM

I'd start by following DebiT's quest for a similar setup, "wash everything in hot water" to suit your budget. Maybe even reach out to her via PM. She made an excellent choice for her needs.

Tow Vehicle
https://www.irv2.com/forums/f50/compa...kg-438494.html

Trailer
https://www.irv2.com/forums/f50/best-...er-438348.html

DebiT 07-30-2019 05:06 PM

Yep, got a Dodge Durango and a 2015 Casita Spirit Deluxe, 17 feet, wet bath, love it. Getting used to being solo little by little

Itchytoe 07-30-2019 05:21 PM

Travel Trailer: 2020 Forest River Wolf Pup 16FQ-D $11,400, 21'6" long, 4,000 pounds loaded, Murphy bed, separate shower and toilet and sink, handle to help going in and out.



Tow Vehicle: 2013 Ford Explorer $15,000, 3rd row seating, sunroof, backup camera, navigation, all wheel drive...


Total of about $27,000 + TT&L. That should put you right at $30,000 and you'll have a 2020 model year travel trailer.



You can also pick up a 2011ish Ranger for even cheaper if you like the Ranger. Heck, I bet you can even get an F150 for $15,000ish and you'd have absolutely no problems towing that trailer.

csuder99 07-30-2019 05:50 PM

Hmm... WA state for a year would include winter. That pretty much excludes "price-optimized" offerings from FR and Thor. I live not that far away in Central Oregon and come October the heater in the Wolfpup I had did run 15-20 minutes out of an hour.

That presents a bit of conundrum because trailers with better insulation, heated tanks etc. tend to be more expensive and heavier. Heavier in turn requires a bigger tow vehicle.

Maybe look at something like the Nash 17k (full disclosure: that's what I own), or if you can swing it Arctic Fox or Outdoor RV. All of these are made in Oregon for the Pacific NW so you could pick one up at a good price close to the factory.

1bigmess 07-30-2019 06:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by csuder99 (Post 4888775)
Hmm... WA state for a year would include winter.

Vancouver/Portland area is warmer, and much wetter, than Central OR in the winter. Any decently built but well maintained trailer will be ok here, but the more insulation the better in any conditions.

In cold weather, you'll be battling interior condensation. I usually just wipe it down with paper towels and throw them away, and I keep a little dehumidifier running to help remove moisture. If you winter West of the Cascades, liquid water will be your biggest threat. East of the Cascades, it will be more cold and solid forms of water will be more of a problem, along with keeping water flowing and sewage tanks thawed for dumping, especially in a cheaper trailer with less insulation to help protect from the cold.

I've had my ORV 19B in temps that were about -10 at night and about 10 for a daily high, but keeping everything flowing and safe was more a matter of preparation, because once frozen you might not be able to catch up to the problem until it gets warm enough to thaw out.

And no matter where you are if it's cold, you'll have condensation in the RV in some form. Best to know this ahead of time.

Isaac-1 07-31-2019 12:16 AM

I think you are thinking Roadtrek vans, where the poster above was referring to a Safari Trek class A, none of which ever had a wet bath. See this youtube video for an example of one of their smaller models (unless you go back to the early 1990's Isuzu chassis models which are a little smaller)



This one is one size smaller than mine (29 inches shorter)


p.s. You can find an 01 Safari Trek 2430 for around $22,000-24,000 in fairly good shape with a bit of shopping, or an 97-98 model for about $18,000 or so, again in good shape, not a fixer upper. The first Trek I looked at was a 1996 2830 for sale 3 miles from my house, seller was down to $4,900 or make offer when I walked away, it was a money pit.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLRH2jUmbbs

Persistent 07-31-2019 06:24 AM

Quality Travel Trailer Brands
 
Check out this link on iRV2 for good advice.
https://www.irv2.com/forums/f50/best-...-443427-2.html :dance:

grindstone01 07-31-2019 06:34 AM

Take time to visit some RV dealers and look at what they have to offer. That will help narrow your search down to what you can live with, both $$ and living comfort.

Normal_Dave 07-31-2019 06:46 AM

Well, here you go...
A Durango setup like DebiT's, has Trailer Tow Group IV, and not too far from home. Hire an ASE certified mechanic to check it out.

https://images.craigslist.org/00D0D_...U_1200x900.jpg
https://chicago.craigslist.org/nwc/c...942875839.html

Hook up to something like this, a Winnebago Minnie Drop.
https://www.winnebagomotorhomes.com/...61101-i2522819

That should get you in the ballpark. :dance:

Persistent 07-31-2019 09:50 AM

Full time in 20 foot TT
 
It is a rare 20 foot TT that is designed for full time living. You can still do it if you learn how and are willing to change your life style.

Managing moisture in cold weather is foremost. Managing freezing is another. Most TT's have a furnace. You can use electric heaters. Even a small heater will do a good job in a small TT. A dehumidifier running full time will help a lot.

