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-   -   TPMS sensors inside the tire or on the valve stems - Which is better? (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f258/tpms-sensors-inside-the-tire-or-on-the-valve-stems-which-is-better-544891.html)

R.Wold 07-10-2021 09:05 PM

TPMS sensors inside the tire or on the valve stems - Which is better?
 
I know there have been countless discussions about TPMS and I almost bought a TST system recently with external sensors, but I haven’t seen this aspect of the topic discussed, other than vulnerability to theft, which I’m not worried about.

Im about to get new tires so if inside-the-tire sensors are better now is the time to find out.

Also if this is the case which brand(s) are preferred, and why?

Thanks and my apologies if I missed this aspect of this topic in earlier discussions.

Outbound 07-10-2021 09:19 PM

Not familiar with inside sensors but how do you change their batteries?

R.Wold 07-10-2021 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Outbound (Post 5826627)
Not familiar with inside sensors but how do you change their batteries?

Supposed to last as long as the tire but if Iím going 7 years that could be pushing it.

PandS 07-10-2021 10:43 PM

On the valve stems for me. YMMV...-Paul

scbwr 07-11-2021 05:24 AM

On the valve EEZRV TPMS works well on my rig. I have sensors on the Malibu and I didn't need a repeater. If you purchase EEZ sensor kit, program them with the sensors on the vehicle as it is much easier and faster.

triplewide 07-11-2021 06:19 AM

I have used TST for past 6 years. My 2 cents worth:


External Cons:


Susceptible to water intrusion from degraded or lost o rings (replaced all after 3 years)


Batteries last about 18 months ( I now change all mine every spring)


One additional joint in the system that could leak.


Non flow though require removal to adjust air pressure.



External Pros:


Accessible with out removing tire and rim.


Can be transferred to another vehicle/coach (have done this twice)





For me if internal batteries would last 7-8 years that would be the way to go (the internals on my 2017 Jeep are still working, doubt they will make 7 years ). No maintenance required, easier to use. Would be more likely to use if full timing in a DP that I planned to keep for 7+ years.

JDaveB 07-11-2021 06:38 AM

The externally-mounted donít accurately report tire temps. They are always within a few degrees of ambient temperature

Dave

The Brews Cruise 07-11-2021 07:26 AM

I'm also in the market for a good TPMS for my coach and toad. My tires have date codes less than 2 years old, so not time to change the tires yet. If I were changing tires, I would check into the internal systems. Internal systems have been successfully used for at least the last 8 or 10 years in cars and trucks with no problems. On our Chevy Equinox toad, new sensors were installed when I had new tires installed. I asked the dealer how long the batteries last, and was told that I would need new tires before I needed new batteries. I don't have either system yet, but I would think the internal systems would perform well and would have fewer potential problems.

caninecop 07-11-2021 09:38 AM

I have had TST for many years, also have had EEZ TPMS. I agree with this post earlier ďEEZ sensor kit, program them with the sensors on the vehicle as it is much easier and fasterĒ. I now use TST with flow-through sensors with the color monitor. I have found the color monitor is much easier to read, now that EEZ has a color monitor, if I was looking for a TPMS it would be a hard decision on which to use. I am seriously think about going to internal sensors the next time I get new tires.

R.Wold 07-11-2021 11:34 AM

So far most of what Iíve seen are exterior mounted sensors. Are there preferred brands that have internal sensors? Iíd like to look at a few. TST seems to be well regarded and has an internal sensor kit but the sensors mounts with a giant hose clamp affair around the center of the rim. Seems like this would cause a balancing issue. Are they all mounted like that?

Crasher 07-11-2021 08:55 PM

The main thing that will affect tire temperature is tire pressure. I have had the TST system for 10+ years. If the parameter limits are set correctly, the pressure alarm will give plenty of notice of a problem developing before a tire failure. If a leak occurs, the low pressure alarm will alert the operator of the problem. I had one instance where the valve stem of a trailer tire blew off. With all of the weight on that side of the trailer on the remaining tire, it's pressure increased rapidly due to the overload and the high pressure alarm sounded. I stopped, put on the spare and drove on. If I have an issue with a sensor, it's easy to change. Not sure how I would deal with and internal sensor problem.

caninecop 07-12-2021 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crasher (Post 5827900)
The main thing that will affect tire temperature is tire pressure. I have had the TST system for 10+ years. If the parameter limits are set correctly, the pressure alarm will give plenty of notice of a problem developing before a tire failure. If a leak occurs, the low pressure alarm will alert the operator of the problem. I had one instance where the valve stem of a trailer tire blew off. With all of the weight on that side of the trailer on the remaining tire, it's pressure increased rapidly due to the overload and the high pressure alarm sounded. I stopped, put on the spare and drove on. If I have an issue with a sensor, it's easy to change. Not sure how I would deal with and internal sensor problem.

