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-   -   Adjust tire pressure for cold weather?? (https://www.irv2.com/forums/f258/adjust-tire-pressure-for-cold-weather-558461.html)

Tireman9 10-23-2021 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by craigav (Post 5960052)
Just a thought to share, I usually always add about 6~7 psi more pressure than listed (on the door jamb, never exceeding the tire max psi, least not very much if any) prior to the first cold snap when performing my Fall maintenance. Otherwise when the temps drop with the first significant fall\winter cold front my newer vehicles complain about low pressure in the tires (tpms) and my older vehicle's tires need more air as well, but with no tpms to warn me.




Good plan to have a bit more ps than the minimum needed to support the load.

jadatis 10-23-2021 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chargerman (Post 5960009)
If the pressure needed to be calculated back to 70f donít you think the manufacturers would provide info to do so. Set it to the proper PSI cold. Done.

In earlyer days, people did not mind about the temperature, and did not have tmps, so then yust advice was given for the average ambiŽnt temperature.

Also people could not check the pressure while driving by tmps , so did not worry about the pressure going over fi 80 psi for an E- load tire.

So why should you worry about it now.
So the manufacturers did not go with the time.

MN_Traveler 10-23-2021 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jadatis (Post 5960459)
In earlyer days, people did not mind about the temperature, and did not have tmps, so then yust advice was given for the average ambiŽnt temperature.



Also people could not check the pressure while driving by tmps , so did not worry about the pressure going over fi 80 psi for an E- load tire.



So why should you worry about it now.

So the manufacturers did not go with the time.



Because, if you drive the tire, even for a relatively short time, while it is below its min inflation for the load, you can damage the tire. The more times you do it, the more damage can accumulate.

Kid Gloves 10-23-2021 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jadatis (Post 5960459)
In earlyer days, people did not mind about the temperature, and did not have tmps, so then yust advice was given for the average ambiŽnt temperature.

Also people could not check the pressure while driving by tmps , so did not worry about the pressure going over fi 80 psi for an E- load tire.

So why should you worry about it now.
So the manufacturers did not go with the time.

Yes, the original TPMS, Dad with a pressure gauge before a trip, when the car hadnít been driven for hours. Ambient, cold, not artificially warmed, call it what you want. Why? Because physics. Who knew?

No need to worry, then or now, about a LR-E tire going above 80psi while in operation, even if it was necessary to inflate it to 80psi cold. Why? You guessed it, physics.

The best part of all of this is that we donít need to know a thing about physics, or gas laws, or the price of salmon in Norway. Just know the weight, check the load and inflation table and inflate accordingly. The hardest thing to understand is why this is so hard to understand.

MN_Traveler 10-23-2021 09:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kid Gloves (Post 5960615)
Yes, the original TPMS, Dad with a pressure gauge before a trip, when the car hadnít been driven for hours. Ambient, cold, not artificially warmed, call it what you want. Why? Because physics. Who knew?



No need to worry, then or now, about a LR-E tire going above 80psi while in operation, even if it was necessary to inflate it to 80psi cold. Why? You guessed it, physics.



The best part of all of this is that we donít need to know a thing about physics, or gas laws, or the price of salmon in Norway. Just know the weight, check the load and inflation table and inflate accordingly. The hardest thing to understand is why this is so hard to understand.



Farmed Atlantic salmon or wild coho? [emoji4]

wvabeer 10-24-2021 04:03 AM

If you guys think you need to ad air on every colder morning then go ahead. I haven't had to ad air to my Sumitomo's in 5 years. While changing the batteries in my TPM's I evened the rears up as my ocd was bugging me. They still don't match because of temperature difference.

Kid Gloves 10-24-2021 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wvabeer (Post 5960767)
If you guys think you need to ad air on every colder morning then go ahead. I haven't had to ad air to my Sumitomo's in 5 years. While changing the batteries in my TPM's I evened the rears up as my ocd was bugging me. They still don't match because of temperature difference.

It isnít necessary to adjust tire pressures on every cold morning. Done correctly, there is no reason that side to side pressures canít be matched exactly.

What are your axle weights, what size tires are on your rig and to what pressures did you most recently set them?