However, frozen plumbing is an entirely different issue. A Dutchman or Keystone may say it is "All Season". It may say it has an "enclosed and heated underbelly". That does not mean plumbing will work when temps drop below 32 degrees F.

Advertising is bait. Truth is something different. TT mfg and dealers will tell you anything you want to hear to make the sale. Buyer beware.

A quick test to see if a TT is likely to be freeze proof is to look at the waste tank dump valves. If they are exposed, the TT is not freeze proof. Also look for dual pane windows.

Even if the TT is built for occupation in freezing weather, there is still a lot to learn about keeping your equipment working and safe in cold and freezing weather.

Good luck in your new adventure!:dance:

rodekyll 07-31-2019 11:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Podivin (Post 4888393)
A wet bath is where the toilet is IN the shower stall (or maybe the shower head is in the toilet area) - so you can't take a shower without getting the toilet all wet. You see it often in boats, and in small RVs.

I wouldn't want that either.

ktn1966 07-31-2019 12:37 PM

You need to first start going to RV lots and sitting in all of them. Big, large, small, tt, 5th wheel, class A, B and C. Find the floor plan that you will like. I can tell you that we have owned a Northwood and now an ORV, and how I love them but you may not.

Second, look at your budget once you find the ones that will fit your life style and start adjusting for what you will need to upgrade on the RVs to make it livable FOR YOU. Not what others think. You can buy an expensive RV but they do not include all the addons such as golf cart batteries or solar panels.

Third, now research the ones that made the final cut. Most people start this process to early. Narrow down your list even more.

Fourth, go sit in the final list RVs for a couple of hours. Invite the salesman in and entertain him in your "house". This will be your house for the amount of time you are living in the RV. Can you make dinner comfortably, is the bathroom big enough.

Last, buy the one you want, then buy the Tow Vehicle or Toad that fits the RV.

Last pieces of advice.

Looking online is a good place to start but you have to get out and get inside them.

It is different to camp in a 21 foot RV than to live full time in one.

The PNW is tough on RVs due to moisture, do not get single pane windows. Buy and leave running a dehumidifier. Make sure you leave cabinets and drawers occasionally to help stop moisture build up.

If looking at new the is wiggle room on price and sometimes they will drop trailer price to help with the addons.

ScoobyDoo 07-31-2019 03:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Persistent (Post 4889505)
It is a rare 20 foot TT that is designed for full time living. You can still do it if you learn how and are willing to change your life style.

But a lot can depend on the comfort expectation of the full timer. When working, I would sometimes live for a couple weeks at a time in a 5X8 sleeper.
Couple years ago I met a lady in a state park laundry room. She said one more week, the COE campground down the road would get the shower house open, so she was looking at 4 weeks only need to tow about 5 miles. By that time she hoped not to need the walker. I helped her carry her clean clothes out to her little pickup. She had a shell on the pickup, and a big drawer so she could pull out, hang her clothes, a little dresser mounted on the big pullout. Walking past her site she had a little guy teardrop. Behind it, a EZ-up with walls to keep weather off her when she used the rear outside kitchen of that trailer. One of the little popup shower tents outside one door of the trailer. She had the little truck parked so somebody would have to try to see her if she went out that door into the shower tent. She told me she was 74, had been full time for 5 years. Not for me, but she was happy chasing good weather.

jarata 07-31-2019 04:12 PM

Since the kids are making you follow them and probobly watching the kids alot while they look for houses .Make them pay for it

shooo63 08-01-2019 06:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jarata (Post 4889973)
Since the kids are making you follow them and probobly watching the kids alot while they look for houses .Make them pay for it

That's a great idea, but it's never gonna happen!!!!

MrsChilerick 08-01-2019 07:38 AM

So, Iím confused. If the goal is to find a place within an hour of Vancouver, why not rent a small house there for a year rather than spend a bunch of money on an RV and car you may not want after that time?

shooo63 08-01-2019 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MrsChilerick (Post 4890692)
So, Iím confused. If the goal is to find a place within an hour of Vancouver, why not rent a small house there for a year rather than spend a bunch of money on an RV and car you may not want after that time?

The kids want to look for property in the area to build on. As they are looking they want to do a lot of hiking and have adventures. I'm just tagging along for fun.

Itasca66 08-03-2019 03:16 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Target a deal like this .. Then put new tires and batteries and make sure all works .. there's alot good used out there . Rules no water damage and have seller show you everything works . And see that refrigerator works before buying .. don't leave a stone unturned before you buy . If you target $20,000 gives ya $10,000 to have for fixes ..
If you want less headaches do without pop outs .
To give you a idea . I spent $13,500 and have a rig ready to go .. 47,000 miles on it ..bought it with 42,000 class A . But everyone has there own ideas what needs to look like . Older is ok if looks taking care of .. Attachment 255612

Yoders2Go 08-04-2019 04:58 PM

I'd get a class C or a van conversion, something you are comfortable driving. Be easy on yourself. Pack light and enjoy.

