iRV2 Forums

iRV2 Forums (https://www.irv2.com/forums/)
-   Ford Motorhome Chassis Forum (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f23/)
-   -   Breaking in Rebuilt Motor (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f23/breaking-in-rebuilt-motor-506747.html)

WineLuvrs 09-15-2020 12:28 PM

Breaking in Rebuilt Motor
 
I am having a rebuilt motor installed, as the original failed at 60K miles, (detailed in another thread).

My question is what is the break in procedure, if any, for a Ford rebuilt F53 motor?

wolfe10 09-15-2020 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WineLuvrs (Post 5441666)
I am having a rebuilt motor installed, as the original failed at 60K miles, (detailed in another thread).

My question is what is the break in procedure, if any, for a Ford rebuilt F53 motor?


Assume this is a Ford V10.



What caused the failure-- VERY rare for this engine????


What break-in did the rebuilder recommend???

450Donn 09-15-2020 01:52 PM

Kind of hard to brake in a motor in a motor home. But, IMHO I would go real easy for the first 500 miles. Change the oil and filter at 500 miles and go.

chboone 09-15-2020 11:38 PM

Follow the engine rebuilders recommendations for your warranty.

ga traveler 09-16-2020 03:48 PM

The old school way was no hard throttle for five hundred miles. No high speed for five hundred miles. No steady speed for five hundred miles. Vary speed for the first five hundred miles. Go from 40 to 55. Let off and do that over and over again. Then take it easy for the next 1500 miles.

LETMGROW 09-16-2020 04:06 PM

Drive it like you would normally drive it. Just don't run any Stop light Grand Prixs. You will be just fine.
Lynn

tiffy2000 09-17-2020 06:26 AM

rebuild
 
I wouldn't baby it, I assume the rebuild has a warranty if it is going t break you want it to break during the warranty period. Back in the day when I rebuilt motors we ran them hard to seat the rings and wear in the cylinders properly. A motor that is not run hard will wear the cylinders different than one that is run hard from the beginning. A race car driver or dragster doesn't get a chance to baby the engine.

That is my 2 cents :)

sibe 09-17-2020 08:17 AM

the first 30 minutes is critical,, rebulder or installer should have dome that procedure,, other wise drive it... IMO I would take it for an hour or so spin, easy on some roads not to hammer it,, let it sit, check for fluids and leaks once more ..

If I was going on a long trip 1000 miles or so out of the gate, I would change oil and filter to waht the rebilder or oem spec. this way and assembley lubes and crap from rebuild is taken out..

I build many of motors, some times I have a hospital enviornment , sometimes it is budget refresh on a vinatge and things can be so so.. 95% of the time we are so clean and careful especialy on todays toght tolerance especially in the powersports stuff..

Normally after I do 3 heat cycles and sessions, I tell customers run it like you stole it.. but that is me makng sure.

bruce91 09-17-2020 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tiffy2000 (Post 5443756)
I wouldn't baby it, I assume the rebuild has a warranty if it is going t break you want it to break during the warranty period. Back in the day when I rebuilt motors we ran them hard to seat the rings and wear in the cylinders properly. A motor that is not run hard will wear the cylinders different than one that is run hard from the beginning. A race car driver or dragster doesn't get a chance to baby the engine.

That is my 2 cents :)

Breaking in the rings right off is important. The few motorcycle motors i rebuilt i found an article (which i can't find) that had a ring break in procedure.

Best i can remember is:

From a roll give it some good throttle up to about 50mph.
Let off the gas and let it come down to 10mph.
repeat this 5 or so times and the rings are seated.

Theory is the strong throttle pressures the rings to the honed cylinder and the coasting to 10mph brings oil to the cylinder walls.

Biggest challenge was finding a clear road to do this.

99dart 09-17-2020 05:35 PM

Pretty much do anything, but don't baby it. Like said, seating the rings first thing is critical! Go ahead and accelerate hard from a stop, then back off and cruise a bit. If you can find a twisty-turny road where you can accelerate, then let of for the corner, accelerate again, then let off. You get the idea. And, like said, change the oil soon. I run the initial start up oil around the block, get it up to operating temp, then return home to check again for oil or coolant leaks. That's when I dump the start up oil. That gets any dirt/debris and metal out of there pronto. Use a NON synthetic oil and good Wix/NAPA gold (made by Wix) filter. I use Castrol 10w-30 for the next 2 oil changes. First at 1000-1500 miles and again at 1000-1500. After that you should be golden. Run whatever oil you like. I do run synthetic oils in all my rigs. And, especially in my V-10 motorhome engines. I like the extra protection. Castrol edge is my go to oil. Hope she purrs like a kitten for you! :thumb:

clifford j 09-17-2020 05:48 PM

I like the comment,,, run it like you stole it :) Tiffy 2000 said " I wouldn't baby it " . The farmer down the road with his new John Deere jumped in the seat and started plowing ,,Break in ?? don't think so. But service it like the rebuilder said