Your post about TST giving a warning about a slow leak was right on, just returned from a 4500-mile trip. Outside of Dallas got a warning about low tire pressure, pulled into a safe place to check the tire. I could not find where the tire was leaking, added air to bring back up to correct level, then headed for our next stop. I wonít go into all the details on trying to fix the slow leak. The bottom line I had to get the tire replaced. I am very thankful for the warning from TST without it, the outcome might have been way different.

triplewide 07-12-2021 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by caninecop (Post 5828319)
Your post about TST giving a warning about a slow leak was right on, just returned from a 4500-mile trip. Outside of Dallas got a warning about low tire pressure, pulled into a safe place to check the tire. I could not find where the tire was leaking, added air to bring back up to correct level, then headed for our next stop. I wonít go into all the details on trying to fix the slow leak. The bottom line I had to get the tire replaced. I am very thankful for the warning from TST without it, the outcome might have been way different.




Internal or external, TPMS is worth having in my opinion.

R.Wold 07-12-2021 02:11 PM

At this point IĎm beginning to think that it doesnít matter if the internal sensors are more accurate (temp or pressure) than external sensors because what you are really concerned with is a change in pressure, or a significant variation in temp.

So that being the case and of course all the other reasons given, Iíll probably just opt for externals. This will also allow me to do it now rather than wait for new tires, which is probably a good idea as these tires are entering their last year of service.

pasdad1 07-12-2021 04:12 PM

Internals are better because they are protected from damage due to accident or vandalism. They also donít need regular battery replacement. I would have them if I had them available when tires were replaced.

MoCoTom 07-12-2021 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDaveB (Post 5826848)
The externally-mounted donít accurately report tire temps. They are always within a few degrees of ambient temperature

Dave

I have the TST system and a couple weeks ago I had a rising tire temp on the left rear. I pulled over when possible and found the brake caliper was seizing causing the brakes to heat up. The tire monitor is what alerted me to this problem so I will have to disagree with your statement.
Tom

GypsyR 07-12-2021 06:56 PM

About everything OEM these days has TPMS as part of their mandated vehicle stability systems. I've noted that though there are different implementations, ALL of them are internal. Leading me to look at the external versions as something of a kludge.
Those OEM style sensors tend to have the battery last 6-7 years easily. I've seen some go ten years. I'm kind of drawn toward things that require no attention at all for that kind of length of time.

R.Wold 07-12-2021 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pasdad1 (Post 5828866)
Internals are better because they are protected from damage due to accident or vandalism. They also don’t need regular battery replacement. I would have them if I had them available when tires were replaced.


Quote:

Originally Posted by GypsyR (Post 5829076)
About everything OEM these days has TPMS as part of their mandated vehicle stability systems. I've noted that though there are different implementations, ALL of them are internal. Leading me to look at the external versions as something of a kludge.
Those OEM style sensors tend to have the battery last 6-7 years easily. I've seen some go ten years. I'm kind of drawn toward things that require no attention at all for that kind of length of time.

Just when I thought I’d made up my mind.....:facepalm:

TonyDi 07-12-2021 10:21 PM

I have been using TST sensors for over 12 years and not had a problem with them. My batteries last two years and are easy to replace. If you opt for internal sensors the cost to remove the tire and install the sensors can wind up costing almost as much as the TPMS did.

GypsyR 07-13-2021 09:49 AM

Well but IF your sensor batteries have about the same lifespan as your tires....
But that's a big if. I wouldn't be inclined at all to believe what the manufacturers say about them. But I would believe input from fellow forum members if one were to post up a poll like "How long did YOUR TPMS batteries last?" Hint, hint.

TXiceman 07-13-2021 10:47 AM

TST TPMS on the valve stems for over 8 years and easy battery replacement. The inside mounted units will provide better theft protection and more accurate temperature reading.

