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-   -   Blown diesel engine (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f258/blown-diesel-engine-533735.html)

Big berd 05-06-2021 04:26 PM

Big berd
 
I had a 650 in a Monaco executive 45ft lost 2 cylinders the head lost a trip to Alaska took the heart out of us we had cumins come to our house and fix it at my house in the garage lost the turbo also the bill was 35000.00 you can have the mobile cummins guy to come and look at it towing was an issue because of the height of the coach on a flat bed to get under the bridges that is the only way to tow I believe to move a 45 ft rv with out damage. I believe that the Cummins field operation could look at that and give you some direction.
That moter I had was a 2009 also good luck my friend

lockinload 05-06-2021 05:51 PM

It's pretty irritating when people post for help and then go MIA. I have got so much help from many on this sight and try and help those looking for solutions. It kind of pisses me off when OPs do this. Maybe the mods should just lock a thread when the OP disappears, so those in the know can help others instead of having their time wasted.

craigav 05-06-2021 06:20 PM

Keep in mind that there are certainly plenty of valid reasons why someone may unintentionally go MIA for a while after asking a question, no need to be overly irritated over things like that. For me, I just hope that the op is OK, he has been a member since 2013, unlike some others who join, ask a question on post #1, and then never comes back, that is a bit different. ~Craig

dmctlc 05-06-2021 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by craigav (Post 5741048)
Keep in mind that there are certainly plenty of valid reasons why someone may unintentionally go MIA for a while after asking a question, no need to be overly irritated over things like that. For me, I just hope that the op is OK, he has been a member since 2013, unlike some others who join, ask a question on post #1, and then never comes back, that is a bit different. ~Craig

I have to agree perhaps the OP is busy working with someone to fix it or at least get it home. For folks to criticize someone for not getting back online when its obvious he has bigger issues to take care of then all I got to say is don't read the post! Like someone pointed out he's been a member since 2013 so let show some respect. This forum isn't for folks to throw criticism but offer advice. Let's stick to the program.:thumb:

Ray,IN 05-06-2021 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dmctlc (Post 5741245)
I have to agree perhaps the OP is busy working with someone to fix it or at least get it home. For folks to criticize someone for not getting back online when its obvious he has bigger issues to take care of then all I got to say is don't read the post! Like someone pointed out he's been a member since 2013 so let show some respect. This forum isn't for folks to throw criticism but offer advice. Let's stick to the program.:thumb:

:goodjob::iagree:

rvtips 05-06-2021 10:24 PM

What does this mean [ Re and re the motor ] ?

Arch Hoagland 05-06-2021 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rvtips (Post 5741317)
What does this mean [ Re and re the motor ] ?

Remove and repair.

fitzjohnfan 05-06-2021 11:17 PM

I was just playing around on Google a came across this place. Maybe they could find an engine and swap here.

https://usedrvparts.visonerv.com/cgi...-partingout.pl

Piros1 05-06-2021 11:18 PM

First I read all the post, it would suck to be in this position. Sorry for the OP and I surely hope he is getting is situation resolved in a reasonable manor.

I wonder his rig is and what engine? I seen where some posted it was a 3126 Cat. If that is what he has a really doubt it truly was a runaway unless he over ran it down a very steep grade and just over reved the engine. I own several of these in heavier trucks than most coaches with this engine and some approached 23,000 hours of run time, (thatís equivalent to approximately 1,000,000 miles) way more than we see on a Motorhome and have never seen one runaway or over rev do to a worn turbo. That was a common problem on the old Detroit two strokes but not so much on the newer engines from Cummins and Cat. Detroitís were supper charged and they had an emergency air shut off flap you could pull if it it started to run away. You donít get that with a turbo, maybe I should say not impossible but very very rare.

Hopefully the OP comes back and fills us in. Iím sure he is pretty bummed out. I wish him the best.

BobJones 05-06-2021 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rvtips (Post 5741317)
What does this mean [ Re and re the motor ] ?