Roger6730 08-04-2019 06:42 PM

Sounds like a travel trailer is what your looking for. Lots of them out there at good prices. Suggest a tandem axle for your safety, and plan on replacing tires, bearings and maybe brakes before the trip. Check RV Trader, local classified, etc.
Best of luck and enjoy the experience.

Johnynorthla 08-04-2019 07:48 PM

I would consider a Class B. Look at the Winnibago Travato. We had a one was too small for our family of 3 and a dog, but I definitely could see it being useful for a single person. This way you donít have the stress of towing you can drive just about anywhere with it. Iíve taken it to fast food drive-throughĎs as well as our bank ATM drive-through! It drove like a big SUV!

Kamani74 08-05-2019 04:59 AM

I love the Retro trailers by Riverside. They are well built and the layouts are really nice. They have different sizes and the 19í is really sweet. I think the Amish build them. I would have bought on, but we bought a 26í Lazy Daze.

Mudflat 08-05-2019 05:40 AM

Read the Articles
 
All good answers here. Since you are new to RVing I would suggest that you check out my articles which are published on [url=https://www.thisoldcampsite.com, especially one titled ”Pre-Delivery Inspection Checklist”. This is important especially since you’re buying used. My email is at the end of every article so please feel free to contact me if you have any questions. You have to open each article to see who wrote it so look for the ones written by Warren (That’s me).
Nobody makes any money with this website. We just like helping other RVers. Why learn from your mistakes when you can learn from someone else’s mistakes?
Good luck & let us know how this all goes for you.

LarryFlew 08-05-2019 08:09 AM

This may or may not help but our first venture into TT and 5 month trip was a Dodge Durango with Hemi (would not consider the 6 banger myself) pulling a 28 foot lightweight Forest River Freedom that was in the 6K area. Being only one of you would be even better than the two of us and dogs were. Towing wise the Hemi Durango got 8mpg average with near 10 on straight highways and as los as 6 traveling the hills in and around AZ and NV. Being you would be even shorter and lighter you would do better on all. I would put quality of the Freedom on a mid level with things like trim gaps etc being evident. Plenty storage etc.


HOWEVER being we where in the larger space needed group after 2 years we went to an Alpine 37 foot 5th wheel for the room. Value wise our trade on the Freedom was almost exactly what we paid for it 2 years before that but we did purchase just as new models where coming out and dealer wanted to move the ones that where not the new year model.

8Ballred 08-05-2019 09:51 AM

I'm 54 single lady and started looking at all Youtube videos to narrow down what I wanted. But mine is for extended stay since I need to live on Moms property and take care of her. I chose a 33ft Class A. Love it. It's all contained. If you have never driven or backed up a trailer I would suggest a Class C. They can be really fantastic, Short and can go anywhere. No hitching and Un-hitching necessary and I think it could be a lot less to deal with for you overall. But I made a list of all pro-and cons of both and based my decision on that. So do a lot of studying before you decide. Got mine on Craigslist actually.

Suzanna 08-05-2019 04:00 PM

I have 2019 Lance 1475 (love it!) that I pull with my 2016 Honda Pilot AWD, I did have a transmission cooler put in at the time the hitch was placed, but they do come with a tow package. I did have to add a sway bar, but after that it pulls nicely. A few weeks back I had my first mountain climb to 9000 feet up Mt Graham here in AZ, once I drop it down to low gear it was a breeze. A few here would probably say a Pilot is a vehicle meant for hauling children not trailers, but it is what I had and it works.
I had my heart set on one of those cute tear drop trailers, but after sitting in it for 15 minutes at the dinette and thinking "if this was a rain day and I was going to be inside all day I would only have the dinette and the bed to relax, not good." I ventured further and found the Lance, it has two easy chairs with a small table that swivels instead of a traditional dinette and I find this much more comfortable for an indoor day. It also has the all season package to protect the holding tanks from prolonged and/or below freezing temps, just peace of mind. Whatever your thinking of choosing, do spend some time in it getting that all day stuck inside feel. Have fun and what a great adventure to share with your family!

LargeMarge 08-05-2019 09:56 PM

Shall we presume this's Washington The State?

For those few months, rent.

You are unlikely to be with them every moment.

JMCherry 08-25-2019 01:45 PM

So I am a little late to the party. Just catching up on all my RVing newsletters, etc. My husband and I both RV. We were looking at your parameters. Why donít you consider a self-contained truck/truck camper? Otherwise, for me, I would go with a smaller Class C. I agree with your comment on the Roadtrek, yuck on the wet bathroom. We always buy used. Look on RVTrader.com. Good luck. I would love to hear what you decided upon.


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