Ken

tomato 07-13-2021 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MoCoTom (Post 5828979)
I have the TST system and a couple weeks ago I had a rising tire temp on the left rear. I pulled over when possible and found the brake caliper was seizing causing the brakes to heat up. The tire monitor is what alerted me to this problem so I will have to disagree with your statement.
Tom

Tom: I am close to ordering a set of the external sensors. Do they read near ambient temp or are the closer to tire air temp? My fifth wheel had internals, and ran around 130-degrees on the highway during hot days as a point of reference. They alerted me to a brake problem as well at one point.

sirpurrcival 07-13-2021 04:51 PM

I use the external type and I find that they measure the inside temperature reasonably well. I originally bought this type to go on my Class A but when I moved to a truck and travel trailer, I just brought them along and reconfigured. A big plus in my book. Internal sensors are a set them and forget them kind of thing and I will admit that the external type seem to go through batteries far more often than I think they should It always seems like there is one. And as mentioned they do often have this ridiculously tiny O ring that can easily break when you unscrew to change the battery. I always keep a few on spare in case I need to replace one. However, I wasn't going to dismount and mount all my tires in order to have an internal monitor. Nor do I think I will likely keep my rig that long (maybe 5 years). I don't want to re-up for a new set every time I change. Hence the preference for the external type.

Ray,IN 07-13-2021 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by R.Wold (Post 5826632)
Supposed to last as long as the tire but if I’m going 7 years that could be pushing it.

TST sells both types; the inside model is quite expensive IMO.

swduns 07-13-2021 10:23 PM

Reminds me of Robert Frost Poem …. Fire and Ice

I got new tires and put in internal TST sensors
Had 6 months and numerous trips … so far so good
Used stem cap TST sensors on Toad. Had one rubber stem spread/fail
Taking cap off to air tires is a pain and each time is an opportunity for failure

Internal are more expensive. If batteries fail then it will cost me
But less hassle than stem cap sensors.

Either way will work. If u can afford internal I think their less hassle
But if I had unlimited funds I’d buy a Prevost with all the bells & whistles …

MoCoTom 07-14-2021 07:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tomato (Post 5830293)
Tom: I am close to ordering a set of the external sensors. Do they read near ambient temp or are the closer to tire air temp? My fifth wheel had internals, and ran around 130-degrees on the highway during hot days as a point of reference. They alerted me to a brake problem as well at one point.

tomato
The TST monitors are quite accurate at reporting tire pressure. I'm not going to argue they report exact tire temp because I'm sure they don't. What they will do is alert you to a given tire that is out of parameters with the others. For example when my brake was dragging I saw the tire temp was 15 degrees above the others so you know there is a problem.
Tom
PS-Semper fi

R.Wold 07-15-2021 10:04 AM

While considering this question and researching tires I found that Continental has their own built in TPMS for many of their comercial tires.

Anyone know anything about that? Sounds great in their website, but in practice....?

https://www.continental-tires.com/tr...tinental-itire

https://www.continental-specialty.co...ipressurecheck

Sundancer268 07-18-2021 04:05 PM

I have had my coach now for 12 years and I have replaced the batteries on my TST external sensors every couple of years, I run the external Non-Flow-Threw type on the coach and the 2019 Jeep with no issues. The Idea that the internal batteries will last 7-10 years is what worries me on the Jeep, I tend to keep my vehicles 15-20 years and just don't relish having to buy new sensors for the Jeep. Changing batteries on the external sensors is a no brainer and the O-Rings are easily replaced and if installed using Silicon Grease last a long time. As for theft, I removed the theft deterrence covers on the coach and left them on the Jeep when we travel as that is in locations where kids could get curious and want to check them out. A good pair of pliers will remove the sensor even with the caps on so I figure they are just a deterrent to walking away on their own.

VinceB 07-18-2021 04:12 PM

I've been using TST for 12-15 years. They have saved my bacon 3x. Pricey but way cheaper than being stuck or getting damage to your rig.

Peace of mind is priceless - the trailer and toad are too far away to know what is going on back there.

The book says to remove the sending units from the tire so they stop transmitting which allows the batteries to last longer - doing this, I get 3-4 years out of batteries. It is somewhat of a PITA but easier than changing batteries on the older sending units. I took a silver sharpie and marked which goes where.