Remove & Replace

tinman 55 05-07-2021 12:24 AM

Im new to the diesel scene so please forgive my ignorance. I had not heard of diesel runaway until seeing this post, so I looked it up and still really don't understand how it happens. I guess it's the extra addition of fuel or oil that causes the continued running of the engine, but, isn't the regulation of fuel governed by the ECM? And, wouldn't the ECM prevent that extra addition of fuel to the engine?
Also, is there anything I should keep watch for to prevent this from happening to my coach.
Thanks everyone,

AnotherMike 05-07-2021 01:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tinman 55 (Post 5741394)
Im new to the diesel scene so please forgive my ignorance. I had not heard of diesel runaway until seeing this post, so I looked it up and still really don't understand how it happens. I guess it's the extra addition of fuel or oil that causes the continued running of the engine, but, isn't the regulation of fuel governed by the ECM? And, wouldn't the ECM prevent that extra addition of fuel to the engine?
Also, is there anything I should keep watch for to prevent this from happening to my coach.
Thanks everyone,

I do two-way radio and some computer networking, so I have very little hands-on experience with diesels. But I can answer your question...
The one diesel I worked on used a solenoid driven shutoff valve in the line between the engine and the fuel source... either the tank or the fuel pump.

In a gas engine you shut it off by turning off the ignition. Diesel engines do not have an ignition system. The only way to shut off a diesel engine is to shut off the air or the fuel.

Now take the situation of a blown oil seal in the turbo... where the leaky seal allows lube oil to be pumped into the air intake of the engine... and acting as diesel fuel. The engine will run until there is no lube oil. The engine speed will depend on the feed rate of the lube oil. No ECM involved in this "fuel" supply.

Likewise a "dusted" engine... where the dirty / dusty air it has inhaled has gotten past the air filter and scored the cylinder walls, and the lube oil is getting past the piston rings... This is again acting as diesel fuel. If the amount of lube oil getting past the rings (frequently called "blowby") is enough then it will continue to run until there is no more lube oil. Again, no ECM involved in this "fuel" supply.

In either case the closure of the fuel cutoff solenoid valve will have no effect. At that point the only way to the engine down is to cut off the air intake. Back in the 1970s I watched a mechanic in a diesel shop lay a phone book across the turbo intake (the air cleaner was not on the engine) of a bulldozer engine, and a few years later saw a truck driver take his jacket off and zip it up across the air cleaner intake...

Generally speaking, the intake air flow from somewhere outside of the MH to the air inlet of the turbo (or engine) almost always has to make a few turns to fit into the engine compartment. That run always contains an air filter assembly somewhere. Each turn usually involves a rubber sleeve & large clamps (of some kind) to connect to the next piece of air pipe or air duct. Plus there will be another flex sleeve to connect to the turbo. A damaged air filter, a crack in the filter box, a hole in any of the air tubes, or a tear or hole in one of these connecting sleeves can result in dirty/dusty air being sucked into the engine. And any one of those air leaks could prevent the jacket or other plug from starving the engine of air.

You might want to read these threads:
https: // www.irv2.com/forums/f123/dusted-cummins-engine-473871.html

https: // www.irv2.com/forums/f123/urgent-wheres-my-oil-going-202637.html
That second one is very long (51 pages!), but VERY educational (and a good read, "piker" is a good writer).

Mike

Chargersrt8 05-07-2021 06:16 AM

He posted that the engine and trans is for sale and the rig is at his permanent site for life. Engine is dead, he is alive.

Kountry_star 05-07-2021 06:44 AM

Just did a couple of google searchs. Lots of low mileage RV diesel engines out there. Some quite reasonable. Betting you could find one close by and an independent shop that could remove and replace it for a reasonable cost. You still likely to be out a min of 9-11k.

Know you most likely know that by now just wanted to remind you to check / replace the intercooler. A friend had an engine die on him out in AZ. Newer truck / out of warranty. Debated back and forth new or salvage. Found an engine out of a truck that cargo had caught fire and burned the cab with minor fire damage to the engine. Very low mileage. Got it all replaced, fuel lines bleed. He said it fired right up ran a few minutes then started making a lot of bad noises. Long story shortened. Trashed Turbo bits and pieses where still in the inbound side of inter cooler. Pulled intake more extra bits. Pulled the head, Started looking for a replacement engine. Luckly there second choice engine was still available.

Hoping your back on the road shortly and at a semi reasonable price.


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