R.Wold 10-24-2021 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tireman9 (Post 5956972)
jadats is Dutch so English is not his first language. He tries hard and does a better job than I would if I had to post in Dutch. Sometimes i think he tries too hard and we end up over complicated.

That explains the umlaut:D

R.Wold 10-24-2021 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chargerman (Post 5960009)
If the pressure needed to be calculated back to 70f don’t you think the manufacturers would provide info to do so. Set it to the proper PSI cold. Done.

The idea is that is not a linear equation and you need some base point from which to make the calculations. That done you can extrapolate to adjust for ambient temp and proceed. I think....or is it interpolate? No, it must be differentiate. :blink:

Personally I find myself more in 1Motorhome’s camp and don't get quite that far down in the weeds. I only recently added TPMS to my gadget collection and while I admit its value, I find it as much an annoyance/distraction as anything. For decades a morning thump with a hydrant wrench was sufficient, but I know thats sacrilege here and in all seriousness fire engines weren't operated like motorhomes, and a motor home can sustain a lot of damage from a tire failure.


Quote of the day:
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kid Gloves:
The hardest thing to understand is why this is so hard to understand.

ScottKB 10-24-2021 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fiesta48 (Post 5956829)
Way over kill posted here. Check all tires in the spring and fall. And just before each trip. 5 psi difference due to temps won't hurt any tire.
Low pressure will. Doing this for 60+ years.

I set mine to cold set point on tires before each trip and leave it. I have not done the weight math or over inflate them at cold temp as some suggest. So far so good.

jrgator 10-24-2021 03:41 PM

So, I leave Florida in a couple of weeks with the morning ambient of 75. In North Carolina two days later when the morning ambient is 40, should I raise the Florida pressure from the Michelin recommended 85 to 90 before I leave as a hedge against the low pressure in N.C.?

Max Headroom 10-24-2021 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Domo (Post 5956652)
All tire manufactures state that you should check your tire pressure in the morning before the vehicle has moved more than a mile.

They also will tell you to set the pressure to their chart pressures which they've determined by millions of miles of experience and testing for optimal performance. They also have made sure that their lawyers are happy and that those recommended pressures will keep them out of the courtrooms.

You determine your tire pressure based on weight - which is not part of this discussion (do it the way they suggest on their web sites - or follow any formula you wish to believe in).

The manufacturers understand that temperature increases; during the day, on one side of the rig due to sitting with the sun hitting that side, decreases when it snows or you go to higher/colder altitudes. They also understand that rolling the tires will increase pressures, as will air temperature increase, altitude change and "the phase of the moon." With ALL of those factors considered they made their charts and hope to keep us safe and on the road.

Yes, check your tires each morning before rolling - it's simple (TPMS can make it nearly brainless). Correct, as needed, for where/when you are.


This ^^^^ is the correct answer.
Check in the morning, before you head out, boom, your done.
No one in CONUS is going to drive between such an extreme temp shift in one day that anything more than this is needed.
As the above mentions, when was the last time you got an accurate weight on the coach, and calculated the correct COLD tire pressure?
That is a much bigger concern than daily TP fluctuations from climate.

MN_Traveler 10-24-2021 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Max Headroom (Post 5961491)
This ^^^^ is the correct answer.
Check in the morning, before you head out, boom, your done.
No one in CONUS is going to drive between such an extreme temp shift in one day that anything more than this is needed.
As the above mentions, when was the last time you got an accurate weight on the coach, and calculated the correct COLD tire pressure?
That is a much bigger concern than daily TP fluctuations from climate.



Lol. Sorry. I HAVE driven through such large ambient temp fluctuations that adjustment (in both directions) , even within the same day, was needed. Does not happen often, but it can.

Ramrod 10-24-2021 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1Motorhome (Post 5956521)
I recently noticed my cold pressure has decreased in all tires (by TPMS) by almost 7 pounds in the mornings with temps in the 40's. But within 10 driving miles they are back to normal pressure.
My question is, should I add more air at cold ambient temps to bring pressure to cold normal settings?

I always check tire pressure and adjust to proper pressure per chassis manufacturer the morning before leaving. No matter where I am. Cold or hot ambient temperature. Period.


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