CLIFFORD

Geo19Irv 09-17-2020 05:58 PM

Breaking in
 
0 - 50 miles keep revs low, very speed up and down, change oil and filter at 50 miles.
50 - 500 miles No hi revs, very speed, change oil & filter at 500 miles.
500 - 1000 miles No high revs, change oil & filter again.
over 1000 miles run as normal, have fun.
:cool::thumb::dance:

TeJay 09-18-2020 07:30 AM

No hard evidence of what I heard from several engine builders many years ago. The use of synthetic oils changed the idea of engine breaking in procedures. Apparently the synthetic oils reduces friction enough to not allow the rings to effectively seat as is required to happen on a rebuild.

I remember one of my Dads vehicles (1958 Buick I think) had a buzzer that went off if he went over 50 MPH at least for the first 500 miles. They also had break in oil used for those first miles.

In our lifetime of buying new vehicles (probably 10-15) I don't ever recall any one advising us on any type of break in procedure.

This opinion is just my observations after having gone through the massive changes following 1980. Prior to 1980 and the much better metering of fuel delivery the fuel was controlled by carburetors that ran a 6:1 choked mixture for start up. That added a lot of un-burned fuel which washed the oil from the cylinder walls until full warm up sealed the rings and burned the fuel much more efficiently. A great deal of engine wear was present due to the poor managing of fuel. That translated into engines that seldom lasted into the 60,000 to 100,000 mile range.

When better fuel management came into play starting in 1980 and progressing until today that added to the longevity of engines. Add to that the use of aluminum engines with cast iron cylinder inserts and we have engines that easily reach the 150,000 and above miles.

I have never rebuilt an aluminum engine so I don't know what they are doing to the new aluminum engines. I do know and understand why they use the torque to yield bolts.

My educated guess is the better fuel management also removed the real need for engine break in periods. I'm sure todays engines are made to much tighter tolerances. With the addition of torque to yield bolts giving the engines a much better secure fit also adds to the quality and longevity.

I've never been a brand specific oil type of person. All oils have to meet the SAE and API standards so how much different can they end up being? I am however a Mobil 1 advocate primarily based on their time as a synthetic oil developer. They weren't the first to develop synthetic oils but the first to recommend 25,000 oil change intervals. And they really meant it. That idea was way, way ahead of its time and after a few years they rescinded it. No man worth his salt would ever allow oil to stay in his vehicles engine for 25,000 miles.

sibe 09-19-2020 05:24 PM

.Tejay.. I hear ya but from what I did in 1975 with motors and oils is a bit different from when I do a new subaru or ford truck etc.. I dont do many as it is a passtime,, now motorcyles I still hit heavy with junior and his gig...

I was told by a good friend and research science guy as petrochemist etc.. guy has 7 doctrines.. and can explain stuff in layman terms.. my head swells after 4 hours on phone..

BUt one thing he always explained to is Dino oil . brite stock etc is the cream of oils and a base .. Dino motor oils all have additives.. from detergents to friction modifiers to viscosity stablers etc .. most additives are synthetic of some sort or cracked and blended.. old school non detergent oils are mostly oils with little else.....pre 70's

The oil base stocks is what they synthesise.. the better the oil sometimes it is harder to clone.. or costly.. the good part of the syn oils is they can be tweeked to have unique properties like pour points etc.. Then that syn oil we just made gets hit with addtives like the dyn oils..
There is alot alot more to syn bases. esters, etc etc.,,... points is not all syn oils are slippery or better at friction.. depend,, so we talk break in etc.. many factors,,

New motor metals are a bit different that the old v8's I would say the ford 460 is a bit old school but the v10 is a bit more modern metalurgy.. Oils have changed ..to be fuel saving,, many by viscosity and stable as a thinner fluid.. the thinner film is less drag etc.. mordern machining and surface finish is superior to years ago,,

Stuff i do in power sports mimics new vehicles.. The metals are better, fit , finish is nice,, yes oils are better in some cases.. Once run and heat cycled a few times they are ready to run..

When I build a 390 or 428 ford or a 396 for my buddys.. It is old school.. Brad penn break in oil, for a dyno run , drain, then old school zinc added oils... Full power pulls and it is ready to go.. NO wally oil or modern "SN" or Rotella ever for these animals.. even in a full roller build, i get the willys..

My race Honda CRF450 single mx motors.. full syn, 10w50... run it like you stole,, but life is less than 100 hours in extreme use.. blah blah..

Ok I running off topic but new oils, new motors , new thinking.. IMO it is a truck motor, oem designed to haul and go,, rebuilt .. first 500 , I would not pull rockies with trailer on a 90 degreeday,, but after an oil change and 400-501+ miles,, have fun..

Rebuilt motor already has work hardened and heat cycled components. the new stuff replaced adapts and burnishes in fast...


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:19 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.