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-   -   Flooring Remodel Questions for Class A (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f258/flooring-remodel-questions-for-class-a-480189.html)

C5c5 03-07-2020 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rodekyll (Post 5176019)

Large, rigid areas, excessive anchor points, and brittle materials don't lend to that goal.

Could you explain what excessive anchor points means?

rodekyll 03-07-2020 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by C5c5 (Post 5176152)
Could you explain what excessive anchor points means?

Too many screws through the decking -- chairs and such bolted through the floor, seatbelt anchors, cabinet weight on the floor, etc -- anything that keeps the floor from floating -- is an anchor. There are going to be some necessary anchor points, but you don't want a lot. One way to reduce them is to cut a much larger hole in the flooring than the bolt (say -- seatbelt anchor) requires. That allows the floor to float around the anchor. My original floor had the driver/copilot seat bolted to the subfloor and the flooring laid around it.

If the left side moves and the right side can't you can split/buckle/spring it. Plywood over plywood makes for a rigid deck that can't move with the motion of the chassis. It can damage the subfloor joists. Flooring over plywood (or whatever paneled subfloor you've got) can move independently of each other, and the flooring itself can shift and "wave". There should be randomly-occurring little areas where the floor creaks with your weight as the layers shift against each other.

There are a lot of internet videos explaining this better than I can -- they're where I learned this stuff for my own floor, I'm not a flooring professional. As with anything on the internet, don't stop with the first thing you read/watch. There are different learned opinions and techniques out there. Find the one that best suits your situation.

Darin1960 03-07-2020 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by C5c5 (Post 5169439)
Greetings!

I was wondering what general practices I need to keep in mind when I replace my Class A flooring.

Currently it is wood and carpet with a plywood subfloor.

I want to completely replace it with plywood and apply a nice finish to it.

My questions so far:

1. What is the best way to obtain as seemless a look as possible between the laid plywood panels? A relative of mind has a stained plywood floor and I think it looks fantastic. The only thing I do not like is how you can see all the edges. Is it possible to get a seamless look, if so how?

2. What kind of things do I need to do overall for the plywood floor when installing to prevent breakage from twisting & torsion of the coach?

Is installing it as a floating floor recommended - yes or no? Advantages vs disadvantages?

3. How much insulation is best to install under it, and what kind?

4. Is a vapor barrier of some kind needed under the floor?

5. I am tossing around the idea of installing heated flooring elements under the plywood to keep the floor nice and warm during the winter. Is this a bad idea for plywood?

I might think of more questions as I explore this more!

Not trying to be difficult in any way but you did start this thread by asking what general practices to keep in mind when replacing class a flooring but your idea is a bit beyond the general practice and several folks have offered suggestions that are tried and proven.

Not exactly sure what you are looking for because in 1st post you mentioned a relatives floor being stained , later you mentioned painting your floor. As stated , you will not be able to have a seamless floor with plywood be it stained or painted. Although I am totally against the idea I am about to tell you , this will probably be the closest you will ever come to having a seamless wood floor stained or painted.There is a company that sells wood veneer in sheets as large as 4ft by 10 ft.

These sheets can be glued down and you could limit seems according to your floorplan , and the seems would be as minimal as your fitting skills permit .Also with gluing it down you you have no nails. The veneer is very thin and I have doubts as to how it will handle normal foot traffic and the time and effort to come close to a near seamless floor would be quite overwhelming I am afraid.

If you want to check it out, the company is Wisewood ,if you want find it, google large wood veneer. Sorry to end this with a somewhat negative statement but I think you will not be happy with a plywood floor in any application except for an ole hunting cabin or shop of some sort.

Rkesselus 03-07-2020 07:57 PM

For joining plywood with a no joint look you need to make what is called a scarf joint and it has to be glued together under pressure which may be difficult in a motor home. The process is to select two pieces that have the same grain pattern. Lay the two pieces together and then you mark the top piece with a two inch line from the joint and then the bottom piece with the same dimension line. your then sand both mating edges from the two incline to the end of the piece to make a angle and the same thing to the other piece, The two angle pieces then fit together and are glued under pressure. The result will be a joint that does not show. It is labor intensive but it will work. Google how to make a scarf joint and you will get several spots the describe it with pictures.

C5c5 03-07-2020 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rodekyll (Post 5176252)
Too many screws through the decking -- chairs and such bolted through the floor, seatbelt anchors, cabinet weight on the floor, etc -- anything that keeps the floor from floating -- is an anchor. There are going to be some necessary anchor points, but you don't want a lot. One way to reduce them is to cut a much larger hole in the flooring than the bolt (say -- seatbelt anchor) requires. That allows the floor to float around the anchor. My original floor had the driver/copilot seat bolted to the subfloor and the flooring laid around it.



If the left side moves and the right side can't you can split/buckle/spring it. Plywood over plywood makes for a rigid deck that can't move with the motion of the chassis. It can damage the subfloor joists. Flooring over plywood (or whatever paneled subfloor you've got) can move independently of each other, and the flooring itself can shift and "wave". There should be randomly-occurring little areas where the floor creaks with your weight as the layers shift against each other.



There are a lot of internet videos explaining this better than I can -- they're where I learned this stuff for my own floor, I'm not a flooring professional. As with anything on the internet, don't stop with the first thing you read/watch. There are different learned opinions and techniques out there. Find the one that best suits your situation.

TY for the explanation.

I am doing the internet research as you suggested.

C5c5 03-07-2020 09:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darin1960 (Post 5176320)

Not exactly sure what you are looking for because in 1st post you mentioned a relatives floor being stained , later you mentioned painting your floor.

I am brainstorming different flooring ideas, plywood being my favorite so far.

I definitely have considered the popular & conventional flooring options such as tiles, vinyl, etc. The problem with them is that they mostly have the "tiled" and small square/rectangular look. I do not want that and am looking for options that will give the best large seamless or smooth look.

Your input and ideas are a good help! Thank you.

C5c5 03-07-2020 09:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rkesselus (Post 5176367)
For joining plywood with a no joint look you need to make what is called a scarf joint and it has to be glued together under pressure which may be difficult in a motor home. The process is to select two pieces that have the same grain pattern. Lay the two pieces together and then you mark the top piece with a two inch line from the joint and then the bottom piece with the same dimension line. your then sand both mating edges from the two incline to the end of the piece to make a angle and the same thing to the other piece, The two angle pieces then fit together and are glued under pressure. The result will be a joint that does not show. It is labor intensive but it will work. Google how to make a scarf joint and you will get several spots the describe it with pictures.

Interesting. I will check it out. Thank you!


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