I recently replaced my first sending unit this spring - water intrusion. I was happy to see they updated their sensors and now the batteries are much easier to replace. The new sending units are still compatible with my old B&W receiver. They do take a different battery so now I need to carry another size as I replace ASAP when they do die.

I'm 36'+ and tow a 22' trailer or my Wrangler 4-door and found a repeater isn't necessary. I have one for sale cheap if anyone needs one.

When I tow the trailer with the pickup, I don't install the sending units on the truck (has internal factory) but I do install on the trailer tires. The receiver doesn't seem to care that there is no signal from the 6 that go on the motor home.

I would never travel without the system and spare batteries.

keastab 07-18-2021 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDaveB (Post 5826848)
The externally-mounted donít accurately report tire temps. They are always within a few degrees of ambient temperature

Dave

I ahve no idea what tire monitoring system you have but my EEztire system is within 4 degrees of actual tire temps, it does lag a bit on initial trip start but catches up and stays current. I have had a low pressure tire alarm that went to heat alarm before the pressure got close to my low pressure alarm and saved the tire from damage.

msherw 07-18-2021 04:33 PM

We have stem-mounted RVi TPMS sensors that can easily be removed when they die and then be replaced. The onboard central hub reads the RV and the toad and as some say...the peace of mind is priceless.

RVi will replace any/all sensors for a flat $10 at end of life. RVi is the same company we use for our toad braking system.

JDaveB 07-18-2021 05:02 PM

Amazing

Dave

arcaguy 07-18-2021 05:18 PM

Just a couple of thoughts on external vs internal sensors. I had a 2008 F150 I sold a couple of years ago that had the original sensors and batteries so about 12 years on battery life. I also think that the internal sensors can have bigger batteries so they last longer. I'm not sure that the absolute temperature of the tire is nearly as important as any change in temperature, it seems that either style sensor would do OK at that. Just my dos centavos. Good luck whichever style you choose.

Ken Gluckman 07-18-2021 05:19 PM

I have had Valor internal sensors on my last two coaches and toads. They are excellent and, as stated above, there are advantages to internals. They are a bit more expensive, especially the installation cost, but if you are getting new tires anyway that wonít be a big deal.

If you are interested, contact:

Don Rigby

rigby.don@gmail.com

(800) 568-9188

He knows all about putting these on RVs and sells what you need. Good guy to work with. F

safwsu 07-18-2021 05:45 PM

Ditto from me. I did as noted.

Max Hubrich 07-18-2021 07:55 PM

TST identified my slow leak problem-
 
I'm addressing #12 thread, the slow leak issue, that the TST system identified, with this reply--

I also have a TST system, for many years now--- and I have devised a way to easily "Tighten" the seal on a very, very, slow leaking "Schrader valve"

Use a pair of "Schrader" valve "Jam nuts" to cure this slow leak issue, or hard to find leak. The valve stem "external tightening nut" can't cure this, many times, because the whole valve turns, without compressing this seal. This issue seems to come up when the temperature drops in winter time.

A very slow leaking valve can't be tighten most times, without the tire being removed, and "broken down", and then you have to put an "Allen Wrench" on/into the "inside part" of the "Schrader valve" to hold it firmly, while the external tightening nut is turned to compress the rubber seal--- to make it seal properly.

See my former thread, below.

https://www.irv2.com/forums/f84/schr...ts-482590.html

Works great for me. I made these little beauties on my lathe, at home, out of 9/16" hexagon, steel stock---

Someone also mentioned to use some old "Schrader valve nuts", if you can find them---- That'll work too---

It's an odd ball, old time thread size. You can find a "Schrader Valve" "threading tap" with a "Google" search----

https://www.amazon.com/8V1-32-Schrad...1W50M4QJ2DWJEM

I've had this annoying "slow leak" issue for years, that no one can seem to find with soap and water---

I've stopped all my slow leak issues, with the help of the TST system.

I check all the tire pressures in the early morning, before the sun hits any tire- Yeah---

:dance:

Happy, safe travels to everyone---
Max

motorboatvz 07-18-2021 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by R.Wold (Post 5828715)
At this point IĎm beginning to think that it doesnít matter if the internal sensors are more accurate (temp or pressure) than external sensors because what you are really concerned with is a change in pressure, or a significant variation in temp.

