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Midway1270 07-02-2022 07:19 AM

Trailer suggestion
 
Morning folks . New here, so apologize if this isnít the correct spot for asking thisÖÖ

My experience with trailers is pretty limited and was a kind time ago. For about a year I lived in one, that kept most of the wind and rain out. Canít remember make or model, but I was broke, and it was better than a cardboard box or tent .

Fast forward to today . Looking to buy thatís in much better shape. I travel for work depending on time of year. Iíll make a trip thatís about 2500 miles, park it , live in it for 3 months , then make return trip . Itíll sit for couple months unused, make about 600 mile trip, then sit in that spot for about 3-4 months, but only used couple days a week as needed. So basically itís be on the road 6-7k miles a year . I have no idea if thatís a lot, or avg amount of travel/bouncing down the road .

Iíve researched this till my eyes have bled it feels like, so figured Iíd ask some folks that are more experienced theyíre thoughts/opinions.

Iím more interested in quality/longevity than I am amenities. Based on what I think I want right now, Iíd like to get an aluminum framed trailer, not wood. Iíd also prefer fiberglass shell. Again, Iím basing this on higher quality construction , so in theory more structural integrity.

So I guess my first question Ö. Is this line of thought even valid? The salesmen that Iíve talked to have been all over the map on aluminum vs wood construction

Second question, assuming first thought is validÖ based on what I mentioned earlier, what brand/lines should I be looking at to compare?
Iíve narrowed if down to mid 20 length, bunkhouse type layout , with one slide for living area. I think thatíll suit me just fine . So if anybody had specific suggestions Iím open to that too. I have zero concerns about weight . My work truck/daily driver can handle the biggest 5th wheel made no problem, so a mid 20ft bumper pull wonít even be noticed

Anyway, I appreciate any input offered. Iím an open book , and here to learn . Again, I apologize if this isnít the correct spot for this question.

TXiceman 07-02-2022 07:52 AM

For a better built rig, look at the older units, not the current expensive junk. Look for the following:
-Nuwa HitchHiker
-Carriage Cameo
-Excel
-Teto
-DRV Mobil Suites (preThor)
are just a few.

They are not bumper pulls and mid- 20 ft length, but better built trailer.

If you have to stay small and bumper pull, look for an Artic Fox.

Ken

TandW 07-02-2022 07:54 AM

Welcome aboard!:wavey:
You'll soon be getting lots of input. You'll see!

Midway1270 07-02-2022 08:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TXiceman (Post 6232889)
For a better built rig, look at the older units, not the current expensive junk. Look for the following:
-Nuwa HitchHiker
-Carriage Cameo
-Excel
-Teto
-DRV Mobil Suites (preThor)
are just a few.

They are not bumper pulls and mid- 20 ft length, but better built trailer.

If you have to stay small and bumper pull, look for an Artic Fox.

Ken

Actually sitting in arctic fox as we speak . 10 years old I think . Guy that owns it swears itís the best . But he pulled it 30 miles home, parked it under cover, and hasnít moved since . So not much banging down the road to loosen stuff up Ö

Rzrbrn 07-02-2022 12:25 PM

Take a look at the Canadian made Big Foot 25B, a bumper pull, and made of molded fiberglass. Bought mine new in 2019. Top notch materials and workmanship. No slides. Very well insulated. On board generator.

There are plenty of well built new units in the market place, but even the best manufacturers will produce a dud now and again.

Just remember, everything made needs maintenance.

Marine359 07-02-2022 02:31 PM

A used trailer that has sit for a few years unused is likely to be in worse shape than one of the same model year that has been used by its owner. Why? Because someone who uses their trailer is more likely to have performed required maintenance (especially roof sealing) and done proper winterizing. Whatever you select, it is always advisable to pay for a NRVIA inspector to accompany you, when you’re close to a deal. That small expenditure could save you thousands in unexpected repairs. When previewing, run away from any trailer that has a musty smell, water stains, soft/bouncy floor, delaminating, rusted frame, Non or poorly functioning major appliances, like A/C, fridge, oven, furnace. Very expensive to repair any of these.

You didn’t specify whether you would be cold or hot weather camping, but in either case, choose a trailer with as much R value in the roof and walls you can find, and one that has a ducted heated underbody. For 4 seasons living, it’s a must. Otherwise, you’ll struggle to stay warm in freezing temps and stay cool in searing temperatures. You also didn’t specify your budget. If buying used 22-26 ft with these features, expect to pay $25-35k for a late model with installed solar and upgraded battery and electrical. New will be over $40k. If you’re just sitting with full hookups, you won’t need the upgrades.

Brands that fit these criteria include:
Arctic Fox
Nash
ORV
Airstream
Most molded Fiberglass Trailers
Lance

Although we love our small Winnebago, it is by no means a 4 seasons trailer.

Persistent 07-03-2022 05:42 AM

I recommend you avoid Dutchmen, Kodiak, Keystone, and Voltage. They have a high risk of a bad experience. The warranty support desk is trained to reject claims.

As you have previously discovered, any trailer is better than a cardboard box. However, some designs don't work or last for heavy long term use very well. Most smaller units are "camping" trailers.