So that being the case and of course all the other reasons given, Iíll probably just opt for externals. This will also allow me to do it now rather than wait for new tires, which is probably a good idea as these tires are entering their last year of service.

I am with you one this one. I use them for a trend indicator. I check and air up my tires just before leaving on a trip of two to three weeks or about 2500 mile. Once set I just let my Tire Minder system tell what is going on with each tire. The pressure will always go up once the tire has be run a few mile and the temp will also change. But once they stop changing you can see all the pressures there in front of you and IF one of them starts to change you know you have a problem or if you are NOT watching the display it will alarm you to the fact. I just Upgraded to there A1AS system and it is working great. I use my MH to tow a Smart Car or a Flat bed trailer with my SUV on it and have not had any problems with the system. I just replace the battery's once a year but have gone 2 years. There older system was a little harder to use when driving because the buttons were small and to make it scroll after an alarm it was a little hard but the NEW system now show each tire and temp all at the same time without it scrolling. Plus IF you what to change from towing a car to a trailer you can just tell it that is what you are doing with out resetting each TPS sensor. I started using the Tire Minder system when I first got my 2014 Newmar Ventana 3436 and I think its one of the best things I have add to my coach..

dedobias 07-18-2021 09:07 PM

11 years
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GypsyR (Post 5829708)
Well but IF your sensor batteries have about the same lifespan as your tires....
But that's a big if. I wouldn't be inclined at all to believe what the manufacturers say about them. But I would believe input from fellow forum members if one were to post up a poll like "How long did YOUR TPMS batteries last?" Hint, hint.

I have a 2010 Impala and one of 4 has a battery starting to go.

Blackey Cole 07-19-2021 03:50 AM

I went with exterior since my toad has internal. If I could have gotten a system that would work with mt 2020 Jeep Jl I would have went internal but none exists. So it depends on if you monitoring more than a single vehicle. But most will not be. Since most have a tow vehicle and a trailer or a Motorhome and either a toad or a trailer. Iíve blown many trailer tires when I was younger and didnít have the money to replace the tires on schedule or. A way to monitor them for heat. Now Iím in a better place and ordered 10 stem sensors and a remote and receiver this past year. I got 6 for the hotorhome 2 for the front tires which also have a run flat mod 4 for the duallies on each side and four for my Jeep toad. Iíll take the Jeepís off except when towing since it has internal tpms system already. But Iíll leave the mh on.

Ray,IN 07-19-2021 04:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dedobias (Post 5837294)
I have a 2010 Impala and one of 4 has a battery starting to go.

Those units are easy to replace though. It does confirm the "lasts the life of the tire" statement.

permitwriter 07-19-2021 10:12 AM

It seems that most of out toads have factory internal TPMS systems. Is there any way to read the output from those sensors with a receiver in the coach? Maybe I answered my own question when I did a Google search and didn't find anything.

Tireman9 07-19-2021 07:01 PM

internal / external
 
I have been running a direct comparison of the two types (TireTraker vs TST) of systems since March 2018 and have published the actual readings and data on my RV Tire blog.
Only significant difference is that the internal sensors report temperatures about 25įF hotter than external in cold weather days.


As far as I know this is the only direct comparison of two different types or brands TPMS.


Sorry I am not allowed to post a link to my blog.

RobinDella 07-19-2021 07:31 PM

Toms
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by R.Wold (Post 5826612)
I know there have been countless discussions about TPMS and I almost bought a TST system recently with external sensors, but I havenít seen this aspect of the topic discussed, other than vulnerability to theft, which Iím not worried about.

Im about to get new tires so if inside-the-tire sensors are better now is the time to find out.

Also if this is the case which brand(s) are preferred, and why?

Thanks and my apologies if I missed this aspect of this topic in earlier discussions.

Get there inside your. The one on valve stems give inaccurate temps when sun shining on it

gsdutch 07-19-2021 08:41 PM

I have the RVi sensors and called them to get the batteries replaced (must be sent back, not user serviceable) and they quoted me $170 to $200 for 12 sensors, I don't remember the exact figure. The price is reasonable per sensor but they must go back.

Sundancer268 07-20-2021 06:08 AM

The main reason I want to change my batteries on the road, no down time.

JVH 07-20-2021 02:06 PM

My concern is that on my rear dualies the outer tire stem is aimed back through one of the holes. It is a PIA to even check the pressure. I think they did it in case I need to swap the inner for the outer. I will never do this as my outer is aluminum and my inner is steel. I have considered when I change my tires I will have them put a short straight stem on it.

Sundancer268 07-20-2021 03:31 PM

As far as I know all Dual Rear Wheels, the outer Stem always points towards the inside. That is why they make the Dual Foot Tire Gauge and Air Chuck. Working on Trucks in the early 70s they all came with the stems pointing that way and my 1995 MH also has the stems in. Not sure about Pick-up dual rear wheel stems. I just attached my TST sensors on the stem of the outer tire and the stem extensions of my inner rear tires and have no issues.

RKins 07-20-2021 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JVH (Post 5839385)
My concern is that on my rear dualies the outer tire stem is aimed back through one of the holes. It is a PIA to even check the pressure. I think they did it in case I need to swap the inner for the outer. I will never do this as my outer is aluminum and my inner is steel. I have considered when I change my tires I will have them put a short straight stem on it.

I went to a local tire dealer and asked them to rotate my outer valve stems 90 degrees. Then I put my TST sensor on the valve stem and I can get to them to add air no problem.

RandDescape 07-20-2021 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sundancer268 (Post 5839482)
As far as I know all Dual Rear Wheels, the outer Stem always points towards the inside. That is why they make the Dual Foot Tire Gauge and Air Chuck. Working on Trucks in the early 70s they all came with the stems pointing that way and my 1995 MH also has the stems in. Not sure about Pick-up dual rear wheel stems. I just attached my TST sensors on the stem of the outer tire and the stem extensions of my inner rear tires and have no issues.



Neither of my Newmar MHs had the valve stem pointing toward the driveshaft. Both my Canyon Star (F53 chassis) and Ventana (Spartan chassis) have the inner wheel and outer stem facing out. Iíve only ever needed a regular chuck on them.

- Richard

R.Wold 07-20-2021 06:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sundancer268 (Post 5839482)
As far as I know all Dual Rear Wheels, the outer Stem always points towards the inside. That is why they make the Dual Foot Tire Gauge and Air Chuck. Working on Trucks in the early 70s they all came with the stems pointing that way and my 1995 MH also has the stems in. Not sure about Pick-up dual rear wheel stems. I just attached my TST sensors on the stem of the outer tire and the stem extensions of my inner rear tires and have no issues.

Quote:

Originally Posted by RandDescape (Post 5839656)
Neither of my Newmar MHs had the valve stem pointing toward the driveshaft. Both my Canyon Star (F53 chassis) and Ventana (Spartan chassis) have the inner wheel and outer stem facing out. I’ve only ever needed a regular chuck on them.

- Richard

Yeah both mine point out 180* from each other. Very convenient for externals....

So......what did I do?

Went with EEZtire more because of the dimensions of the display than anything, and external sensors. Also went with anti-theft sensors, not for the anti-theft feature but because of the size and I don’t need flow-thru. My tires don’t loose any pressure between checks.

If I get internals when I get tires I’ll put these sensors on the toad. So all is well - got it done for under $400, Ca sales tax and shipping included, and I don’t have to wait til I get new tires, which is probably a good thing since I am now in the last year of the service life (as defined by me) of these tires.

I really appreciate all the opinions, experiences, ideas, comments, etc. I was pretty well set on internals and waiting till I buy new tires, but I think this is a better decision and this thread/forum changed my mind.

So thank you one and all. And keep those ideas and preferences coming - I enjoying hearing all the different views and experiences.

Life is good......:thumb:

https://eezrvproducts.com/shop/ols/p...-yeat-warranty

R.Wold 07-20-2021 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swduns (Post 5830843)
Reminds me of Robert Frost Poem Ö. Fire and Ice

I got new tires and put in internal TST sensors
Had 6 months and numerous trips Ö so far so good
Used stem cap TST sensors on Toad. Had one rubber stem spread/fail
Taking cap off to air tires is a pain and each time is an opportunity for failure

Internal are more expensive. If batteries fail then it will cost me
But less hassle than stem cap sensors.

Either way will work. If u can afford internal I think their less hassle
But if I had unlimited funds Iíd buy a Prevost with all the bells & whistles Ö

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To know that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

I think I get it....:cool:


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