For multiple months occupancy, you want a trailer rated for "full time". For example, warranty for floors de-laminating have been refused because the RV was not rated for full time.

For living in freezing weather, you want working plumbing. "Four Season", "All Season", or "Heated and Enclosed Underbelly" does not mean plumbing will work in freezing weather.

Look for dual pane windows, and dump valves that are inside. Belly must not only be covered, but sealed and insulated.

Some trailer designs have the fresh water tank under a seat inside the cabin. Fresh water supply is unlikely to freeze, but gray water and black water tanks are still vulnerable.

Most slide outs are poorly insulated and may not operate well when ice and snow are present.

An Air Stream dealer told me one model was rated for 17 degrees F, but was still not rated for full time living. He also said many owners do live full time in it.

I wish you good luck and happy trails ahead!:thumb:

Ivins 07-03-2022 06:14 AM

Best Trailer???
 
I don't think there's a good answer for you?

Lance trailers check most of your boxes. Good construction, four season (not really), underbelly contained, design, weight and ???. I would't have any other trailer after owning two.

MCCOHENS 07-03-2022 06:34 AM

A brand not mentioned is Evergreen, pre 2014. After that the company went bankrupt and the name was sold. Quality did not continue. We have an ascend 19, not a bunkhouse but very well built unit. The company built some excellent units, look them up on utube to see more.

Tajfish 07-03-2022 06:48 AM

I have owned two Freedom Express travel trailers. Aluminum cage with good insulation. Lived in them 4 to 6 weeks at a time. Rock hunting to fly fishing, 106 to 15 degree we have been comfortable.
Made by Coachmen. Good luck, good times.

Dave Pelletier 07-03-2022 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marine359 (Post 6233262)
A used trailer that has sit for a few years unused is likely to be in worse shape than one of the same model year that has been used by its owner. Why? Because someone who uses their trailer is more likely to have performed required maintenance (especially roof sealing) and done proper winterizing. Whatever you select, it is always advisable to pay for a NRVIA inspector to accompany you, when youíre close to a deal. That small expenditure could save you thousands in unexpected repairs. When previewing, run away from any trailer that has a musty smell, water stains, soft/bouncy floor, delaminating, rusted frame, Non or poorly functioning major appliances, like A/C, fridge, oven, furnace. Very expensive to repair any of these.

You didnít specify whether you would be cold or hot weather camping, but in either case, choose a trailer with as much R value in the roof and walls you can find, and one that has a ducted heated underbody. For 4 seasons living, itís a must. Otherwise, youíll struggle to stay warm in freezing temps and stay cool in searing temperatures. You also didnít specify your budget. If buying used 22-26 ft with these features, expect to pay $25-35k for a late model with installed solar and upgraded battery and electrical. New will be over $40k. If youíre just sitting with full hookups, you wonít need the upgrades.

Brands that fit these criteria include:
Arctic Fox
Nash
ORV
Airstream
Most molded Fiberglass Trailers
Lance

Although we love our small Winnebago, it is by no means a 4 seasons trailer.

Thanks for saving me the typing. :D:thumb:

Midway1270 07-04-2022 09:31 AM

Thank for input so far . Couple follow ups
1. Is the aluminum frame worth it from integrity standpoint? I’ve had dealers tell me yes and no so it’s confusing at best .

2. I hadn’t considered insulted holding tanks/4 season model . In the winter time it’ll be located in an area of south texas that very rarely gets to freezing. Both locations will have full hookups, so I’m not even sure if the freshwater holding tank would be used?

Dave Pelletier 07-04-2022 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Midway1270 (Post 6235053)
Thank for input so far . Couple follow ups
1. Is the aluminum frame worth it from integrity standpoint? Iíve had dealers tell me yes and no so itís confusing at best .

2. I hadnít considered insulted holding tanks/4 season model . In the winter time itíll be located in an area of south texas that very rarely gets to freezing. Both locations will have full hookups, so Iím not even sure if the freshwater holding tank would be used?

1. How the framing is done is more important than the material used; a Nash with wood framing is probably a better built trailer than many Indiana specials with aluminum. Size, spacing, type of alloy, welding (tack vs. bead), whether they put wood inside the tubes that need to hold screws (like ORV does), etc. etc. .....that said, most of the higher end units tend to be aluminum

2. in addition to a heated and enclosed tank space, most "four season" TT's have double pane windows, more insulation, etc.....which is good for both heat and cold. Also, even if the tanks don't need to be protected, the plumbing will need to be if used much below freezing. Just like the build quality issue, not all "4 season" TT's are built the same and even the best ones aren't really intended for full time, year round use.....especially in areas with significant times below freezing.

2 cents,
Dave

dbircky 07-04-2022 01:09 PM

I had a 30 foot 2001 keystone bumper hitch trailer for 19 years. Towed it over 100,000 miles. No leaks, nothing broke. It had one slide and slept 10. Must have been the true unicorn. Or was it when it was built? I read on here of people buying new very expensive motor homes and have 70+ problems with them in the first month.


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